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TAKING SIDES BOOK

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This touchingly realistic story explores the divided loyalties of a Hispanic basketball player who has recently moved from a poor neighborhood to a more affluent. About the Book. Fourteen-year-old Lincoln Mendoza, an aspiring basketball player, must come to terms with his divided loyalties when he. Visit Scholastic, the world's largest children's book publisher. Whether you need a classic kids book or classroom-proven teaching materials, discover it at.


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Country:United Arab Emirates
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Taking Sides book. Read reviews from the world's largest community for readers. Lincoln is in a jam when his basketball team at his new school--where. Gary Soto's first book for young readers, Baseball in April and Other Stories, won the California Library Association's Beatty Award and was named an ALA Best. Lincoln Mendoza remains loyal to his former school’s basketball team, even after he moves from the barrio to the suburbs and plays for his new school’s team. “This touchingly realistic story explores the divided loyalties of a Hispanic basketball player who has recently moved.

The only question is, Which side are you on in the struggle against the violence that is white supremacy and policing? Taking Sides supplies an ethical compass and militant map of the terrain, arguing not for reform of structurally brutal institutions but rather for their abolition. The authors offer tools to hone strategies and tactics of resistance, and hold out the promise of robust, tangible solidarity across racial and other lines, because in the battle for systemic transformation, there are no outside agitators. It brings deep thinking about recent flash points into ongoing dialogues about leadership, strategy, and infrastructure in ways that shed new light on difficult questions. Taking Sides is a sharp, brilliant tool for activists on the ground. Alliances and the problem with ally politics, decolonization demands, a defense of riots, exposing gender violence, fighting back against police violence, and contesting white supremacy are among the timely issues presented in militant terms. The diversity of the authors gives depth to First Nations, African American, and immigrant views of the North American reality.

This is a very good novel written by Gary Soto. Nov 20, Alexis Hull rated it it was amazing. This book was probably the best book I've ever read. It is so good with the descriptions and the feeling. As well of the dialogue. Then having a guy break in his house, with a girl he liked, but couldn't tell. Having a hurt foot, coach being mean about it. Then having to play against his own team.

This book is way more than a 5-star rating. May 28, America Saenz added it. Lincoln Mendoza is an eighth grade Hispanic boy who used to play basketball for his old school, Franklin Junior High. His Latino populated neighborhood and his school were not one of the best ones out there, as it was very poor and filled with many crimes. One day, Lincoln's house is broken into and him and his mom move into a neighborhood of white people, where the everything is much nicer and there is much less crimes.

He makes new friends at his new school, Columbus. One day, he injures himse Lincoln Mendoza is an eighth grade Hispanic boy who used to play basketball for his old school, Franklin Junior High. One day, he injures himself and cannot play against his old school. All the time he is out and not playing basketball makes him homesick and he misses his friends, his school, and everything.

He begins to reflect upon himself and if he is still loyal to his buddies at home, and true to his true Mexican self. This book is great, especially for those of Mexican heritage. It makes you really connect with the protagonist of the book, even if your heritage isn't Mexican because it is about staying true to who you are.

I would recommend it to those who like stories they can connect to in several ways.

Taking Sides: And Related Readings

By reading a story about something that can happen on real life, one can unlock the meaning and message behind it. May 13, Frankie rated it it was amazing. The main characters in my book is Lincoln Mendoza, he is Mexican and like to play basketball he's the all-star of his team. Lincoln had moved schools due to someone breaking into his house so they moved out of the barrio.

Him and his mom and dog had moved to a more decent neighborhood where Lincolns friends thought it was rich people and white people. His friends said that Lincoln was changing a lot since he moved from the barrio and from schools but Lincoln did not agree with it because he said The main characters in my book is Lincoln Mendoza, he is Mexican and like to play basketball he's the all-star of his team.

Taking Sides

His friends said that Lincoln was changing a lot since he moved from the barrio and from schools but Lincoln did not agree with it because he said that even though he moved to a different neighborhood that doesn't mean that he had changed. The main conflict in the book is when Lincoln hurts his knee playing basketball with his crush Monica and he is worried that he won't be able to play against his old school.

My personal reaction to my book was normal because I can connect to the way they talk and the things they do because me and my family get along like that. I personally rate this book with 5 stars and recommend anyone that can relate to this in any type of way. Mar 11, Terry Marzell added it Shelves: Soto, Gary.

Taking Sides. Orlando, Florida: Harcourt, Inc. Target Audience: Ages Reading Level: When eighth-grader Lincoln Mendoza moves from the inner city to the suburbs, he is forced to adjust to a predominately white school filled with upper-middle class students.

