ronaldweinland.info Tutorials PRACTICING MY FIRST REAL KISS EBOOK

PRACTICING MY FIRST REAL KISS EBOOK

Thursday, October 10, 2019 admin Comments(0)

Author: Ciara Jaime Garcia (Seeyara) Genre: Tagalog Romance Published: by Wattpad Language: Filipino, Pilipino Read on Wattpad Book Summary What. May 8, Read EPILOGUE. 11 Years After. from the story Remembering My First Real Kiss - PUBLISHED Under Pop Fiction by seeyara . Download practicing my first real ronaldweinland.info, Size: KB, File name: practicing my first real ronaldweinland.info, Uploaded: TZ.


Author:LORA TESTEN
Language:English, Spanish, Dutch
Country:Nepal
Genre:Lifestyle
Pages:366
Published (Last):30.06.2015
ISBN:647-8-40300-155-9
ePub File Size:15.53 MB
PDF File Size:18.10 MB
Distribution:Free* [*Register to download]
Downloads:46271
Uploaded by: FLORENTINO

Practicing My First Real Kiss book. Read 16 reviews from the world's largest community for readers. What started as a DEAL, unexpectedly turned into LOVE. A verification email is sent. Your email is invalid. Click here to update it Practicing My First Real Kiss (My First Real Kiss Series #1) Links For. Mars Ochoco is your typical, hormonal high school student, socially awkward, insecure at times, and madrama to death. She Isn't a popular girl either. The only .

I'll be really very grateful. Example 1. Getting back to the true you. Maryse's Book Blog — Following my heart, one book at a time… ; Following my heart, one book at a time… I had read I had some difficulty remembering anything about a lot of them. Income distribution. Labor economics.

And at once he turned and galloped Eastward down the valley. The King strode on at a great pace, sometimes muttering to himself and sometimes clenching his fists. Jewel walked beside him, saying nothing; so there was no sound between them but the faint jingle of a rich gold chain that hung round the Unicorn's neck and the noise of two feet and four hoofs. They soon reached the River and turned up it where there was a grassy road: they had the water on their left and the forest on their right.

Soon after that they came to the place where the ground grew rougher and thick wood came down to the water's edge. The road, what there was of it, now ran on the southern bank and they had to ford the River to reach it. It was up to Tirian's armpits, but Jewel who had four legs and was therefore steadier kept on his right to break the force of the current, and Tirian put his strong arm round the Unicorn's strong neck and they both got safely over.

The King was still so angry that he hardly noticed the cold of the water. But of course he dried his sword very carefully on the shoulder of his cloak, which was the only dry part of him, as soon as they came to shore.

They were now going westward with the River on their right and Lantern Waste straight ahead of them. They had not gone more than a mile when they both stopped and both spoke at the same moment. The King said "What have we here" and Jewel said "Look! And so it was.

Half a dozen splendid tree trunks, all newly cut and newly lopped of their branches, had been lashed together to make a raft, and were gliding swiftly down the River. On the front of the raft there was a water rat with a pole to steer it. Water Rat! What are you about? Who gave order for these trees to be felled?

Aslan himself. The King and the Unicorn stared at one another and both looked more frightened than they had ever been in any battle. Could it be true? Could he be felling the holy trees and murdering the Dryads? He did not see at the moment how foolish it was for two of them to go alone; nor did the King. They were too angry to think clearly.

But much evil came of their rashness in the end. Suddenly the King leaned hard on his friend's neck and bowed his head. Horrible thoughts arise in my heart. If we had died before to-day we should have been happy.

remembering my first real kiss.txt

The worst thing in the world has come upon us. Before long they could hear the hack-hack-hack of axes falling on timber, though they could see nothing yet because there was a rise of the ground in front of them. When they had reached the top of it they could see right into Lantern Waste itself. And the King's face turned white when he saw it.

Right through the middle of that ancient forest—that forest where the trees of gold and of silver had once grown and where a child from our world had once planted the Tree of Protection—a broad lane had already been opened. It was a hideous lane like a raw gash in the land, full of muddy ruts where felled trees had been dragged down to the river. There was a great crowd of people at work, and a cracking of whips, and horses tugging and straining as they dragged at the logs. The first thing that struck the King and the Unicorn was that about half the people in the crowd were not Talking Beasts but Men.

The next thing was that these men were not the fair-haired men of Narnia: they were dark, bearded men from Calormen, that great and cruel country that lies beyond Archenland across the desert to the south. There was no reason, of course, why one should not meet a Calormene or two in Narnia—a merchant or an ambassador—for there was peace between Narnia and Calormen in those days.

