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REDIRECT TIMOTHY WILSON EBOOK

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Penguin Books Ltd. Paperback. Book Condition: new. BRAND. NEW, Redirect: Changing the Stories We Live By, Timothy Wilson,. "Redirect" by Timothy D. "There are few academics who write with as much grace and wisdom as Timothy Wilson. REDIRECT is a masterpiece." -Malcolm GladwellWhat. The world-renowned psychologist Timothy Wilson shows us how to redirect the stories ISBN Share. ebook. Trade Paperback. download Book.


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Editorial Reviews. Review. "There are few academics who write with as much grace and wisdom as Timothy Wilson. Redirect is a masterpiece."―Malcolm. Redirect: The Surprising New Science of Psychological Change by Timothy Wilson. Read online, or download in secure EPUB format. Redirect: Changing the Stories We Live By by Timothy D. Wilson. Read online, or download in secure EPUB format.

Shelves: non-fiction Redirect started strong, got weak enough in the middle that I was debating between 2 and 3 stars as I trudged through, and then got quite strong again at the end. The initial argument of the book is twofold. First: a lot of the psychological interventions to help people anything from helping first responder deal with traumatic events to keeping kids from getting pregnant are either useless or counterproductie. We can't know without experimental testing. Second: a particular kind of approach cal Redirect started strong, got weak enough in the middle that I was debating between 2 and 3 stars as I trudged through, and then got quite strong again at the end. Second: a particular kind of approach called story-editing that depends on altering the way people construct their own narratives can be surprisingly helpful at solving psychological problem.

But I won't. Since I've actually read it, I can instead drop tidbits into letters and conversation—no doubt a better technique anyway. This is a good quote, for instance, that Wilson uses: Feb 03, Morgan Blackledge rated it liked it.

This book is very useful particularly if you are a psychology clinician, social worker, conscientious parent, educator, curious human being etc , as it a covers just enough experimental and statistical method to activate the "educated sceptic" module b rigorously shreds non evidence based interventions such as DARE and Scared Straight c introduces us to a broadly applicable method for adaptive personal and social change called "story editing" and effectively presents evidence for its effi This book is very useful particularly if you are a psychology clinician, social worker, conscientious parent, educator, curious human being etc , as it a covers just enough experimental and statistical method to activate the "educated sceptic" module b rigorously shreds non evidence based interventions such as DARE and Scared Straight c introduces us to a broadly applicable method for adaptive personal and social change called "story editing" and effectively presents evidence for its efficacy.

So why the 3 stars as opposed to 4 or 5? Because the book very much like the authors other book Strangers To Our Selves suffers a bit from a stuffy and dry presentation style. Steven Pinker, Robert Sapolsky and Jonathan Haidt can present pages of complex, abstract academic subject matter and have you laughing and crying all the way.

This for me is the gold standard. This book is good, but it goes down a little like broccoli after a milkshake. I'd say this is very worthwhile reading if you're very interested in social psychology and I am, and so should you.

But if you're not, read it any way but consider yourself warned. View all 4 comments. Do not read this book. Unless you're someone with conservative US values and like to see those prejudices confirmed. The author mixes cherry picked research examples with his own personal opinions and morals. The actual science is extremely thin and can be summarized in literally words as the author does at the end of the book.

Additionally, ab Do not read this book. That should be in a completely different book. Don't bother with this. Nov 29, George Rodriguez rated it really liked it Shelves: Wilson is built around the concept of Story Editing, which he describes as using changes, or edits, in the stories we use to understand ourselves and the social world around us, to make lasting changes in our lives and the lives of others.

Wilson discusses shaping our personal narratives and expands from there to the topics of raising kids, preventing teen pregnancy, teenage violence, alcohol and drug abuse, prejudice and the achievement gap.

His chapter on raising kids seemed the weakest, especially the minimal sufficiency principal, which I took as too fine a line when trying to be neither too harsh or too lenient when disciplining children.

However, his other chapters provide interesting ideas on how story editing can be used to counter what would seem to be intractable personal and social problems.

My three main take-aways were: Wilson's clear-eyed examination of the problems with policy makers, self-help authors and non-psychologists who rely on common sense to solve problems and fall into the trap of equaling correlation with causation. His chapter on prejudice was very stimulating, including the insight that when it comes to race we overestimate our differences and underestimate what we have in common. The Stereotype Threat discussed in chapter 9 was a profound discovery and his use of studies and possible solutions emphasizing positive aspects of the race and positive role models was one of the stronger chapters.

In sum, Mr. Wilson has written a book on change supported by scientifically-validated studies that counter so much of the accepted wisdom and programs that exist today. While much of the book is dedicated to fighting large-scale, social issues, there is enough material on personal change to make this book a recommended choice for every reader. Mar 05, Ben Thurley rated it really liked it. Basically this is a book with two ideas.

