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AL HIDAYAH BOOK

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Al-Hidayah fi Sharh Bidayat al-Mubtadi (d. AH/ CE) commonly referred to as numerous commentaries. The book played a key role in the development of the amalgam of Islamic and British law known as Anglo-Muhammadan law. Al-Hidayah: The Guidance (v. 1) Hardcover – April 1, 'Abd al Jalal al-Farghani, al-Marghinani was the Muslim world's leading 13th-century jurist. Imran Ahsan Khan Nyazee is a professor and the chief editor of Shariah and Islamic law at the International Islamic University. Al-Hidayah: The Guidance (Volume 1) [Burhan al-Din al-Farghani are not taken into account, never has a book received so much attention as the Hidayah.

It represents the refined, distilled and authentic version of a legal tradition developed over many centuries. It is the corpus of Hanafi law in its approved and preferred form and forges an organic link with the other schools of law. There is no book that can match the power of al-Hidayah as a teaching manual. Education in Islamic law is not complete without this book. Accordingly, each and every madrassah, whatever its affiliation, imparts instruction in Islamic law through al-Hidayah.

He wanted the book to stay small and precise, the way he wrote it. He wrote a lengthy book himself, but said this: It is very difficult to access huge commentaries spread over a dozen or so volumes. They are avoided even by the teachers themselves. The translation itself, we feel, has eliminated the need for many of the notes given in various editions of the book. In translating this book, our hope is that it will be used by the younger generation to understand Islamic law and the legal reasoning underlying the law.

For this purpose, the best course of action for the student is to add his own notes after discussion with the teacher. The exercise will be extremely beneficial. Accordingly, in the first few books our notes are somewhat lengthy. This is intentional. The aim was to keep in view the interest of the general reader, who does not have access to a teacher and to show by example what kind of notes may be added by the student himself.

On some pages, we felt, that there was no need for adding notes; in fact, notes on some pages would become a hindrance rather than a help. We hope that the notes, where provided, will be of use to all. We find that many schools and madeuis teach the law from al-Qudari. It is a wonderful book and needs to be read, however, Bidayat al-Mubtadi' includes al-Quduri within it and much more.

It is a better organised, more refined and somewhat expanded version of al-Quduri. An effort along will be made to provide the Arabic version of Bidayat al-Mubtadi' with the English meanings extracted from this translation.

An ideal approach would be, at least for the classroom, to read the smaller text and then turn to al-Hiclayah for elaboration.

The result is that very little attention is paid to of al - Hidayah into a the frill inside and a major goal of the book is lost.

In the text, the Author of al-Hidayoli usually refers to: It has been noticed in the text, however, that the statement "this feeble servant" usually appears when he is correcting an error in al-Quduri's text.

The list provided above is an excerpt from Allamah al-Lakhnawi's text. We list below a few points that we consider important.

If the rule appears as a single opinion, it is the unanimous view of the school, that is, the view of the Imam and the two disciples. As far as the rnatn opinion first.

In such a case, the position is reversed in the commentary; he will provide arguments and support for the stronger opinion at the end of the discussion. Where two jurists are on one side, the rule according to the tw will be stated first. This is usually Abu llanifah God blesshim o alo with one of his companions.

In such a case, the view of the ng her disciple, where it is a reasonably strong opinion appears withinotthe matt:. At other times, a variant narration from a disciple or eve n f the Imam himself are mentioned in the commentary merely forromthe purpose of elaboration. Conflicting quoted not for adoption of alternate rules, but to teach opinions are Ali.

This is followed by Zufar God bless him and then Malik God bless him. In discussing the disagreements, the texts relied upon by the disagreeing Imam are stated, followed by rational arguments on his behalf. The response of the school is then provided through the texts adopted as well as through. Perhaps, the most difficult sections of the book are where the Author mentions parallel and distinguished cases.

The situation becomes extremely complex when in a single sentence two or three cases are distinguished from each other. This is where the Mil is, however. Most of the time, the filth of a totally different category of law has to be recalled along with the governing rules to understand the comparisons and distinctions. That is, the rule depends upon the matn.

Al-Hidayah | Independent Publishers Group

When he reproduces al-Qudari's text, he is. When an error is found, and this is rare, he supports the correction through the statements of the earlier jurists. This affects al-Quduri's text. In addition to this, the sequence of his statements is also altered sometimes.

This usually happens when al-Marghinani brings in additional material from other sources, whole sections a few times. At other times he may move the statements to another location for the sake of better organisation.

On issues that are directly or indirectly related to the issue in the matn. This is what the fatawa compilations do as a major function. Sometimes groups of cases have been arranged in a particular sequence to highlight the links between them and to indicate the total application of a rule. We have given brief references for the traditions found in al-Hidayah to al-Zayla'i's outstanding work, which should be consulted for the details.