But Tirian could not understand why there are so many of them: nor why they were cutting down a Narnian forest. He grasped his sword tighter and rolled his cloak round his left arm. They came quickly down among the men. Two Calormenes were driving a horse which was harnessed to a log. Just as the King reached them, the log got stuck in a bad muddy place.

Pull, you lazy pig! The horse was already straining himself as hard as he could; his eyes were red and he was covered with foam. It was then that the really dreadful thing happened. Up till now Tirian had taken it for granted that the horses which the Calormenes were driving were their own horses; dumb, witless animals like the horses of our own world. And though he hated to see even a dumb horse overdriven, he was of course thinking more about the murder of the Trees.

It had never crossed his mind that anyone would dare to harness one of the free Talking Horses of Narnia, much less to use a whip on it. But as that savage blow fell the horse reared up and said, half screaming: "Fool and tyrant!

Do you not see I am doing all I can? The King's sword went up, the Unicorn's horn went down. They rushed forward together. Next moment both the Calormenes lay dead, the one beheaded by Tirian's sword and the other gored through the heart by Jewel's horn.

Is Narnia conquered? Has there been a battle? It is all by his orders. He has commanded——" "'Ware danger, King," said Jewel. Tirian looked up and saw that Calormenes mixed with a few Talking Beasts were beginning to run towards them from every direction.

The two dead men had died without a cry and so it had taken a moment before the rest of the crowd knew what had happened. But now they did. Most of them had naked scimitars in their hands. On my back," said Jewel. The King flung himself astride of his old friend who turned and galloped away. He changed direction twice or thrice as soon as they were out of sight of their enemies, crossed a stream, and shouted without slackening his pace, "Whither away, Sire? To Cair Paravel?

We are two murderers, Jewel. I am dishonoured forever. He too was ashamed. The Rat said the same. They all say Aslan is here. But if it were true? We, who are murderers. Jewel, I will go back. I will give up my sword and put myself in the hands of these Calormenes and ask that they bring me before Aslan.

Let him do justice to me. Would it not be better to be dead than to have this horrible fear that Aslan has come and is not like the Aslan we have believed in and longed for? It is as if the sun rose one day and were a black sun. You are in the right, Sire. This is the end of all things. Let us go and give ourselves up. As soon as they came to the place where the work was going on the Calormenes raised a cry and came towards them with their weapons in hand.

But the King held out his sword with the hilt towards them and said: "I who was King of Narnia and am now a dishonoured knight give myself up to the justice of Aslan. Bring me before him. Then the dark men came round them in a thick crowd, smelling of garlic and onions, their white eyes flashing dreadfully in their brown faces. They put a rope halter round Jewel's neck. They took the King's sword away and tied his hands behind his back. One of the Calormenes, who had a helmet instead of a turban and seemed to be in command, snatched the gold circlet off Tirian's head and hastily put it away somewhere among his clothes.

They led the two prisoners uphill to a place where there was a big clearing. And this was what the prisoners saw. At the centre of the clearing, which was also the highest point of the hill, there was a little hut like a stable, with a thatched roof.

Its door was shut. On the grass in front of the door there sat an Ape. Tirian and Jewel, who had been expecting to see Aslan and had heard nothing about an Ape yet, were very bewildered when they saw it. The Ape was of course Shift himself, but he looked ten times uglier than when he lived by Caldron Pool, for he was now dressed up.

He was wearing a scarlet jacket which did not fit him very well, having been made for a dwarf. He had jewelled slippers on his hind paws which would not stay on properly because, as you know, the hind paws of an Ape are really like hands. He wore what seemed to be a paper crown on his head. There was a great pile of nuts beside him and he kept cracking nuts with his jaws and spitting out the shells. And he also kept on pulling up the scarlet jacket to scratch himself. A great number of Talking Beasts stood facing him, and nearly every face in that crowd looked miserably worried and bewildered.

When they saw who the prisoners were, they all groaned and whimpered. By our skill and courage and by the permission of the great god Tash we have taken alive these two desperate murderers.

So they took the King's sword and handed it, with the sword-belt and all, to the monkey. And he hung it round his own neck: and it made him look sillier than ever.

They can wait. Now listen to me, everyone. The first thing I want to say is about nuts. Where's that Head Squirrel got to? I want—I mean, Aslan wants—some more nuts. These you've brought aren't anything near enough. You must bring some more, do you hear? Twice as many. And they got to be here by sunset tomorrow, and there mustn't be any bad ones or any small ones among them. In we might be allowed to see him——" "Well you won't," said the Ape. Then you can all have a look at him.

But he will not have you all crowding round him and pestering him with questions. Anything you want to say to him will be passed on through me: if I think it's worth bothering him about. In the meantime all you squirrels had better go and see about the nuts. And make sure they are here by tomorrow evening or, my word! This new order was terrible news for them. The nuts they had carefully hoarded for the winter had nearly all been eaten by now; and of the few that were left they had already given the Ape far more than they could spare.

