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MILL ON THE FLOSS NOVEL PDF

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PDF version of The Mill on the Floss by George Eliot. Download the FREE e- Book version of English novelist George Eliot's story of affectionate, willful Maggie. Free kindle book and epub digitized and proofread by Project Gutenberg. The Mill on the Floss by George Eliot Download This eBook. The Mill on the Floss. Pages The cook's illustrated meat book: the game- changing guide that teaches you how to cook meat Cook's Illustrated Meat.


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be found in the early years of the heroine of “The Mill on the Floss. the stage and had lectured on philosophy; had produced a play, two novels, and articles. The Mill on the Floss is novel written by Mary Ann Evans under her pen name George Eliot, a Victorian English writer remembered for her novels Middlemarch, Daniel Deronda, and Adam Bede. Mr. Tulliver, a mill owner lives in a fictional town Dorlcote Mill located in the Floss river. Download The Mill On The Floss free in PDF & EPUB format. Download George Eliot's The Mill The Mill On The Floss. George Eliot · Novel | English | 17/10/14 .

Eliot is a distinct landmark in the history of the modern novel. Fiction in her hand is no longer a mere entertainment. It strikes rather a new note of seriousness. Eliot's works one is aware of her desire to enlarge the possibilities of the novel as a form of expression. She wishes to include new themes, to penetrate more deeply into the characters. According to David Daiches "She was the first English novelist to move in the vanguard of the thought and learning of her day and in doing so, added new scope and dignity to the English novel.

Out of which, there was no happy issue. Maggie Tulliver, the heroine of the novel, is born with an immense capacity for bestowing love on others and desiring it from others. As she grows up, she has not lost the need to love and be loved. The affection developing from the tender pity for deformed Philip in her young days matures into love.

It is also debatable whether what Maggie feels for Philip is love merely a sympathetic liking. When Philip meets magic in the Red Deeps, Maggie is passing through a sort of spiritual crisis.

She finds nothing but suffering and misery all around her. In Philip she finds a companion who can cater to the deepest cravings of her spirit. But Maggie knows that her brother and father will not allow her to marry Philip. All through her life, Maggie is torn between duty and desire, personal happiness and family ties, and her liking for Philip is one victim of this conflict. Most of us, however, would be a little more disturbed about the late development in the story.

The popular view of love is that it takes place only once in a life time. Therefore, the common reader would find fault with Maggie for being attracted to Stephen at all. Once she has pledged herself to Philip, she would be expected not even to think of any body else. Her meeting with Stephen Guest leads to a worse conflict. Stephen appeals to the sensuous and youthful nature of Maggie.

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Maggie is a young and healthy girl. Her nature demands all the depth of feelings which Stephen alone brings into her life. It has been said that love is a spontaneous feeling. It cannot be artificially created. Therefore, we cannot blame Maggie if she finds herself so powerfully attracted to Stephen. Maggie has to suffer tragedy because she has to contend against two forces; inner conflict as well as outer conflict. The two conflicts are intermingled and integrated, influenced and determined by one another.

The external conflict is embodied first Philip on the one side, and Tom and Mr. Tulliver on the other. Then it is embodied by Stephen on the one side and Philip, Tom and Lucy on the other. Her brother Tom with his rigid unimaginative moral code simply cannot understand Maggie. She has to struggle against the narrow minded notions and customs of her family. Up to the last minute, Maggie has to face adverse comments of society.

When she returns without marrying Stephen, she acts according to her own high principles but she has to face the anger of Tom and the malicious gossip of the town.

She has to face internal conflict also. She cannot totally supersede ways of society or Tom's demands precisely because her own nature is torn between opposing forces as her sensitivity and thoughtful nature lead to mental conflict whenever she is in a situation which offers two solutions. Maggie is not satisfied with the little that the world offers.

She herself says to Philip. In the case of Philip, it is her desire for submission and her desire for independence that comes into clash. She finds comfort in his company. However, there is a consciousness of doing something which would hurt her father. Thus, a conflict arises between her desire and her loyalty to family demands.

Her sense of duty always has a slight edge over her personal desires though the result makes her unhappy. This conflict, however, is not very strong because Maggie's passions are not involved. In the case of her involvement with Stephen, however, something deeper is involved.

Stephen arouses in her the feelings of sexual love and sexual pleasure. Her sensuous nature now comes into clash with her moral nature and the result is deep agony for her.

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She refuses to marry Stephen. She would cause great misery to Philip and Lucy if she married Stephen. She is not the girl to accept this at the cost of the happiness of others. The conflict between her duty and personal desire is acute and painful. Stephen's letter, in spite of everything, is the test. The battle in her mind is stupendous. It is indeed the greatest moment of temptation.

