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RACE CAR AERODYNAMICS JOSEPH KATZ PDF

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Aerodynamics of Race Cars. Joseph Katz. Department of Aerospace Engineering , San Diego State University, San Diego, California ;. Race car performance depends on elements such as the engine, tires, Joseph Katz; Published ; DOI/ronaldweinland.info Race car. Race Car Aerodynamics: Designing for Speed (Engineering and Performance). Home · Race Car Performance) Author: Joseph Katz DOWNLOAD PDF.


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Aerodynamics of race cars-joseph ronaldweinland.info - Download as PDF File .pdf), Text File .txt) or read online. Race Car Aerodynamics - Joseph Katz - 1st Edition - Ebook download as PDF File .pdf) or read book online. Race Car Aerodynamics by Joseph Katz, , available at Book Depository with free delivery worldwide.

Review By Matt Gartner Race Car Aerodynamics provides a comprehensive guide to how air flows around and through race cars. It is the most useful book on aerodynamics of several I have in my collection and covers nearly everything an amateur designer could want to know about aerodynamics. The book is well organized, moving logically from beginning theory to detailed explanations of aerodynamic devices, their design and their behaviors. It is very focused on theory and design—you won't find any fabrication instructions on building the actual aerodynamic devices, and that is alright There are many books that can show you how to fabricate with composites or sheet metal to produce aerodynamic shapes. It is written with a non-engineer in mind and avoids going too technical, yet it encompasses so many areas of aerodynamics that the reader will come away with a "big picture" engineering perspective on fluid flows to use in their own designs.

This study has shown necessity of endplates to reduce drag due turbulence created at the end of the wing. Joseph Katz [12], has discussed typical design tools such as wind tunnel testing, computational fluid dynamics, and track testing, and their relevance to race car development.

This review briefly explains the significance of the aerodynamic down-force and how it improves race car performance. Review Computational Fluid Dynamics CFD is a computer-based technology that studies the dynamics of all things that flow. In Formula One racing, CFD involves building a computer-simulated model of a race car and then applying the laws of physics to the virtual prototype to predict what the down-force or drag may be on various components of the car or how the car will respond in various wind conditions, changing environmental conditions or on different road surfaces.

Steps in Solving CFD Problem On the basis of important features of the problem to be solved, the basic procedural steps are given below. So the flow would definitely be a turbulent one at the front wing surfaces. It has dimensions of L2 T-2 , e. It becomes negative i.

Race Car Aerodynamics - Joseph Katz - 1st Edition

Modeling First of all, a model without endplates has developed to check endplates as flow deflectors. Then three models have been developed from the Basic Model with optimum angle of attack by attaching additional down-force productive plates to the endplate. Figure 1 CAD Model without endplates 3. Basic Models This primary design sets a Basic Model of the front wing. Point of the front wing on the leading edge is 950mm, from the wheel centre as per the regulations. Base plane is taken at a height of 100mm from road.

AERODYNAMICS OF RACE CARS

B1, B2, B3, etc with change in angle of attack have been developed. To deflect the flow from wheels so as to reduce drag, a vertical wing endplate is introduced. Thickness of endplate is 32mm.

It is assumed that the flow should remain attached on the upper surface of the wing. Another model has been created with a plate attached to the endplate. Mesh Requirements The car front-body is symmetric about a central vertical plane, thus only half portion is used for analysis.

Automotive Aerodynamics - E-bok - Katz Joseph Katz (9781119185741) | Bokus

Remaining portion has been used for flow analysis. Figure 5 Boundary conditions of meshed model 5. To deflect the flow from wheels so as to reduce drag, a vertical wing endplate is introduced. Thickness of endplate is 32mm.

It is assumed that the flow should remain attached on the upper surface of the wing. Another model has been created with a plate attached to the endplate. Mesh Requirements The car front-body is symmetric about a central vertical plane, thus only half portion is used for analysis.

Remaining portion has been used for flow analysis. Figure 5 Boundary conditions of meshed model 5. Convergence of solution for all models is obtained after about iterations.

Performance The reference surface areas that are subjected to lift and drag forces give the CL and CD values. Observed Flow Pattern 5. Multi-element airfoil Due to the slope of the two-element airfoil along the span, the flow has greatly been improved. First the fact of setting a gap between the lower surface of the first element and the bottom of the vertical airfoil prevents the air from rounding the endplates as it was expected during the design process. This avoids the depression to be affected by the air rounding the tip from the high pressure, on the upper surface, to the low pressure, on the lower surface see Figure 7.

Figure 7 Pressure distribution at 5 cm from the centre line 5. Flow Over Wheels The rotation of the wheel is simulated see Figure 8.

Wheel creates vortices near ground surface. Thus a low pressure area is developed behind wheel. It creates resisting drag for wheel. The turbulence generated is also responsible for increased drag forces on car.

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Figure 8 Evidence of the rotating flow around the wheel a Without endplate b Basic Model with endplate Figure 9 Pressure distribution on wheel surface Figure 9 provides the evidence of the performance of the endplates in term of deflection of the flow. Indeed the distribution of pressure on the outward side [Figure 9 b ] of the wheel shows lower pressure. That means that most of the flow has been diverted outward by the endplates.

The lift coefficient for model without endplate is Somewhat similar to the well-known dry friction model, a force is created by the tire, which is proportional to the normal force and initially varies linearly with the slip angle.

So the rst obser- vation here is that to generate side force as in cornering the tire must be subject to a certain level of side slip. When this slip angle is too large [e. Some commercial tires generate less side force under such side-sliding conditions, but race car tire manufacturers desire to maintain most of the side force under moderate sliding conditions.

So beyond the linear slip range a commercial tire may have a negative slope whereas the racing tire should maintain a at shape, as shown.

In addition, the two curves in the left-hand side diagram depict the effect of increasing the normal load, and, as mentioned, with higher normal force larger lateral forces can be created hence the analogy to dry friction. Of course a sim- ilar diagram may be drawn for the tire longitudinal force e. In this longitudinal case the slip is the ratio between actual road and tire rotation speed.

Katz aerodynamics joseph pdf car race

The im- mediate conclusion is that if aerodynamics can be used to increase the normal force acting on the tire, a similar improvement in traction can be expected.

In most forms of racing it is desirable to create the fastest vehicle in a particular category. Traditionally, the effects of external aerodynamics are summarized in terms of drag, lift, and stability. Usually the side force due to aerodynamic side slip was not examined carefully because race cars go much faster than the prevailing winds, and, instead of lift, the generation of efcient downforce became the main issue. The three aerodynamic moments came to light when designers realized that vehicle stability and handling can be improved by properly balancing the downforce e.

Such desirable aerodynamic downforce can be generated by adding lifting surfaces onto, or by modifying, the vehicles body. When a vehicle moves fast, lateral instability may become uncomfortable from the drivers point of view. This was observed early with speed record cars that used huge stabilizers similar to airplane vertical surfaces in the back with pure aerodynamic stabilization in mind. An example of this school of thought can be found in vehicles such as the 1970 Blue Flame rocket-propelled car that passed 1001.

The common design aspect of these two cars is the effort to improve lateral stability by pure aerodynamic means e.

As noted earlier, only toward the end of the 1960s did race car designers realize the huge advantage of using aerodynamics to augment tire traction and subsequently cornering and stability. To explain this statement we must return to Figure 1.