Then a deep voice—it belonged to a great tusked and shaggy Boar—spoke from another part of the crowd. Aslan says he's been far too soft with you before, do you see? Well, he isn't going to be soft any more.

He's going to lick you into shape this time. He'll teach you to think he's a tame lion! Well, I'm not. I'm a Man. If I look like an Ape, that's because I'm so very old: hundreds and hundreds of years old. And it's because I'm so old that I'm so wise. And it's because I'm so wise that I'm the only one Aslan is ever going to speak to.

He can't be bothered talking to a lot of stupid animals. He'll tell me what you've got to do, and I'll tell the rest of you. And take my advice, and see you do it in double quick time, for He doesn't mean to stand any nonsense.

Well, you can get that idea out of your heads at once. And not only the Horses either. Everybody who can work is going to be made to work in the future. Aslan has it all settled with the King of Calormen—The Tisroc, as our dark-faced friends, the Calormenes, call him.

All you horses and bulls and donkeys are to be sent down into Calormen to work for your living—pulling and carrying the way horses and such do in other countries.

And all you digging animals like moles and rabbits and Dwarfs are going down to work in the Tisroc's mines. And——" "No, no, no," howled the Beasts. Aslan would never sell us into slavery to the King of Calormen. Hold your noise!

You won't be slaves. You'll be paid—very good wages too. That is to say, your pay will be paid in to Aslan's treasury and he will use it all for everybody's good. The Calormene bowed and replied, in the pompous Calormene way: "Most sapient Mouthpiece of Aslan, the Tisroc may he live forever is wholly of one mind with your lordship in this judicious plan.

You see! And all for your own good. We'll be able, with the money you earn, to make Narnia a country worth living in. There'll be oranges and bananas pouring in—and roads and big cities and schools and offices and whips and muzzles and saddles and cages and kennels and prisons—Oh, everything.

Social Media

And we want to hear Aslan speak himself. I'm a Man: you're only a fat, stupid old Bear. What do you know about freedom? You think freedom means doing what you like. Well, you're wrong. That isn't true freedom.

True freedom means doing what I tell you. What have we to do with the Calormenes? We belong to Aslan. They belong to Tash. They have a god called Tash. They say he has four arms and the head of a vulture. They kill Men on his altar. I don't believe there's any such person as Tash. But if there was, how could Aslan be friends with him? They knew it was the best question anyone had asked yet.

list of soft ronaldweinland.info (K views)

The Ape jumped up and spat at the Lamb. Go home to your mother and drink milk. What do you understand of such things? But you others, listen. Tash is only another name for Aslan. All that old idea of us being right and the Calormenes wrong is silly. We know better now.

The Calormenes use different words but we all mean the same thing. Tash and Aslan are only two different names for you know Who. That's why there can never be any quarrel between them. Get that into your heads, you stupid brutes. Tash is Aslan: Aslan is Tash. Think of that and then think of all the faces of those Talking Beasts—all those honest, humble, bewildered birds, bears, badgers, rabbits, moles, and mice—all far sadder than that.

Every tail was down, every whisker drooped. It would have broken your heart with very pity to see their faces. There was only one who did not look at all unhappy.

It was a ginger cat—a great big Tom in the prime of life—who sat bolt upright with his tail curled round his toes, in the very front row of all the Beasts.

Ebook real my practicing first kiss

He had been staring hard at the Ape and the Calormene captain all the time and had never once blinked his eyes. Does your friend from Calormen say the same? Aslan means neither less nor more than Tash. I only wanted to be quite clear. I think I am beginning to understand. But now, as Tirian looked round on the miserable faces of the Narnians, and saw how they would all believe that Aslan and Tash were one and the same, he could bear it no longer.

You lie damnably. You lie like a Calormene. You lie like an Ape. If he had been allowed to speak, the rule of the Ape might have ended that day; the Beasts might have seen the truth and thrown the Ape down. But before he could say another word two Calormenes struck him in the mouth with all their force, and a third, from behind, kicked his feet from under him.

And as he fell, the Ape squealed in rage and terror: "Take him away. Take him away. Take him where he cannot hear us, nor we hear him. There tie him to a tree. I will—I mean, Aslan will—do justice to him later. Then they bound ropes round his ankles and his knees and his waist and his chest and left him there. What worried him worst at the moment—for it is often little things that are hardest to stand—was that his lip was bleeding where they had hit him and he couldn't wipe the little trickle of blood away although it tickled him.

