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SYSTEM. ANALYSIS AND. DESIGN. Fifth Edition Systems analysis and design /Alan Dennis, Barbara Haley Wixom, Roberta M. Roth.–5th ed. business analysis benchmark - full ronaldweinland.info; accessed February,. System Analysis & Design. A n O bject -O riented A pproach with UML. Fifth Edition. Alan Dennis. Indiana University. Barbara Haley Wixom. Massachusetts. Systems analysis and design /Alan Dennis, Barbara Haley Wixom, Roberta M. Roth.–5th ed. p. cm. Includes index. ISBN (acid-free paper) 1 .

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Today, the number of universities offering power engineering programs has decreased. Some universities, such as Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute, no longer have separate power system engineering departments.

According to the IEEE, the number of power system engineering graduates has dropped from approximately 2, per year in the s to today. Turning this situation around will require a longterm effort by many groups working together, including utilities, consultants, manufacturers, universities, and groups such as the IEEE Power Engineering Society PES.

Part of the challenge is that utilities are competing for engineering students against other industries, such as telecommunications or computer software development, that are perceived as being more glamorous or more hip than the power industry and have no problem attracting large numbers of new engineers. For the most part, the power industry has not done a great job of selling itself. Too often, headlines focus on negatives such as rate increases, power outages, and community relations issues related to a proposed new generation plant or transmission line.

To a large extent, the industry also has become a victim of its own success by delivering electricity so reliably that the public generally takes it for granted, which makes the good news more difficult to tell. PES can play an important role in this. On a related note, as the industry continues to develop new, innovative technologies, they should be documented and showcased to help generate excitement about the industry among college-age engineers and help attract them to power system engineering.

The utilities, consultants, and manufacturers must strengthen their relationships with strong technical institutions to continue increasing support for electrical engineering departments to offer power systems classes at the undergraduate level. In some cases, this may even require underwriting a class. Experience at National Grid has shown that when support for a class is guaranteed, the number of students who sign up typically is greater than expected. The industry needs to further support these Copyright Cengage Learning.

CASE STUDY efforts by offering presentations to students on the complexity of the power system, real problems that need to be solved, and the impact that a reliable, cost-efficient power system has on society.

Sponsoring more student internships and research projects will introduce additional students and faculty to the unique challenges of the industry. In the future, the industry will have to hire more nonpower engineers and train them in the specifics of power system engineering or rely on hiring from overseas.

Finally, the industry needs to cultivate relationships with universities to assist in developing professors who are knowledgeable about the industry. This can take the form of research work, consulting, and teaching custom programs for the industry. National Grid has developed relationships with several northeastern U.

The courses can be offered online, at the university, or on site at the utility. This problem will only get worse if industry leaders do not work together to resolve it. It is an ever-changing system both in physical terms and how it is operated and regulated.

These changes must be recognized and actions developed accordingly.

Systems Analysis Design 5th Edition By Dennis, Wixom and roth PDF Book Download

Since the industry is made up of many organizations that share the system, it can be difficult to agree on action plans. There are a few points on which all can agree. The first is that the transmission assets continue to get older and investment is not keeping up with needs when looking over a future horizon.

The issue will only get worse as more lines and substations exceed the year age mark. Technology development and application undoubtedly will increase as engineers look for new and creative ways to combat the congestion issues and increased 9 electrical demand—and new overhead transmission lines will be only one of the solutions considered.

The second is that it will be important for further refinement in the restructuring of the industry to occur. The changes made since the late s have delivered benefits to customers in the Northeast in the form of lower energy costs and access to greater competitive electric markets.

Regulators and policymakers should recognize that independently owned, operated, managed, and widely planned networks are important to solving future problems most efficiently. Having a reliable, regional, uncongested transmission system will enable a healthy competitive marketplace. Over the last year, there has been significant discussion of the issue, but it will take a considerable effort by many to guide the future workforce into a position of appreciating the electricity industry and desiring to enter it and to ensure that the training and education systems are in place to develop the new engineers who will be required to upgrade and maintain the electric power system.

The industry has many challenges, but it also has great resources and a good reputation. Through the efforts of many and by working together through organizations such as PES, the industry can move forward to the benefit of the public and the United States as a whole.

