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MERCHANT OF VENICE STORY BOOK

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A short summary of William Shakespeare's The Merchant of Venice. This free synopsis covers all the crucial plot points of The Merchant of Venice. Here is a brief plot summary of The Merchant of Venice: A young Venetian, Bassanio, needs a loan of three thousand ducats so that he can woo Portia. Free kindle book and epub digitized and proofread by Project Gutenberg.


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This is one of Shakespeare's darkest comedies, for the romantic story of a young man, Bassanio, who has squandered his fortune and must borrow money. Read online or download for free graded reader ebook and audiobook The Merchant of Venice by William Shakespeare of elementary level you can download. The Merchant of Venice is a 16th-century play written by William Shakespeare in which a . in translation in The story of the three caskets can be found in Gesta Romanorum, a collection of tales probably compiled at the end of the 13th century.

Antonio is short of money because all his wealth is invested in his fleet, which is currently at sea. Antonio agrees, confident that his ships will return in time. The Princes of Morocco and Arragon fail the test and are rejected. Bassanio chooses the lead casket, which contains her picture, and Portia happily agrees to marry him immediately. Portia follows him, accompanied by her maid, Nerissa.

Antonio enters and says that Bassanio is leaving for Belmont and that Gratiano should come to bid him goodbye.

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But when he opens the chest, a skull with a scroll are all that sit inside. The scroll turns out to be a chastising poem, and the Prince leaves quickly.

Portia is only glad to see him go. He reports that Shylock shouted to the heavens for justice. He departs, and a messenger arrives to tell Portia that a young Venetian has come to Belmont to try and win her hand.

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Portia hopes that it is Bassanio and she and Nerissa go to greet the suitor. The two men claim the accusation proudly, and Salarino tells Shylock that there is more of a difference between him and his daughter than between jet and ivory.

Salarino asks Shylock if he can confirm the rumors about the sunken vessels and Shylock answers that Antonio will soon have to give up his bond of flesh. Salarino wonders what Shylock intends to do with a pound of flesh and Shylock replies that it will feed his revenge.

Shylock tells the men that Antonio has treated him badly because he is a Jew and he intends to have his revenge by applying what he has been taught of Christian intolerance. Portia entreats him to leave off picking one of the chests for a few days so that they can spend some time together first, as he is likely to leave if he guesses wrong.

But Bassanio wants to choose quickly so that he will not have to live another moment without Portia as his wife. He rejects the silver chest next and finally picks the lead chest. Portia is delighted, and the couple promises to love one another. Portia gives Bassanio a ring to wear always, saying that if he gets rid of it, this will signal that their love is gone forever. Nerissa and Gratiano admit that they have fallen in love as well and a double wedding is suggested.

Lorenzo and Jessica enter along with Salarino. Salarino gives Bassanio a letter from Antonio informing him that his ships are gone and that Shylock will want to collect his pound of flesh. Portia offers to pay the debt herself, but Jessica tells her that Shylock is only interested in revenge.

In the letter, Antonio asks to see Bassanio again before he dies and Portia urges Bassanio to go to him. Shylock tells the jailer not to speak to Antonio. Antonio assumes that Shylock hates him for bailing out so many of his unfortunate debtors. Solanio assures Antonio that the Duke would never allow so ridiculous a contract to be upheld. Antonio only prays that Bassanio will arrive in time to see him before he dies.

Portia says that she has never regretted doing a good deed and that she could never deny helping someone that Bassanio loves. She leaves Lorenzo and Jessica to watch over her estate while she is gone.

The Merchant of Venice by William Shakespeare

After they leave, however, Portia informs Nerissa that they are going to follow Bassanio to Venice incognito. She promises to give Nerissa the full details on the trip. Act III, Scene V Launcelot tells Jessica that he is worried for her soul as the sins of the father are to be visited upon his children.

Jessica insists that she is saved by converting for her marriage.

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Launcelot worries that the conversion of Jews, who do not eat pork, will have a bad effect on the price of bacon. Lorenzo enters and chastises Lorenzo for impregnating a black servant girl.

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Launcelot gives a witty response, and Lorenzo sighs over the sarcasm. Launcelot leaves to prepare for dinner. Lorenzo asks Jessica what she thinks of Portia and Jessica admits that she is impressed by her and considers her nearly perfect.

Lorenzo jokes about being as good of a spouse as Portia while leading her to dinner. When the Duke greets Antonio, he expresses his pity and calls Shylock a monster. Shylock is brought into the courtroom, and the Duke posits that Shylock is only trying to frighten Antonio and that no one would demand this penalty after a man has already been bankrupted as well.

Bassanio tries to argue with Shylock, but Antonio stops him, saying that there is no point. Antonio says that hatred comes naturally to Shylock. Bassanio offers Shylock twice as much as the original loan, but Shylock turns him down.

The Duke says that he has sent for council from a lawyer and a messenger has arrived with the information. Salarino goes to fetch the messenger. Shylock, expecting a favorable judgment, begins whetting his knife. The letter mentions a young lawyer named Balthasar and orders Nerissa to admit the man into the court. The letter says that the man was sent in the stead of the other lawyer as he is ill.

Disguised as Balthasar, Portia enters.

The Merchant of Venice

She tells the Duke that she has reviewed the case and Shylock and Antonio are brought before her. Portia asks Antonio if he admits that he owes Shylock money. He says that he does. Portia calls upon Shylock to be merciful, but he asks why he should be. She tells Antonio to prepare his breast for the knife. In preparation for his death, Antonio bids his friends goodbye. In a sarcastic aside, Portia and Nerissa mutter that their wives are not likely to appreciate that sentiment.

Just as Shylock is about to cut into Antonio, Portia reminds him that he must take the flesh without producing any blood, as the bond does not allow him any. She informs Shylock that if a drop of blood is spilled than he will be arrested and his lands and goods will be seized.

Suddenly overturned, Shylock is unsure what to do. Defeated, Shylock drops the case. Portia reminds him what the penalty for threatening the life of a Venetian is.

Half of his money would go to the state and the other half to the man that he threatened. Portia tells Shylock to beg the Duke for mercy.

My first encounter with a Shakespeare play wasn't until I was in late key stage three, maybe even key stage four, and by then I had to study the full text in it's traditional language which did not relate, therefore understanding the stories was quite a difficult task.

If I had had these 'child-friendly' versions available to me from an earlier age then I would have already grasped the stories and understood them, enjoyed them and looked forward to studying them in greater detail. To have on a classroom bookshelf would give great opportunities for children to read these stories independently, probably without even realising they were reading a Shakespeare story.

They are short and manageable for independent readers and the illustrations help bring the story to life.

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In upper key stage two, Shakespeare might be briefly looked at in Literacy; these books would become greatly valuable in shared or guided reading sessions. Andrew Matthews has retold sixteen of Shakespeare's most famous works, bringing Shakespeare to the children of Today. The love aspect of this story was great, it showed how the poor man fell in love with the rich woman and it wasn't because of how much money she had it was because he had a deep, real love for her.

This is a tale of friendship, love, racism, revenge, justice and it was a great an interesting read. It was great but i suggest that u should have a glossary for certian difficult words which are less than few…..

It was so easy to have a quick summary before going in to my exam hall. Hail to nosweatshakespeare. It is you hereafter in every last minute exams. Helped me revise a lot. A very quick and easy summary to read and learn the book from. It is nosweatShakespeare after all. Thanks a lot guys!!! Your email address will not be published. Save my name, email, and website in this browser for the next time I comment.

The Merchant of Venice by William Shakespeare - Free Ebook

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