A little less than three of the four volumes of this work pertain to the first volume of al-Hidayah. The work needs to be translated into English or at least published in a summarised form in English. One thing we may add here, and that concerns the method of the Hanafis for the adoption of traditions. It is a method that was developed and refined one hundred and fifty years before Imam al-Bukhari d. Sufficient attention has not been paid to this method from the perspective of a legal system, and it has been dealt with in fragmented form.

After giving the transliteration of an Arabic term and stating its meaning in English once or twice, we have retained the transliteration alone in those who the following text. This has been done intentionally so that. Tito butlloti Codification with reference to Islamic schools means the attempt! One of the earliest, and also one of the all en tirrillyl Fatawa Qadrkhan.

The Author was a contemporary of albest: M arghinanii: As al. Marghinni died at the age of eighty-two, and one of his contemporaries was Qadrkh5n's teacher, it is possible that the latter was influenced by al- Hidayah itself.

Q5clilhiin explains the nature of his book as follows: Like and al - the jurists in the third grade mentioned above: We havetrawnas miffs e t eare passage issued. He is not to oppose them with his own opinion, a6,.

This shows that the only difference between the mukhtasar, like al-Qudari on the one hand, and a fatawa compilation, on and Bida yat al-Mubladr, the other hand, is that the latter incorporates the rulings of the jurists of the third grade as well. Thus, the mukhtasar can he used fatawa compilations projust like the fatawa compilation, however the vide additional rulings, though of a lesser status.

The ijtihad. He and they are not to be opposed. His ijtihad cannot reach the level of their is not to incline towards the opinion of a jurist who has opposed them. Nor is he to adillah evidences and accept such a person's hujjah proof , because they knew the could distinguish between an evidence that was authentic and established and one that of this.

If both disciples oppose Abu Hanifah through a common opinion , and if the difference is based upon a change in conditions due to the passage of time, like rendermoral probity, he is to adopt the ruling of the ing a verdict on the basis of prima facie muzar'ah, two disciples, as the condition of the people has changed.

Thus, in the case of and similar issues, he is to adopt the view of the two disciples. In issues other than these, is to be given an option of choosing between some have maintained that the mufti them according to what his opinion guides him to.

Al-Hidayah, Volume II : The Guidance

Some said that if a person is asked They discussed the question as to who is a mujtahid. There are others who maintain identified the abrogating and abrogated texts, knows absorbed memorised al-Mabstrit, and is aware of the practices and customs of the people. If they have disagreed, mufti ishea and issue the ruling that appears sound to him. If the reatest is to undertake ijtihad he is to follow the view of the person who has the g mugallid and not a mujtahid, expertise in MI in his view, but he is to attribute the response to such a knowledge.

If the most learned person in Mt, in his view, lives in a city other than able person his, he is to have recourse to him in writing, and is not to work on conjecture for fear of fabrication: Accordingly, a fatawa compilation may be ten times the size of What then is the crucial difference between a mukhtasa,.

Afubtadi', and a. The difference has been ,Iilamgirtyyah or explained by al-Marghinani himself, and we would like to quote him. The fatawa literature, on the other hand, is directed at the vendor with the message: The incidents, however, recur repeatedly and new cases attempt to burst out of all topical systematisation.

Iet, it is the endeavour of stalwarts mujtahids to trap runaway issues by referring them to their origins and by settling them through precedents. In this endeavour reliance on the governing principles of these issues will grant a firm grip over them.

Book al hidayah

The message he is conveying is that it is not possible to record in a book all the cases that human beings face. The method is to study and understand those issues and cases that highlight the vital rules and to connect them with their origins from where they have been derived.

Once these governing rules are understood, any new case can be settled and all new situations can be faced. He lets us know, however, that this is something that can be done by stalwarts and not weaklings. The stalwarts are those who have mastered the governing rules and have acquired the ability to derive new rules.

It is not someting that can be done by people with lesser competence. The fatawa compilations, in our view, are at variance with the sound advice given by al-Marghinani. Why then did competent scholars, who compiled the fatawas, undertake this work? The only reason we can think of is deteriorating standards and the inability to acquire the requisite skills. These authors came to the conclusion that the detailed rulings must be compiled to help those who lacked the ability to do so on their own.

We are reminded of the excellent example given by Ibn Rushd. He compared a cobbler who had the skills to make shoes for any new customer with the shoe-vendor who must sell the shoes he has in stock and in the case of an absolutely new customer for whom he does not possess the right size he should get in touch with the true cobbler.

A mukhtasar like Bidy-at al-Mubtadi' is directed at the cobbler with the message: Al-Hidayah placed its stamp on most books that came after it.

AlMukhta r is in reality Bidayat al-Nfubtadi' in a different syntax. Its commentary- al-Ikhtiyar borrows huge chunks from al-HU-Mph to explain the issues. Al- Iliqayah is a summary of the entire al-Hidayah, as its full title conveys. The Fatawa 'Alarngiri openly states that it is following the structure of al-Hidayah, which means taking the basic rulings from it, besides following its general structure.