The first, that social and psychological interventions should be rigorously evaluated for their effectiveness and that randomised control trials are perhaps the best way to measure this. This approach to psychological Basically this is a book with two ideas. This approach to psychological change is built on three assumptions that Wilson enumerates near the close of the book: Second, these interpretations are not always set in stone, and in fact can be redirected with just the right approach.

Third, small changes in interpretations can have self-sustaining effects, leading to long-lasting changes in behavior. It's a fascinating and thoroughly researched work. There are also some helpful tips for parents. Nov 03, Joseph Adelizzi, Jr. This review has been hidden because it contains spoilers. To view it, click here. I came away from reading Redirect by Timothy D. Wilson feeling confirmed, confused, and comforted.

Confirmation came from reading evidence supportive of my beliefs that: Confusion came because of an inclination towards what feels a bit like Lockean Empiricism. Are we blank slates at bir I came away from reading Redirect by Timothy D.

Are we blank slates at birth, shaped ultimately by friends, family, and the media? But what happens when two blank slates — or slates still not completely painted - meet? Who reads and who writes? I have no doubt I was influenced by my friends in a most positive manner , and I have no doubts my kids were influenced by their friends again in a most positive manner. On the surface that feels like we were blank slates painted by others. What made us choose what we chose?

Our internal narrative? Did that internal narrative start as a blank slate as well? Weren't we making choices to shape that narrative? I think maybe I need to go read some more existentialists to quell my nausea.

Finally, comfort came from knowing there are social scientists like Mr.

Timothy D Wilson

Wilson geepers! My internal narrative precludes me from anything but full disclosure — I was a Psychology major in college. Could you tell? Aug 30, A. Besides discussing the actual strategies, Wilson devotes many chapters to problems where they may be well utilized.

Chapters cover a slew of social problems such as underage violence, teen pregnancies, racial discrimination, drug and alcohol abuse, becoming better parents, and closing the achievement gap between students. However, positive behavior are unlikely to come about without positive thoughts. I found the book to be both helpful and informational. Aug 24, Claudia rated it liked it. Most interesting. The author's emphasis on testing "Does a given intervention actually help, or do we just think that it should?

Wait, it's counterproductive! Test, test, test So often, something that seems like it should work just doesn't. I confess, I was a bit disappointed only in that the author did not address how to change patterns of behavior that I Most interesting. I confess, I was a bit disappointed only in that the author did not address how to change patterns of behavior that I'm particularly concerned with.

Learning about dealing with at-risk youth was interesting, but not particularly relevant to me. I'd really like to see how his approach would work with people who are deep in denial about something, or are not being honest with themselves in some way, but that doesn't get more than a passing mention about how people like to think of themselves as good guys, and they will go to amazing lengths to rationalize their behavior. That's a quibble, though. Overall, I'm glad I read it.

Timothy ebook redirect wilson

Jan 17, Thomas Edmund rated it it was amazing. Quarrels with the title aside Redirect is a great book - perhaps a little heavy on the science I guess thats one word in the title that makes sense but worth trucking through nonetheless Redirect reads as a debunk of conventional 'common sense' studies with an aperteif of story editing.

Story editing is effectively positive thinking if I dare be simplistic with some added complexity. The real strength of the book is the debunking. Most people who have completed a reputible psychology course kn Quarrels with the title aside Redirect is a great book - perhaps a little heavy on the science I guess thats one word in the title that makes sense but worth trucking through nonetheless Redirect reads as a debunk of conventional 'common sense' studies with an aperteif of story editing.

Most people who have completed a reputible psychology course know that many self-help, faddish and alternative programs have no scientific basis whatsoever and in fact some can be harmful and Wilson presents the most succinct and convincing argument against 'common sense' social interventions and advocates for the use of evidence based interventions, rather then doing the social work equivalent of 'blood-letting' I'm not sure if the book will be accessible to mainstream readers, but anyone keen on psychology and society will enjoy.

I want to like this book but the author is so totally in love with his story editing theory he refuses to acknowledge the real lived sexism and racism people experience every day. His insistence we all just need to imagine better comes across as the view of one in privilege. Mar 08, Deb rated it it was amazing. Program, respectively work. After all, with all the publicity and praise they get, they surely seem to be accomplishing their goals, right? Story editing--the focus of this book--is just one of those promising approaches.

Based on helping people rewrite, revise, and redirect their personal narratives, the story editing approach refocuses people on the aspects of their selves and their lives that they most value. This approach realizes that "small changes in interpretations can have self-sustaining effects, leading to long-lasting changes in behavior. And, the three-step approach to achieving this goals involves: Clearly, it's time for changing how we approach change. Aug 07, Sean rated it really liked it Shelves: This is a well-focused book from an established academic in the field of Social Psychology.

