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ESSENTIALS OF CONTEMPORARY MANAGEMENT EBOOK

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In this seventh edition of Essentials of Contemporary Management, the focus continues to be on providing the most up-to-date account of the changes taking. Essentials of Contemporary Management, 7th Edition by Gareth Jones and Jennifer Integrated course eBook; Supporting how-to videos, interactives and extra. ISE eBook Online Access for Essentials of Contemporary Management. 8th edition. ISE eBook Online Access for Essentials of Contemporary.


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Editorial Reviews. About the Author. Jennifer George received a B.A. in psychology and Essentials of Contemporary Management 7th Edition, Kindle Edition. Editorial Reviews. About the Author. Jennifer George is also a Professor of Management in the Lowry Mays College and Graduate School of Business at Texas. Online PDF Essentials of Contemporary Management, Read PDF Essentials of the book Essentials of Contemporary Management, Gareth R Jones ebook.

About this title Essentials of Contemporary Management, Eighth Edition, provides the most current account of changes taking place in the world of management and management practices while making the text relevant and interesting to students. Management students often need help relating theories and concepts, such as diversity, sustainability, and globalization, to themselves and the business world. Our powerful Association to Advance Collegiate Schools of Business—accredited text and technology helps instructors hold students accountable for baseline knowledge so instructors can more readily bring concepts to life. Building Management Skills, Managing Ethically, Small Group Breakout Exercise, and Be the Manager features provide opportunities for students to apply their learning to realistic scenarios in which a manager or organization faces a challenge, problem, or opportunity. Management Snapshots open each chapter by posing a related challenge and discussing how managers responded. Manager as a Person boxes focus on how real managers brought about change within their organizations.

Building Management Skills, Managing Ethically, Small Group Breakout Exercise, and Be the Manager features provide opportunities for students to apply their learning to realistic scenarios in which a manager or organization faces a challenge, problem, or opportunity.

Management Snapshots open each chapter by posing a related challenge and discussing how managers responded. Manager as a Person boxes focus on how real managers brought about change within their organizations. Small Business Examples ensure that students make clear connections between concepts and applications. End-of-chapter Management in Action questions and points for reflection ask students to research actual management issues and learn firsthand from practicing managers.

McGraw-Hill ToolsMcGraw-Hill smart learning tools begin with Connect, a highly reliable, easy-to-use homework and learning management solution. LearnSmart lets instructors measure student progress, comprehension, and retention and ensures instructors know which areas should be targeted. The ebook makes it easy for students to access reading material on smartphones and tables. SmartBook enables students to come to class with preassigned exposure and knowledge of key management theories and concepts and enables instructors to personalize content for each learner.

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The instructor's manual saves instructors' time and supports them in delivering the most effective course. A collection of feelings and beliefs attraction-selection-attrition ASA framework: A model that explains how personality may influence organizational culture conscientiousness: The tendency to be careful, scrupulous, and persevering emotional intelligence: Intense, relatively short-lived feelings external locus of control: The tendency to experience positive emotions and moods and to feel good about oneself and the rest of the world instrumental value: A mode of conduct that an individual seeks to follow internal locus of control: The collection of feelings and beliefs that managers have about their current jobs 5.

The Manager as a Person mood: A feeling or state of mind need for achievement: The extent to which an individual has a strong desire to perform challenging tasks well and to meet personal standards for excellence need for affiliation: The extent to which an individual is concerned about establishing and maintaining good interpersonal relations, being liked, and having other people get along need for power: The extent to which an individual desires to control or influence others negative affectivity: The tendency to experience negative emotions and moods, to feel distressed, and to be critical of oneself and others norms: Unwritten, informal codes of conduct that prescribe how people should act in particular situations and are considered important by most members of a group or organization openness to experience: The tendency to be original, have broad interests, be open to a wide range of stimuli, be daring, and take risks organizational citizenship behaviors OCBs: Behaviors that are not required of organizational members but that contribute to and are necessary for organizational efficiency, effectiveness, and competitive advantage organizational commitment: The collection of feelings and beliefs that managers have about their organization as a whole organizational culture: The shared set of beliefs, expectations, values, norms, and work routines that influence how individuals, groups, and teams interact with one another and cooperate to achieve organizational goals organizational socialization: Enduring tendencies to feel, think, and act in certain ways self-esteem: The degree to which individuals feel good about themselves and their capabilities terminal value: A lifelong goal or objective that an individual seeks to achieve value system: This chapter provides a strong appreciation of how the personal characteristics of managers influence the process of management in general, and organizational culture in particular.

Images of the Instructor PowerPoint slides can be found at the end of this chapter on page Management Snapshot pp. When Jess Lee was growing up in Hong Kong, she loved to draw.

She attended Stanford University, where she received a degree in computer science. After graduating, she got a job as a product manager at Google Maps.

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While working a Google, she became an avid user of the Polyvore website, which enables users to build sets or collages of products.