Transmission; Mary Ellen Paravalos, director, regulatory policy, U. Transmission; Joseph Rossignoli, principal analyst, regulatory policy, U. Delivering the promise of industry restructuring to Copyright Cengage Learning. Energy, Aug. He received a B. Edison began work on the electric light and formulated the concept of a centrally located power station with distributed lighting serving a surrounding area. He perfected his light by October , and the opening of his historic Pearl Street Station in New York City on September 4, , marked the beginning of the electric utility industry see Figure 1.

At Pearl Street, dc generators, then called dynamos, were driven by steam engines to supply an initial load of 30 kW for V incandescent lighting to 59 customers in a one-square-mile area. From this beginning in through , the electric utility industry grew at a remarkable pace—a growth based on continuous reductions in the price of electricity due primarily to technological acomplishment and creative engineering. The development of three-wire V dc systems allowed load to increase somewhat, but as transmission distances and loads continued to increase, voltage problems were encountered.

Stanley installed an ac distribution system in Great Barrington, Massachusetts, to supply lamps. With the transformer, the ability to transmit power at high voltage with corresponding lower current and lower line-voltage drops made ac more attractive than dc. Rustebakke et al. New York: Wiley, Photos courtesy of Westinghouse Historical Collection The growth of ac systems was further encouraged in when Nikola Tesla presented a paper at a meeting of the American Institute of Electrical Engineers describing two-phase induction and synchronous motors, which made evident the advantages of polyphase versus single-phase systems.

The three-phase induction motor conceived by Tesla went on to become the workhorse of the industry.

CHEAT SHEET

Since then, most electric energy has been generated in steam-powered and in waterpowered called hydro turbine plants. Gas turbines are used in some cases to meet peak loads. Also, the addition of wind turbines into the bulk power system is expected to grow considerably in the near future. Of these, coal is the most widely used fuel in the United States due to its abundance in the country. Although many of these coal-fueled power plants were converted to oil during the early s, that trend has been reversed back to coal since the —74 oil embargo, which caused an oil shortage and created a national desire to reduce dependency on foreign oil.

In , nuclear units with MW steam-turbine capacity, fueled by uranium, were installed, and today nuclear units with MW steamturbine capacity are in service. However, the growth of nuclear capacity in the United States has been halted by rising construction costs, licensing delays, and public opinion. Although there are no emissions associated with nuclear power generation, there are safety issues and environmental issues, such as the disposal of used nuclear fuel and the impact of heated cooling-tower water on aquatic habitats.

Future technologies for nuclear power are concentrated on safety and environmental issues [2, 3]. On the other hand, nuclear fusion energy just may.

The fuel consumed in a nuclear fusion reaction is deuterium, of which a virtually inexhaustible supply is present in seawater. The early ac systems operated at various frequencies including 25, 50, 60, and Hz. In , it was proposed that 60 Hz be the standard frequency in the United States. In , Hz systems were introduced with the Copyright Cengage Learning. New York: Wiley, ; U. Bahrman and B. In , Southern California Edison also converted from 50 to 60 Hz. Today, the two standard frequencies for generation, transmission, and distribution of electric power in the world are 60 Hz in the United States, Canada, Japan, Brazil and 50 Hz in Europe, the former Soviet republics, South America except Brazil, and India.

The advantage of Hz systems is that generators, motors, and transformers in these systems are generally smaller than Hz equipment with the same ratings. The advantage of Hz systems is that transmission lines and transformers have smaller reactances at 50 Hz than at 60 Hz. As shown in Figure 1. This corresponds to a doubling of electric energy consumption every 10 years over the year period.

In other words, every 10 years the industry installed a new electric system equal in energy-producing capacity to the total of what it had built since the industry began. The annual growth rate slowed after the oil embargo of — Kilowatt-hour consumption in the United States increased by 3. Along with increases in load growth, there have been continuing increases in the size of generating units Table 1.

The principal incentive to build larger units has been economy of scale—that is, a reduction in installed cost per kilowatt of capacity for larger units.

For example, in the average heat rate for steam generation in the U. TABLE 1. Voltage kV 2. Federal policymakers continue to encourage transmission owners across the nation to join RTOs. Broad regional markets require policies that facilitate and encourage active grid planning, management, and the construction of transmission upgrades both for reliability and economic needs. A strong transmission infrastructure or network platform would allow greater fuel diversity, more stable and competitive energy prices, and the relaxation and perhaps ultimate removal of administrative mechanisms to mitigate market power.

This would also allow for common asset management approaches to the transmission system. The creation of independent transmission companies ITCs , i. ITCs recognize transmission as an enabler of competitive electricity markets. In its policy statement released in June , FERC reiterated its commitment to ITC formation to support improving the performance and efficiency of the grid.