Maggie's final decision to sacrifice her own happiness with Stephen is true renunciation. She had earlier decided to take the path of renunciation under the influence of the book by Thomas Kempis. This self-sacrifice that has helped Maggie to give up Philip first and Stephen next is finally directed to the rescue of her brother in the moment of dire calamity, the sweeping flood of Floss.

Both Tom and Maggie die. So we can conclude from all this discussion that the moral dilemma of Maggie is her conflict between duty and desire and she has to struggle against both of them.

Her struggle continues to the very last day of her life. Baker remarks: "The drama is internal; it is the drama of moral conflict. The conflict is that of ego-centric impulses, good or bad, with an opposing environment. Much has been said against the Stephen-Maggie episode in the novel. Very few critics have tried to defend this episode. Critics like Saintsbury, Leslie Stephen and F. Leavis say that Stephen Guest is a failure in characterization. Swinburne is of the opinion that a noble girl like Maggie cannot fall in love with Stephen Guest, a shallow dandy.

George Eliot, however, defended her against the criticism, making clear in a letter written to Blackwood that the episodes handling was deliberate.

She says if the ethics of art does not admit the truthful presentation of a character; it is too narrow and needs to be broadened with the corresponding widening psychology. However, the question which a modern reader is faced with is not whether so noble a character as Maggie could be mastered by her passions, but whether Stephen Guest is presented as a temptation to her.

The very first picture of Stephen is of disagreeable impression. Nevertheless, there are reasons to suppose that G. Eliot intends to give an impression to be disagreeable. He is a conceited foolish and egotist as compared with Philip Wakems. He is a man without perception and without chivalry, when placed against Bob Jakin. By doing so, George Eliot meant to show certain developments in his character under the influence of his love for Maggie.

At the first appearance, Stephen is shown imagining himself in love with Lucy and he likes to smile down from his tall height, with the air of a rather patronizing lover at the little lady on the music stool. Eliot's method of presenting Stephen is through dialogues which enable her of giving an explicit account of Stephen's motives behind his choice of Lucy for certain characteristics which were superficial.

But the very next chapter makes him to meet with Maggie who represents the characteristics quite opposite to those being represented by Lucy. Her qualities which cause him to be taken aback are quite opposite. Maggie is markedly intelligent instead of merely not stupid; she is tall and dark looking instead of small, fair and pretty.

Eliot intentionally makes Stephen under the passionate love choose a lady whom he would never have thought of selecting in general circumstances and this selection is quite contrary to his deliberate choice of Lucy.

This experience is designed to shatter his complacency, humble his masculine vanity in order to impart a new depth to his character which may be capable of undergoing a tragic suffering. At the same moment it is essential to apprehend that Maggie's own love for Philip Wakems is overwhelmed by a strange kind of feeling, unlike any she has hitherto experienced.

Her love for Philip Wakems has been moved partly through the pity she felt for his crippleness and partly because of her admiration for his keen and well-furnished intellect. When we reach the boat scene in this chapter, we come to know that Maggie is mastered by her, first on rush of passionate love for Stephen which springs to meet his love for her. George Eliot allows the bond between them to become more tightened to the degree of an unbreakable tie. Both of them are conscious of the danger awaiting them.

When she gives her consent to go alone with Stephen on the boating expedition, incidentally, both Lucy and Philip withdraw themselves for certain self assumptions of their own creation, and Stephen arrives alone.

Maggie resists the temptation but as it does not seem a fatal one she yields. Stephen is conscious of his will, so he allows the circumstances to move towards the fulfillment of his desires though he himself is not contriving them.

The Mill on the Floss

Maggie remains unaware. But she allows her natural impulse to take charge. The gliding of boat through water symbolizes the way, Maggie letting the things slide. At last Stephan ceased to row, and laid down the oars. This sudden change roused Maggie. But as it seems it is too late to choose her way. To get back to St. Ogg's that night is impossible and whatever decision Maggie makes the following morning, she is unable to avert the suffering that her yielding has caused. When Stephen wakes and the conflict of wills take place between the "two", the issues remain in dark.

Maggie decision is "an outcome of feelings and not of thought," as Bennet remarks. Stephen addresses her with his own self- assumption that she will reconcile with the situation: "Dearest you are now mine; the world believes it.

In a few hours you will be mine" But Maggie refuses to act in accordance with the proposal and decides to reveal the reality to both Philip and Lucy' whose love and trust has been betrayed respectively. When Stephen informs her of the dire circumstances, which may follow her decision, she remains strict to her decision: "Yes l do l will confess everything.