Impressed by her comments, Polyvore offered her a job and she accepted. Lee engaged in all manner of tasks to help Polyvore create a great user experience, ranging from coding and management to sales. Eventually, the founders appointed her CEO. Under her leadership, Polyvore became profitable. Although she is somewhat introverted, Lee has found her own leadership style that works well at Polyvore.

Lee sees Polyvore expanding beyond fashion and also expanding internationally. The Manager as a Person expanding internationally. The Manager as a Person I. Enduring Characteristics: Personality Traits Personality traits are enduring tendencies to feel, think, and act in certain ways. It is important to understand the personalities of managers because their personalities influence their behavior and their approach to managing people and resources. Each should be evaluated along a continuum.

Extraversion is the tendency to experience positive emotions and moods and feel good about oneself and the rest of the world. Being high on this trait can be an asset for managers whose jobs entail an especially high level of social interaction. Those low on this factor can be highly effective if excessive social interaction is not required by their job. Negative Affectivity is the tendency to experience negative emotions and moods, feel distressed, and be critical of others.

Those who are low on negative affectivity do not tend to experience many negative emotions and are less pessimistic and critical of themselves and others. Agreeableness is the tendency to get along well with others. Managers high on this continuum are likeable, tend to be affectionate, and care about other people. Those who are low may be somewhat distrustful of others, unsympathetic, uncooperative, and even at times antagonistic. See Figure 2.

Conscientiousness is the tendency to be careful, scrupulous, and persevering.

Managers who are high on this factor are organized and self-disciplined while those who are low may seem to lack self-direction and self-discipline. Openness to experience is the tendency to be original, have broad interests, be open to a wide range of stimuli, be daring, and take risks. Those high on this trait continuum like to take risks and sometimes LO Describe the various personality traits that affect how managers think, feel and behave.

Soon he started experimenting with different fabrics, testing their durability, comfort, and water resistance. Plank used his network of athletic contacts from playing on teams in high school, military school, and the University of Maryland to get the word out about the shirt. As business and orders picked up, Under Armour outgrew the its basement office and set up shop on Sharp Street in Baltimore. Under Armour is currently headquartered in a ,squarefoot complex.

It is a global company that produces apparel and accessories for women, men, and youth for athletics. Clearly Plank demonstrates that being original, daring, and taking risks while at the same time being highly determined, disciplined, and persevering can help managers and entrepreneurs succeed 9. The Manager as a Person against tough odds. People with an internal locus of control believe that they are responsible for their own fate and see their own actions and behaviors as being important and decisive determinants of future outcomes.

Self-esteem is the degree to which individuals feel good about themselves and their capabilities. Needs for achievement, affiliation and power have been extensively researched by psychologist David McClelland. The need for achievement is the extent to which an individual has a strong desire to perform challenging tasks well and to meet personal standards for excellence.

The need for affiliation is the extent to which an individual is concerned about establishing and maintaining good interpersonal relations, being liked and getting along with other people. The need for power is the extent to which an individual desires to control or influence others. Values, Attitudes, and Moods and Emotions A. Terminal and Instrumental 1. A terminal value is a personal conviction about lifelong goals or objectives while an instrumental value is a personal conviction about desired modes of The Manager as a Person conductor ways of behaving.

Terminal values often lead to the formation of norms, which are informal rules of conduct for behaviors considered to be important within an organization. Attitudes An attitude is a collection of feelings and beliefs. Two of the most important attitudes in this context are: Job Satisfaction is the collection of feelings and beliefs that managers have about their current job.

Managers who are satisfied with their jobs are more likely to perform organizational citizenship behaviors OCBs. OCBs are behaviors that are not required but contribute to organizational efficiency, effectiveness, and gaining a competitive advantage. A growing source of dissatisfaction for many lower and middle-level managers and employees is the threat of unemployment and increased workloads from downsizing. The ways in which layoffs are handled is important for both layoff victims and survivors.

Organizational commitment is the collection of feelings and beliefs that managers have about their organization as a whole. With organizational commitment, managers: Believe in what their organizations are doing b. Are proud of what the organization stands for c.

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Feel a high degree of loyalty toward their organizations. Whereas some moving companies hire a lot of temporary help in the summer to meet seasonal demand, 60 percent of Gentle Giant employees are employed full-time.

Because the demand for moving services is lower in the winter, Gentle Giant uses this time to train and develop employees. Having fun and getting to know each other as people are also important at Gentle Giant. The company holds parties and arranges outings for employees to sporting events, amusement parks, and other local attractions. The Manager as a Person LO Define organizational culture, and C.

Moods and Emotions 1. A mood is a feeling or state of mind. Emotions are more intense than moods, are more short-lived, and are usually linked to a specific cause. Managers with high levels of EI are able to prevent their emotions from getting in the way of making effective decisions.

EI helps managers perform the interpersonal roles of figurehead, leader, and liaison. Emotional intelligence helps managers understand and relate well to other people. Organizational Culture Organizational culture describes the set of beliefs, expectations, values, norms, and work routines that influence how members of an organization relate to one another and work together to achieve organizational goals. When members share an intense commitment to goals, a strong organizational culture exists.