His premise is pretty simple: The balance of the book applies this story-editing perspective to a variety of social issues: The persistent theme here is that it's quite common to create large, expensive social programs without ever testing in a rigorous and valid way whether they actually work! Happily there are also some examples of programs that have been tested and that do work. One interesting example: The analysis suggests that some amount of self-affirmation can help counter threats to self-esteem but you need to read the book for the deeper background of what's going on here.

Nov 21, Eric Schreiber rated it liked it. While the premise of Redirect is that the story people tell themselves about a situation can change their long-term outlook on life, it spends a lot of time simply focusing on how multitudes of intervention programs don't work.

Wilson is a strong believer in testing programs using a proper scientific method, with randomly selected treatment and control groups, and he makes this point over and over again.

He digs into closing-the-gap education programs, teen pregnancy programs, school dropout pro While the premise of Redirect is that the story people tell themselves about a situation can change their long-term outlook on life, it spends a lot of time simply focusing on how multitudes of intervention programs don't work.

He digs into closing-the-gap education programs, teen pregnancy programs, school dropout programs, drug programs, violence programs, deliquency programs, and so on. He does point out how some of the most successful programs, that have been truly proven to work, do leverage the idea of story editing, but it almost seems an extra "oh by the way" at the end of each chapter rather than the focus.

In reading the preview of the book, I was expecting it to be more about the reader - individual cases of story editing and how it can be applied in one's day-to-day life. There is a bit of it at the beginning, and the final chapter does send the reader off with some focused suggestions, but much of the book are about the broad programs, which ones work and which don't, with a guess at the "why".

Certainly an interesting read, but not what I was hoping for. Apr 17, Derrick Trimble rated it liked it. There really is nothing new under the sun.

Timothy Wilson

I dove into the book with high expectations. After all, Malcolm Gladwell called Redirect a 'masterpiece. Setting the foundation of the principles of redirecting, Wilson moved on to the validity question, and then on to refreshing look at shaping our narratives. The candor and unabashed evisceration of the self-help and actualization movement had me going "Yeah", "See," and left me with a sense of self-satis There really is nothing new under the sun.

The candor and unabashed evisceration of the self-help and actualization movement had me going "Yeah", "See," and left me with a sense of self-satisfaction. Apart for the chapter on parenting, the subsequent chapters were more geared toward field specialists for teen pregnancy, addictions, teen violence, prejudice, and biases in the educational systems that impact achievement.

Redirect: The Surprising New Science of Psychological Change

While each chapter was informative, I didn't always pull something from the pages that was relevant to a general public. If given an opportunity to chat with Mr. Wilson, I'd have to ask him if he would change anything to his chapter on prejudice.

Again, very informative and offering some good insight.

Redirect by Timothy D. Wilson | Little, Brown and Company

However, I wonder if his own views are skewed Apr 03, Carielyn Mills rated it really liked it. Mar 17, Ned rated it really liked it. Which one is the most effective intervention? Does it work? The book starts by explaining that for a conclusions from a study to represent the truth the study should pick the participants in random manner. Several examples present why this fact measures causation vs correlation. The author then focuses on several well publicized or adopted programs.

Each chapter represents a different social behavior and it is mainly focused on kids. Although the book mentions how to apply it to adults every now Which one is the most effective intervention? Although the book mentions how to apply it to adults every now and then. I agree with the author that raising responsible kids is the best way to decrease crime, drug use and increase education levels and income.

It just caught me by surprise how the full book was about the teenage behaviors with several other examples. I liked the summaries at the end of the chapters called "using it". Overall descent read and it's good for parents with kids that are getting in school or are teenagers. Dec 11, Jenny rated it liked it Shelves: I like the insight in this book and the refreshing approach of story-editing.

I think it might be a bit oversimplified - whenever I read books like this, I am always depressed by the fact that so many little things can influence people's behaviors other than themselves. We bend in the direction of least resistance. I would like to take this idea further and possibly in a completely different direction; in particular, how most initiatives and programs don't work specifically because they focus I like the insight in this book and the refreshing approach of story-editing.

I would like to take this idea further and possibly in a completely different direction; in particular, how most initiatives and programs don't work specifically because they focus on outcomes as opposed to process. Wilson discusses how people internalize stories about themselves, and getting them to internalize strong positive stories is the best possible thing we can do - but still we measure success in terms of performance outcomes and make this very apparent.

I don't know how to get around this necessity, but I would like to see people learn how to really enjoy themselves, and really enjoy making themselves better people. Mar 13, David Tendo rated it liked it. I didn't get as much out of this as I thought I would and the cover is actually quite deceiving. Don't get me wrong, this is an absolutely fascinating and thought-provoking read; extensively researched and referenced, but I didn't feel that there were any practical applications for the findings and it does nothing to "redirect" your thinking.