While applying the moral standards to the above situation, we feel that Stephen and Maggie should have shown more honesty and courage. When they discover that they are in love, their intention to marry Lucy and Philip in the face of this discovery seems ignoble.

When Maggie returns to ST. Ogg's and seeks Dr. Keen's advice. Eliot puts her own words in his mouth. Joan Bennet thinks "George Eliot is hampered by current moral assumptions and also by the traditional norms. Maggie is a young and healthy girl.

Her nature demands all the depth of feelings which Stephen alone brings into her life. It has been said that love is a spontaneous feeling. It cannot be artificially created. Therefore, we cannot blame Maggie if she finds herself so powerfully attracted to Stephen. Maggie has to suffer tragedy because she has to contend against two forces; inner conflict as well as outer conflict. The two conflicts are intermingled and integrated, influenced and determined by one another.

The external conflict is embodied first Philip on the one side, and Tom and Mr. Tulliver on the other. Then it is embodied by Stephen on the one side and Philip, Tom and Lucy on the other. Her brother Tom with his rigid unimaginative moral code simply cannot understand Maggie. She has to struggle against the narrow minded notions and customs of her family. Up to the last minute, Maggie has to face adverse comments of society.

When she returns without marrying Stephen, she acts according to her own high principles but she has to face the anger of Tom and the malicious gossip of the town. She has to face internal conflict also. She cannot totally supersede ways of society or Tom's demands precisely because her own nature is torn between opposing forces as her sensitivity and thoughtful nature lead to mental conflict whenever she is in a situation which offers two solutions.

Maggie is not satisfied with the little that the world offers. She herself says to Philip. In the case of Philip, it is her desire for submission and her desire for independence that comes into clash.

She finds comfort in his company. However, there is a consciousness of doing something which would hurt her father. Thus, a conflict arises between her desire and her loyalty to family demands. Her sense of duty always has a slight edge over her personal desires though the result makes her unhappy.

This conflict, however, is not very strong because Maggie's passions are not involved. In the case of her involvement with Stephen, however, something deeper is involved. Stephen arouses in her the feelings of sexual love and sexual pleasure. Her sensuous nature now comes into clash with her moral nature and the result is deep agony for her. She refuses to marry Stephen.

She would cause great misery to Philip and Lucy if she married Stephen.

The Mill on the Floss - Free download PDF ebook

She is not the girl to accept this at the cost of the happiness of others. The conflict between her duty and personal desire is acute and painful. Stephen's letter, in spite of everything, is the test. The battle in her mind is stupendous. It is indeed the greatest moment of temptation. Maggie's final decision to sacrifice her own happiness with Stephen is true renunciation. She had earlier decided to take the path of renunciation under the influence of the book by Thomas Kempis.

On the pdf mill floss novel

This self-sacrifice that has helped Maggie to give up Philip first and Stephen next is finally directed to the rescue of her brother in the moment of dire calamity, the sweeping flood of Floss. Both Tom and Maggie die. So we can conclude from all this discussion that the moral dilemma of Maggie is her conflict between duty and desire and she has to struggle against both of them. Her struggle continues to the very last day of her life.

Baker remarks: "The drama is internal; it is the drama of moral conflict. The conflict is that of ego-centric impulses, good or bad, with an opposing environment.

Much has been said against the Stephen-Maggie episode in the novel. Very few critics have tried to defend this episode. Critics like Saintsbury, Leslie Stephen and F. Leavis say that Stephen Guest is a failure in characterization. Swinburne is of the opinion that a noble girl like Maggie cannot fall in love with Stephen Guest, a shallow dandy.

George Eliot, however, defended her against the criticism, making clear in a letter written to Blackwood that the episodes handling was deliberate. She says if the ethics of art does not admit the truthful presentation of a character; it is too narrow and needs to be broadened with the corresponding widening psychology. However, the question which a modern reader is faced with is not whether so noble a character as Maggie could be mastered by her passions, but whether Stephen Guest is presented as a temptation to her.

The very first picture of Stephen is of disagreeable impression. Nevertheless, there are reasons to suppose that G. Eliot intends to give an impression to be disagreeable. He is a conceited foolish and egotist as compared with Philip Wakems.

He is a man without perception and without chivalry, when placed against Bob Jakin. By doing so, George Eliot meant to show certain developments in his character under the influence of his love for Maggie. At the first appearance, Stephen is shown imagining himself in love with Lucy and he likes to smile down from his tall height, with the air of a rather patronizing lover at the little lady on the music stool.