An ideal industry structure would permit ITCs to own, operate, and manage transmission assets over a wide area. This would allow ITCs to access economies of scale in asset investment, planning, and operations to increase throughout and enhance reliability in the most cost-effective manner. This structure would also avoid ownership fragmentation within a single market, which is a key obstacle to the introduction of performance-based rates that benefit customers by aligning the interests of transmission companies and customers in reducing congestion.

CASE STUDY the transmission sector under a single regulated for-profit entity is key to establishing an industry structure that recognizes the transmission system as a market enabler and provider of infrastructure to support effective competitive markets.

Market administration would be contracted out to another potentially nonprofit entity while generators, other suppliers, demand response providers, and load serving entities LSEs would all compete and innovate in fully functioning markets, delivering stillincreased efficiency and more choices for customers.

However, the industry also operates within an environment governed by substantial regulatory controls. Therefore, policymakers also will have a significant role in helping to remove the obstacles to the delivery of the full benefits of industry restructuring to customers.

In order to ensure adequate transmission investment and the expansion of the system as appropriate, the following policy issues must be addressed:.

Design systems analysis 5th edition pdf and

Regional planning: Because the transmission system is an integrated network, planning for system needs should occur on a regional basis. Regional planning recognizes that transmission investment and the benefits transmission can deliver to customers are regional in nature rather than bounded by state or service area lines. Meaningful regional planning processes also take into account the fact that transmission provides both reliability and economic benefits.

Comprehensive planning processes provide for mechanisms to pursue regulated transmission solutions for reliability and economic needs in the event that the market fails to respond or is identified as unlikely to respond to these needs in a timely manner.

In areas where regional system planning processes have been implemented, such as New England and PJM, progress is being made towards identifying and building transmission projects that will address 7 regional needs and do so in a way that is cost effective for customers. Cost recovery and allocation: Comprehensive regional planning processes that identify needed transmission projects must be accompanied by cost recovery and allocation mechanisms that recognize the broad benefits of transmission and its role in supporting and enabling regional electricity markets.

Mechanisms that allocate the costs of transmission investment broadly view transmission as the regional market enabler it is and should be, provide greater certainty and reduce delays in cost recovery, and, thus, remove obstacles to provide further incentives for the owners and operators of transmission to make such investment.

Certainty of rate recovery and state cooperation: It is critical that transmission owners are assured certain and adequate rate recovery under a regional planning process. Independent administration of the planning processes will assure that transmission enhancements required for reliability and market efficiency do not unduly burden retail customers with additional costs.

FERC and the states must work together to provide for certainty in rate recovery from ultimate customers through federal and state jurisdictional rates. Incentives to encourage transmission investment, independence, and consolidation: At a time when a significant increase in transmission investment is needed to ensure reliability, produce an adequate platform for competitive power markets and regional electricity commerce, and to promote fuel diversity and renewable sources of supply, incentives not only for investment but also for independence and consolidation of transmission are needed and warranted.

Incentives should be designed to promote transmission organizations that acknowledge the benefits to customers of varying degrees of transmission independence and reward that independence accordingly. The future transmission system must be able to meet the needs of customers reliably and support competitive markets that provide them with electricity efficiently. Failure to invest in the transmission system now will mean an increased likelihood of reduced reliability and higher costs to customers in the future.

As previously noted, this will lead to a required significant increase in capital spending. But another critical resource is beginning to become a concern to many in the industry, specifically the continued availability of qualified power system engineers.

This puts the average age near 50, with many utilities still hiring just a few college graduates each year. Looking a few years ahead, at the same time when a significant number of power engineers will be considering retirement, the need for them will be significantly increasing.

The supply of power engineers will have to be great enough to replace the large numbers of those retiring in addition to the number required to respond to the anticipated increase in transmission capital spending. Today, the number of universities offering power engineering programs has decreased. Some universities, such as Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute, no longer have separate power system engineering departments.

According to the IEEE, the number of power system engineering graduates has dropped from approximately 2, per year in the s to today. Turning this situation around will require a longterm effort by many groups working together, including utilities, consultants, manufacturers, universities, and groups such as the IEEE Power Engineering Society PES. Part of the challenge is that utilities are competing for engineering students against other industries, such as telecommunications or computer software development, that are perceived as being more glamorous or more hip than the power industry and have no problem attracting large numbers of new engineers.