Thi Soto, Gary. This coming-of-age story with a Hispanic protagonist would appeal to boys interested in sports. I appreciated the inclusion of Spanish-language dialogue which lent an air of authenticity to the narrative.

Apr 15, Taylor Manrique rated it liked it Shelves: Soto takes readers through the story of the harsh reality that young Lincoln is going through in his life. Lincoln is a shining star on the basketball court, he loves the game and playing with his best friends. Living in a violent and crime-bound neighborhood, Lincoln and his mother are always faced with the threat of someone breaking into their home, which has happened before.

After their house has been broken into once again, Lincoln's mother decides it is time to move to a safer neighborhood, Soto takes readers through the story of the harsh reality that young Lincoln is going through in his life.

After their house has been broken into once again, Lincoln's mother decides it is time to move to a safer neighborhood, unfortunately meaning Lincoln must attend a different school. Saddened by the move away from his team and friends, Lincoln must learn to adjust to his new school, especially if he wants to continue playing basketball.

As if the moves wasn't enough Lincoln's new coach treats him unfairly, he injures his knee, and must deal with being the only Hispanic kid at an predominately white school. Lincoln is forced to go through finding himself in this new place, while still trying to keep his old home as a part of his life. This story is perfect for readers of this age level middle-level to high school , as the story comes from the perspective of someone their age.

This story can be relatable for readers who have experienced a move and being the new kid, and the struggles that come with that. Readers can also relate to the passion Lincoln feels towards his sport, especially since this is the age when sports become competitive and a big part of young adult's lives.

Readers of the Hispanic decent can relate to this story the most, probably because of the fact that Lincoln is a Hispanic male that struggles with being the minority of his new school.

I was really able to relate to Lincoln when it came to being so passionate about athletics, as I was and still am. I know what it is like to deal with adversity when all you want to do is play and be the best at what you are doing. Although I enjoyed the concept of this story, I felt that it dragged on too much, when it could have been resolved chapters prior.

By making this book shorter and getting to the resolution faster, I believe it would make it easier for readers to read and enjoy. This book can be used in the classroom as a reader's theater, where students can pick characters and a scene from the book to be acted out in front of the class.

This way emotions and perspectives of the characters can be understood better. May 31, Dominic Romo rated it really liked it.

Taking Sides is about Lincoln Mendoza, a Hispanic boy living in a very violent part of San Francisco, with frequent robberies and shootings. After their house is robbed, his mom takes it as the last straw and decides to move into a safer, white, neighborhood. Lincoln played basketball for Franklin Junior High School, but after the move he has to adjust to the new environment and his coach, whom highly dislikes Lincoln. He has a fight with his best friend Tony from his old neighborhood, and has trouble with girls and getting playing time on his basketball team.

This book is very similar to The Absolutely True Story of a Part-Time Indian because like Lincoln, Junior from Part-Time Indian also moves school from harsh conditions, joins the basketball team, is not accepted by the white people, has a fight with his best friend and has issues with girls from the new school and in the end having to play his old team and friends. Readers that can relate to Hispanic culture, struggles with barrios and adjusting to new environments with many issues will truly feel connected.

It would be hard for most to connect emotionally with the story if they have not had similar struggles or can not understand some common Spanish frases phrases. Mar 02, Jalen rated it it was amazing.

Lincoln Mendoza is a star basketball player for Franklin Junior High in the barrio of San Francisco, but when his house is broken into, his mother decides they should move to a better neighborhood the prosperous white suburb of Sycamore ten miles away.

Lincoln likes the change at first, but soon he begins to miss his old friends and school. There's more to Lincoln's plight than being homesick, though. He has a fight with Tony, his best friend from the barrio; his divorced mother has a white boyf Lincoln Mendoza is a star basketball player for Franklin Junior High in the barrio of San Francisco, but when his house is broken into, his mother decides they should move to a better neighborhood the prosperous white suburb of Sycamore ten miles away.

He has a fight with Tony, his best friend from the barrio; his divorced mother has a white boyfriend whom Lincoln dislikes; his basketball coach doesn't like him; he hurts his knee; and his new house is broken into. What else can go wrong?

Well, he has a fight with Monica, a girl from his new school whom he really likes, and his coach benches him for the big game between his new school and his old one. When the big game finally takes place, it forces Lincoln to figure out who he is and where he belongs. The bet was on a basketball game. And Lincoln got lucky and won the bet by a close game. But Franklin didn't care because he wanted Franklin junior high to win.

He did it because he only really liked one person on Columbus high.