From where he was he could still see the little stable on the top of the hill and the Ape sitting in front of it. He could just hear the Ape's voice still going on and, every now and then, some answer from the crowd but he could not make out the words.

Presently the crowd of Beasts broke up and began going away in different directions. Some passed close to Tirian. They looked at him as if they were both frightened and sorry to see him tied up but none of them spoke. Soon they had all gone and there was silence in the wood. Then hours and hours went past and Tirian became first very thirsty and then very hungry; and as the afternoon dragged on and turned into evening, he became cold too.

His back was very sore. The sun went down and it began to be twilight. When it was almost dark Tirian heard a light pitter-patter of feet and saw some small creatures coming towards him.

The three on the left were Mice, and there was a Rabbit in the middle: on the right were two Moles. Both of these were carrying little bags on their backs which gave them a curious look in the dark so that at first he wondered what kind of beasts they were. Then, in a moment, they were all standing up on their hind legs, laying their cool paws on his knees and giving his knees snuffly animal kisses.

They could reach his knees because Narnian Talking Beasts of that sort are bigger than the dumb beasts of the same kinds in England. We daren't untie you because Aslan might be angry with us. But we've brought you your supper. Then the second Mouse climbed up and hung on just below the first Mouse. The other beasts stood on the ground and began handing things up. It was only the size of an eggcup so that he had hardly tasted the wine in it before it was empty.

But then the Mouse passed it down and the others re-filled it and it was passed up again and Tirian emptied it a second time. In this way they went on till he had quite a good drink, which was all the better for coming in little doses, for that is more thirst-quenching than one long draught. There is blood on it. We don't want any other King. We're your people. If it were only the Ape and the Calormenes who were against you, we would have fought till we were cut into pieces before we'd have let them tie you up.

We would, we would indeed. But we can't go against Aslan. We all saw him. But there's no doubt about it. Everyone says it is Aslan's orders, and we've seen him. We didn't think Aslan would be like that. Why, we—we wanted him to come back to Narnia. He must be punishing us for something.

But I do think we might be told what it was! It would never do for us to be caught here. The stars came out and time went slowly on—imagine how slowly—while the last King of Narnia stood stiff and sore and upright against the tree in his bonds.

But at last something happened. Far away there appeared a red light. Then it disappeared for a moment and came back again, bigger and stronger. Then he could see dark shapes going to and fro on this side of the light and carrying bundles and throwing them down.

He knew now what he was looking at. It was a bonfire, newly lit, and people were throwing bundles of brushwood onto it. Presently it blazed up and Tirian could see that it was on the very top of the hill. He could see quite clearly the stable behind it, all lit up in the red glow, and a great crowd of Beasts and Men between the fire and himself.

A small figure, hunched up beside the fire, must be the Ape. It was saying something to the crowd, but he could not hear what. Then it went and bowed three times to the ground in front of the door of the stable. Then it got up and opened the door. And something on four legs—something that walked rather stiffly—came out of the stable and stood facing the crowd. A great wailing or howling went up, so loud that Tirian could hear some of the words. Comfort us.

Be angry with us no more. He had never seen the Great Lion. He had never seen even a common lion. He couldn't be sure that what he saw was not the real Aslan. He had not expected Aslan to look like that stiff thing which stood and said nothing. But how could one be sure? For a moment horrible thoughts went through his mind: then he remembered the nonsense about Tash and Aslan being the same and knew that the whole thing must be a cheat.

The Ape put his head close up to the yellow thing's head as if he were listening to something it was whispering to him. Then he turned and spoke to the crowd, and the crowd wailed again. Then the yellow thing turned clumsily round and walked—you might almost say, waddled—back into the stable and the Ape shut the door behind it. She was about to ask another question, but he cut her short by wrapping his arms around her and pressing his lips to hers.

Nor should he have buried his fingers in her hair and cupped the back of her head to guide her lips to his. Nor should he have deepened the kiss when she responded, her soft, pliant lips yielding to his possessive conquest. His primitive instincts had taken over. Only his low brain seemed to be working and had taken control. Her soft, ample breasts molded to his firm chest. Healthy breasts. Lord, they were healthy.

Mate with this girl. It was as though she had been built to fit him. And his low brain knew it. Fertile female. Want this female. Need to spill seed into this exquisite, beautiful— He abruptly pulled his mouth off hers.

He eased his hold on her. Your first kiss. And oh, I almost forgot, I was really dumbfounded on the part wherein their teacher is giving a love advice to the female main character. What the? Any complains about the characters? Mars female main character character is really crazy. And I somewhat like that, ehehehe.

The only complain that I have on her was on how she pitied herself just to make Mark change his decision on breaking up with her oh yeah, so sorry for the major bummer, hehe.

Real ebook kiss my practicing first

And about Mark?