For the most part, the power industry has not done a great job of selling itself. Too often, headlines focus on negatives such as rate increases, power outages, and community relations issues related to a proposed new generation plant or transmission line.

To a large extent, the industry also has become a victim of its own success by delivering electricity so reliably that the public generally takes it for granted, which makes the good news more difficult to tell.

PES can play an important role in this. On a related note, as the industry continues to develop new, innovative technologies, they should be documented and showcased to help generate excitement about the industry among college-age engineers and help attract them to power system engineering.

The utilities, consultants, and manufacturers must strengthen their relationships with strong technical institutions to continue increasing support for electrical engineering departments to offer power systems classes at the undergraduate level. In some cases, this may even require underwriting a class. Experience at National Grid has shown that when support for a class is guaranteed, the number of students who sign up typically is greater than expected.

The industry needs to further support these Copyright Cengage Learning. CASE STUDY efforts by offering presentations to students on the complexity of the power system, real problems that need to be solved, and the impact that a reliable, cost-efficient power system has on society.

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Sponsoring more student internships and research projects will introduce additional students and faculty to the unique challenges of the industry. In the future, the industry will have to hire more nonpower engineers and train them in the specifics of power system engineering or rely on hiring from overseas.

Finally, the industry needs to cultivate relationships with universities to assist in developing professors who are knowledgeable about the industry. This can take the form of research work, consulting, and teaching custom programs for the industry. National Grid has developed relationships with several northeastern U.

The courses can be offered online, at the university, or on site at the utility. This problem will only get worse if industry leaders do not work together to resolve it. It is an ever-changing system both in physical terms and how it is operated and regulated. These changes must be recognized and actions developed accordingly. Since the industry is made up of many organizations that share the system, it can be difficult to agree on action plans.

There are a few points on which all can agree. The first is that the transmission assets continue to get older and investment is not keeping up with needs when looking over a future horizon.

Solutions manual for systems analysis and design 6th edition by dennis

The issue will only get worse as more lines and substations exceed the year age mark. Technology development and application undoubtedly will increase as engineers look for new and creative ways to combat the congestion issues and increased 9 electrical demand—and new overhead transmission lines will be only one of the solutions considered. The second is that it will be important for further refinement in the restructuring of the industry to occur. The changes made since the late s have delivered benefits to customers in the Northeast in the form of lower energy costs and access to greater competitive electric markets.

Regulators and policymakers should recognize that independently owned, operated, managed, and widely planned networks are important to solving future problems most efficiently. Having a reliable, regional, uncongested transmission system will enable a healthy competitive marketplace. Over the last year, there has been significant discussion of the issue, but it will take a considerable effort by many to guide the future workforce into a position of appreciating the electricity industry and desiring to enter it and to ensure that the training and education systems are in place to develop the new engineers who will be required to upgrade and maintain the electric power system.

The industry has many challenges, but it also has great resources and a good reputation. Through the efforts of many and by working together through organizations such as PES, the industry can move forward to the benefit of the public and the United States as a whole.

Transmission; Mary Ellen Paravalos, director, regulatory policy, U. Transmission; Joseph Rossignoli, principal analyst, regulatory policy, U.

Design and systems 5th pdf analysis edition

Delivering the promise of industry restructuring to Copyright Cengage Learning. Energy, Aug. He received a B. Edison began work on the electric light and formulated the concept of a centrally located power station with distributed lighting serving a surrounding area.

He perfected his light by October , and the opening of his historic Pearl Street Station in New York City on September 4, , marked the beginning of the electric utility industry see Figure 1. At Pearl Street, dc generators, then called dynamos, were driven by steam engines to supply an initial load of 30 kW for V incandescent lighting to 59 customers in a one-square-mile area.

From this beginning in through , the electric utility industry grew at a remarkable pace—a growth based on continuous reductions in the price of electricity due primarily to technological acomplishment and creative engineering. The development of three-wire V dc systems allowed load to increase somewhat, but as transmission distances and loads continued to increase, voltage problems were encountered. Stanley installed an ac distribution system in Great Barrington, Massachusetts, to supply lamps.

With the transformer, the ability to transmit power at high voltage with corresponding lower current and lower line-voltage drops made ac more attractive than dc. Textbook Solutions.

Systems Analysis and Design 5th Edition Edit edition. Looking for the textbook? We have solutions for your book! Step-by-step solution:. JavaScript Not Detected. Consider the admission process of a kid into a school. Comment 0. View a full sample. Rent download.