Book taking sides

We know this because the main character, Lincoln listens to the rapper Ice-T who began rapping in Moreover, the book states that Lincoln was listening to him on a cassette tape, which were popular around that time. Lincoln also lived in Mission District before he moved to Sycamore California.

It is lincoln because it is all about him picking which team he wants to represent and what team he wants to win. He is because throughout the whole story him and Lincoln didn't get along at all.

And he was always on Lincolns back and nobody liked him. Denouement- Franklin junior high beats Franklin junior high. Secondary characters- Monica, yutius, tony, james, roy, flaco, vickey, beatrice Oct 19, Gail rated it liked it. I read this book to become more familiar with a level S book. Linc Mendoza's story is one that will make students stop and think as they read his story of finding a way to "fit in" to a new school, a new neighborhood, and a new way of life after moving from the city to a suburban neighborhood in San Francisco.

While his mom seems happier, Linc has a hard time knowing where he belongs until the basketball team i Taking Sides is included in Jennifer Serravallo's Independent Reading Assessment kit. While his mom seems happier, Linc has a hard time knowing where he belongs until the basketball team in his new school faces off against his old school. This book is a complex story with characters who are real, somewhat unpredictable, and make you think about what you would do if you were faced with taking sides.

May 14, Oscar rated it it was amazing. Lincoln goes to Franklin high. He moved from the Mission District of San Francisco, an urban barrio, to sycamore, a pleasant suburban town with tree-lined streets. Lincoln hurt his knee and doesn't want to play but the coach is making him play. I think this book was good because this actually happens to people. Yes I would recommend this book to other people because it could be a real life situation for people.

On page 79 it says Coach " I hurt my knee, its pretty bad.

BERGHAHN BOOKS : Taking Sides: Ethics, Politics, And Fieldwork In Anthropology

You don't have time to be hurt. Nov 02, Diana rated it did not like it.

Read this with my students for the past two years. No more. It is horribly boring. Students just glare at me whenever I tell them that we need to "get through this book". I don't disagree with them.

The venacular is dated and the story plods along. Never again. Feb 12, Maria rated it really liked it. This novel is a fast read. It is about boy named Lincoln and not being able to fit into an affluent school especially when his coach does not seem to like him due to his race. This novel is also about friendships, basketball, family and relationships. Apr 01, Lexie Frensley rated it liked it.

I have many questions as to why this book was included in our 7th grade curriculum. It is better suited for th grade readers. The plot is very thin, but my students definitely enjoyed reading a book from a Latino boy's perspective. Oct 02, Luis Espinoza rated it it was amazing.

I enjoyed it. Easy read and good solid plot. Touches on racial and socioeconomic issues lightly, but well for a younger audience. Precuela de "Cruzando el pacifico". Ambos libros se encuentran entre mis favoritos, me gusta mucho la manera de escribir de Gary Soto, con una familiaridad y calidez que me recuerdan a mi hogar.

Apr 19, Danial rated it really liked it.

Cool, This iS like Real Life. Jan 24, Jodi rated it liked it. The protagonist is not entirely likable, which is honest and good.

Sep 26, James rated it liked it. The main character, Lincoln, has to face an extremely mean coach, a man breaking into their new house and moving from his old home. To view it, click here. This book was probably the best book I've ever read.

Series: Taking Sides

It is so good with the descriptions and the feeling. As well of the dialogue. Then having a guy break in his house, with a girl he liked, but couldn't tell. Having a hurt foot, coach being mean about it. Then having to play against his own team. This book is way more than a 5-star rating. May 28, America Saenz added it Lincoln Mendoza is an eighth grade Hispanic boy who used to play basketball for his old school, Franklin Junior High.

His Latino populated neighborhood and his school were not one of the best ones out there, as it was very poor and filled with many crimes. One day, Lincoln's house is broken into and him and his mom move into a neighborhood of white people, where the everything is much nicer and there is much less crimes. He makes new friends at his new school, Columbus.

Sides book taking

One day, he injures himse Lincoln Mendoza is an eighth grade Hispanic boy who used to play basketball for his old school, Franklin Junior High. One day, he injures himself and cannot play against his old school. All the time he is out and not playing basketball makes him homesick and he misses his friends, his school, and everything.

He begins to reflect upon himself and if he is still loyal to his buddies at home, and true to his true Mexican self. This promises to be a handbook for every social justice activist. The day we connect our grievances and put ourselves on the line for each other as accomplices is when the system s of domination will start to crumble. This book contributes to bringing that day closer.

Taking Sides shows us the choir of angels singing the song of solidarity and justice. I can think of no better time for our collective voice to be heard. This book symbolizes the first perfect notes. Collectively, the writings serve as essential tools for those seeking to build a new world in the shell of the old.