Wilson mentions the "story-editing" method a lot, but he doesn't actually go into it in any great detail or explain how to use it, he does touch on it brie I didn't get as much out of this as I thought I would and the cover is actually quite deceiving. Wilson mentions the "story-editing" method a lot, but he doesn't actually go into it in any great detail or explain how to use it, he does touch on it briefly in the first chapter, but seems to abandon it for the rest of the book, which is disappointing because I felt that was the most interesting part of his argument.

So it starts off well, but from the second chapter onward it spends too much time being a critical analysis of statistics and current issues very much like the book "Freakonomics" than an intelligent treatise on a potentially ground-breaking psychological technique. Feb 06, Cheryl Keller rated it it was amazing. An engaging book that gave me more critical questions to ask about social and personal improvement programs, and offered easy-to-understand, and scientifically sound approaches to some of the tougher challenges in our society, like preventing teenage pregnancy and reducing prejudice.

The author makes the point that some of the most widely-accepted social programs have been developed using "common sense," but often they aren't effective and sometimes they even make the problem worse. Yet, the p An engaging book that gave me more critical questions to ask about social and personal improvement programs, and offered easy-to-understand, and scientifically sound approaches to some of the tougher challenges in our society, like preventing teenage pregnancy and reducing prejudice.

Yet, the punchline of the book, for me, was very grounded in common sense: If we can do so in a way that draws us closer to other people, so much the better, given how important social relationships are to happiness. Nov 14, Melissa Namba rated it it was amazing Shelves: I love, love, loved this book!

It is a book that I know I will need to revisit on a regular basis to help me remember and learn how to correctly story edit. I am a junior high teacher and I try to use the story editing technique, but it really takes a lot of thought and consideration.

I have been lucky because the parents that I have spoken to about using it as a technique are very receptive to the ideas and approaches. I know that I will make mistakes in the story editing, but that is why I kno I love, love, loved this book! I know that I will make mistakes in the story editing, but that is why I know I will re visit this book on a regular basis. I wish Wilson would actually write a companion book to this and make it a Teaching Manual.

Classroom management is the most difficult thing for a teacher to master, and this has many useful gems in it! Oct 04, Anders Brabaek rated it really liked it Shelves: Firstly, preach the importance of testing social and psychological interventions, and not relying on common sense. This may sound boring, but it isn't; Wilson manages to thoroughly shows the dangers of even the most common of common sense - and that is thought provoking.

Secondly, show how, what Wilson coins, Story Editing, we can efficiently help people in various scenarios. Many of the scenarios relate to teaching and helping youths.

If you Writing: If you are like me, you will be seriously frustrated that there such simple, yet effective tools available, and they aren't deployed on a large scale. James Pennebaker: Apr 07, Lisa Frieden rated it liked it Shelves: This is a book of social psychology written by a psych professor. I have to be honest - I've always found psych books slippery.

However, Redirect was pretty straightforward. After Wilson explains the story editing approach, he spends the rest of the book discussing a myriad failed programs from DARE to IQ testing and proposes a different approach to these problems of social psychology, namely Redirect.

Oct 14, Paul rated it it was amazing Shelves: I have been looking for some insight into the teen mindset. I have felt for some time that "common sense" that many parent by has limits on results.

This book sorts out the facts from the "common sense" parents. This book is well grounded in rigorous studies and their social application on both social and individual levels. I am a big believer in leading kids rather than beating them figuratively speaking of course.

Leading is much harder than just setting rules and then setting rigid enforcement. T I have been looking for some insight into the teen mindset. That smacks of management actually and no parent should strive to manage a family when they can do so much more by leading the family.

This book tells a parent how to lead your children and get good parenting results without conflict. I hope this book is the start of a flood of well researched follow up titles.

Timothy ebook redirect wilson

There are no discussion topics on this book yet. Readers also enjoyed. Self Help. About Timothy D. Timothy D. Wilson is the Sherrell J. Aston Professor of Psychology at the University of Virginia. Wilson is also the coauthor of the best-selling social psychology textbook, now in its Timothy D. Wilson is also the coauthor of the best-selling social psychology textbook, now in its seventh edition. Books by Timothy D. Trivia About Redirect: Redirect proposes a radical new view of the world.

It also offers a range of practical advice - that has, crucially, been tested scientifically and found to have real results - that can show us the way to social progress. There are few academics who write with as much grace and wisdom as Timothy Wilson.

Redirect is a masterpiece. Timothy D. Wilson is the Sherrell J. Aston Professor of Psychology at the University of Virginia. He is the author of Strangers to Ourselves, which was named by New York Times Magazine as one of the Best Ideas of , and is co-author of the bestselling Social Psychology textbook, now in its seventh edition. He lives in Charlottesville, Virginia, with his wife and two children.

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