Eliot's method of presenting Stephen is through dialogues which enable her of giving an explicit account of Stephen's motives behind his choice of Lucy for certain characteristics which were superficial. But the very next chapter makes him to meet with Maggie who represents the characteristics quite opposite to those being represented by Lucy.

Her qualities which cause him to be taken aback are quite opposite. Maggie is markedly intelligent instead of merely not stupid; she is tall and dark looking instead of small, fair and pretty. Eliot intentionally makes Stephen under the passionate love choose a lady whom he would never have thought of selecting in general circumstances and this selection is quite contrary to his deliberate choice of Lucy.

This experience is designed to shatter his complacency, humble his masculine vanity in order to impart a new depth to his character which may be capable of undergoing a tragic suffering. At the same moment it is essential to apprehend that Maggie's own love for Philip Wakems is overwhelmed by a strange kind of feeling, unlike any she has hitherto experienced.

Her love for Philip Wakems has been moved partly through the pity she felt for his crippleness and partly because of her admiration for his keen and well-furnished intellect. When we reach the boat scene in this chapter, we come to know that Maggie is mastered by her, first on rush of passionate love for Stephen which springs to meet his love for her.

George Eliot allows the bond between them to become more tightened to the degree of an unbreakable tie. Both of them are conscious of the danger awaiting them.

The Mill on the Floss by George Eliot

When she gives her consent to go alone with Stephen on the boating expedition, incidentally, both Lucy and Philip withdraw themselves for certain self assumptions of their own creation, and Stephen arrives alone. Maggie resists the temptation but as it does not seem a fatal one she yields.

Stephen is conscious of his will, so he allows the circumstances to move towards the fulfillment of his desires though he himself is not contriving them. Maggie remains unaware. But she allows her natural impulse to take charge. The gliding of boat through water symbolizes the way, Maggie letting the things slide.

At last Stephan ceased to row, and laid down the oars. This sudden change roused Maggie. But as it seems it is too late to choose her way.

To get back to St. Ogg's that night is impossible and whatever decision Maggie makes the following morning, she is unable to avert the suffering that her yielding has caused. When Stephen wakes and the conflict of wills take place between the "two", the issues remain in dark.

Maggie decision is "an outcome of feelings and not of thought," as Bennet remarks. Stephen addresses her with his own self- assumption that she will reconcile with the situation: "Dearest you are now mine; the world believes it. In a few hours you will be mine" But Maggie refuses to act in accordance with the proposal and decides to reveal the reality to both Philip and Lucy' whose love and trust has been betrayed respectively.

When Stephen informs her of the dire circumstances, which may follow her decision, she remains strict to her decision: "Yes l do l will confess everything. While applying the moral standards to the above situation, we feel that Stephen and Maggie should have shown more honesty and courage. When they discover that they are in love, their intention to marry Lucy and Philip in the face of this discovery seems ignoble.

When Maggie returns to ST. Ogg's and seeks Dr. Keen's advice. Eliot puts her own words in his mouth. Joan Bennet thinks "George Eliot is hampered by current moral assumptions and also by the traditional norms.

After burning Stephen's letter, she is left with nothing to wish for except to join the majority and the author provide her with wish-fulfilling death through drowning.

We can sum up the above discussion by saying that all the objections concerning Stephen's character and his relationship with Maggie in the book VI of the novel, are baseless. Leslie Stephen's argument that he is a "thing" instead of a "man" and a "coxcomb" seems unjustifiable because the change in his character makes him courageous to take the blame of the elopement upon him, and Maggie's love makes him more honest about his love and imparts a moral and intellectual up righteousness to his character.

The most important aspect that George Eliot has added to the novel is symbolism. These symbols add allegorical and specific meaning to the novel.

Through these symbols, she enhances the beauty of the novel and emphasizes its tragic effect. In the novel, "The Mill on the Floss" the river appears as a symbol the novel has become more complete and effective. We are never allowed to forget the river and its influence. The "Mill" is a symbol of the economic life, sustenance and prosperity. As the story moves with its course, one realizes that the mill assumes a central position in the affairs of the town. It also has artistic implications as regards the structure of the novel.

The main point of critical contention with regard to "The Mill on the Floss" is the ending in which Maggie drowns in a futile attempt to save her brother Tom, from the flood water of the Floss. Many critics are inclined to regard this event as George Eliot's way of extricating her heroine from a situation that had become too complicated for solution in this novel. Cornelius Weygand thinks the tragic ending seems imposed.

Actually, the drowning scene is so heavily foreshadowed throughout the novel that it seems almost artistically impossible for the book to end in any other way. From the very first the reader finds Mrs.