Managers and Organizational Culture 1. Managers play a particularly important part in The Manager as a Person influencing organizational culture. This is most evident in the start-up of new companies 2.

Management researcher Benjamin Schneider developed a model called the attraction-selection- attrition ASA framework, which posits that entrepreneurs tend to hire employees whose personalities are similar to their own. The Role of Values and Norms in Organizational Culture Shared values, as well as shared norms, play a particularly important role in organizational culture. Terminal values signify what an organization and its employees are trying to accomplish, and instrumental values guide how the organization and its members achieve organizational goals.

Values of the founder: From the ASA model previously discussed, it is clear that founders can have a profound and long-lasting effect on organizational culture. Organizational Socialization: As a result, organizational values and norms are internalized. Ceremonies and rites: These are formal events that recognize incidents of importance to the organization as a whole and to specific employees. The most common rites that organizations use to transmit cultural norms and values to their members are rites of passage, of integration, and of enhancement.

See Table 2. Rites of passage determine how individuals enter, advance within, or leave an organization. Rites of integration build and reinforce common bonds among organizational member c. Rites of enhancement let organizations publicly recognize and reward employee contributions and thus strengthen their commitment to organizational values.

Stories and language: Stories frequently told within an organization, either fact or fiction, provide important clues about values and norms. The slang or jargon that people within an organization use to frame and describe events also provides important clues about norms and values.

Culture and Managerial Action Culture influences the way in which managers perform their four main functions. In an innovative organizational culture, top managers are likely to develop a flexible approach to planning and to encourage participation by subordinates. In contrast, managers in a conservative organizational culture are likely to emphasize top- down planning. Because they value creativity, managers in an innovative culture are likely to create an organic structure that is flat and in which authority is decentralized.

In contrast, managers in a conservative culture are likely to create a well-defined hierarchy of authority and establish clear reporting relationships. In an innovative culture, managers are likely to lead by example, encourage employees to take risks and experiment, and to be supportive regardless of success or failure. In a conservative culture, they are likely to use management by objectives, constantly monitor progress toward goals, and oversee their every move.

Managers in innovative cultures tend to recognize that there are multiple, potential paths to success and that failure must be accepted in order for creativity to thrive.

Therefore, they are more concerned that employees be flexible and take risks and less concerned about their adherence to pre- determined routines and goals. In contrast, managers in more conservative cultures emphasize caution and maintenance of the status quo.

The Manager as a Person Beginning with bestseller Emotional Intelligence, Goleman has sought to strip away conventional notions of what it means to be intelligent by examining how key personality traits can lead to measurable success. Although his background is in psychology, he has become a powerful voice in the corporate world.

Below are excerpts from an interview with Dr. Industry observers often complain about the dichotomy in the business world today. The first analysis of the organizational life was conducted in a sociological tradition by Max Weber and Talcott Parsons, and it pretty much ignored to emotional reality of work.

It analyzed the workplace and organizational dynamics as though emotions were not part of the equation.

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We can either acknowledge this fact or not. You maintain that companies perform better if top managers have emotional intelligence, but the business world is rife with stories of CEOs and top managers who have been wildly successful even though they are insensitive jerks.

If emotional intelligence is so important, how do you account for their successes? In fact, the insurance industry did exactly that study. The researchers looked at moderately successful companies of the same size and evaluated CEOs on their emotional intelligence and leadership abilities. They found that the more these bosses exhibited empathy, initiative, and a drive to achieve, the more profitable the companies were.

The Manager as a Person Is it there ever a point at which someone is too old to learn these competencies? You are never too old to learn emotional intelligence. In fact, people tend to improve in emotional intelligence over the course of a lifetime, because life lesions often make people wiser in this domain.

Thy get more comfortable with themselves and other people. But someone who wants to a leader needs to have a relative high level of these abilities. A business school that wants to help its students achieve high leadership levels either has to select people who have already developed these abilities, or it has to help its students to learn them.

Soft skills have hard consequences. Lecture Enhancer 2. The only child has similar, yet often more intense personality traits. The middle child is a master negotiator who never had his parents to himself, and endured hand-me- downs.

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The good news is he can compromise, share and negotiate. Leman describes the baby of the family as manipulative, social, outgoing, and a natural salesperson. She is the child who got her siblings in trouble while she was cute, helpless and got away with murder.

A fourth birth-order position, identified by Michael Maniacci, a clinical psychologist and member of the faculty at the Adler School of Professional Psychology in Chicago, is the second born.

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The second born tends to be more rebellious, non-conforming and independent than the middle child. After reading these descriptions, most either download into the birth-order concept as a perfect description of their family or discount it.

The Manager as a Person Sex of children is an important variable in the birth-order equation. Maniacci says: That impacts birth-order roles.

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There is not much distinction between being a girl and a boy. Conversely, if Dad has short hair and Mom has long, and Mom stays at home and Dad works, the boy holds the role of the oldest born male and the girl the oldest born female. Physical differences play a role too. If the oldest child is physically or psychologically challenged, the second child usually takes on the role of the firstborn.