Many of the rulings that have been taken from other authoritative books could easily have been taken from al-Hidayah. The additional matter is, of course, from other authoritative books and fatawa literature.

There is, however, fiqh in al-Hidayah, but in the fatawa there are only rulings. In short, al-Hidayah became like a primary source book for the work that was done later. It was, therefore, said: This may not be entirely true, but it shows the influence al-Hidayah has had on later developments. Al-Hidayah is a very difficult book to read, and equally difficult to translate.

The advice some friends gave, prior to the commencement of the translation, was that it is impossible to translate. Perhaps they were right. A translation simplifies many things, by reducing the number of options with respect to meaning, but it will still require the complete and concentrated attention of the reader. The real complexity is not in the syntax, but in the legal concepts and reasoning. God Almighty had given al-Marghinani extraordinary skills.

He is like a tiger hunting down its prey. Reading his arguments is like running with this tiger. Suddenly you find that he has knocked down his prey and you 'See in footnote above, the advice given by Qacfi'khin to the person who does not have the requisite skills.

You have to retrace your steps and recreate every move. Each thump of the mighty paw is packed with immense power, and you are not done with one when you can see the next one coming. Like the tiger his moves are all calculated, desired to have the maximum effect. The book contains a huge amount of "coded" information.

Within this information are "macros"short statements that pack within them pages of information. This effort will grant him an ability to answer highly complex questions of fiqh without the aid of any source.

It is for this reason that al-Hidayah is used as a primary manual in almost every madrassah and institution29 in the world, whatever the school affiliation. Ayni's own commentary, al-Binayah Shark al-Hidayah, is considered to be very good. It is said that some Shafi'I jurists criticised the author for including traditions that were not very reliable.

It is our considered opinion that Al-Marghinani was relying on Imam alSarakhsi's al-Mabstit as a source book for constructing his arguments. Accordingly, when a problem cannot be fully solved through the commentaries a recourse to al-Mabsat will help. On some occasions, however, the issue discussed will not be found even in al-Mabsur. We also feel that the matn, Bidayat al-Mubtadi', may have been influenced by al-Kafi as incorporated by al-Sarakhsi.

On examining an Urdu translation published in Deoband, we found that the Urdu text did not distinguish between the statements of Bidayat al-Mubtadi' and its commentary, al-Hidayah. This led us to 3We. Accordingly, a Tarawa compilation may be ten times the size of a rnukhtasar. What then is the crucial difference between a mukhrasar like Bidavat al-Atubratii', and a jurawci compilation, such as the Farciwa The difference has been explained by al-Marghinani himself, and we would like to quote hi m here.

The incidents, however, recur repeatedly and new cases attempt to burst out of all topical systematis-ation. Yet, it is the endeavour of stalwarts muitahids to trap runaway issues by referring them to their origins and by settling them through precedents.

Why then did competent scholars, who compiled the farawas, undertake this work? A mukhtasar like aidpat al-Mubtadi' is directed at the cobbler with the message: AIMukhtar is in reality Bidayat al-Mubtadi' in a different syntax.

Its commentary al -lkhtiyar borrows huge chunks from al-Hidayah to explain the issues. AI- Wiqayah is a summary of the entire al-Hidayah, as its full title conveys. The Fatawa openly states that it is following the structure of al- Hidayah, which means taking the basic rulings from it, besides following its general structure. In short, al - Hidayah became like a primary source book for the work that was done later.

Al- Hidayah is a very difficult book to read, and equally difficult to translate. God Almighty had given al-Marghina. Suddenly you find that he has knocked down his prey and you 'See in footnote above, the advice given by QadiThan to the person who does not have the requisite skills.

Al-Qudari is said to have written a commentary on al-Karkhi's Mukhtasar. These early summaries were not very comprehensive tice: Some of the well known mukhtasars of the Hanafi school are the following:. In these mukhtasars, the chain of transmission of fiqh coming down from the earlier Imams was maintained.

Al-Marawazi created this book by summarising Kitab al-As! The book is highly organised and a strict application of the term mukhtasar will exclude this book from this category. This is the matn of which al-Hidayah is the commentary. As the title shows, it was Mahmiid ibn Sadr a summary prepared from al-Hidayah itself, not only its matn. Al-Qudriri d. In our view, preference should be given to "The Author, however, says that he has brought in additional issues that were not included by al-Quduri, and that he has tried to remove the difficulties encountered in studying al-Qudiiri.

Further, he has provided the adillah evidences and arguments in brief. We consider the merger of the matt' with the shad , without distinguishing marks of some kind, to be shocking, an act of gross negligence and callousn ess,' In our view, it is not possible to understand the book withoutseP rating the?

Further, the m atn states the rule. It is like reading the text of a statute and then turning to the commentary afor further explanations. A1-Hidayah is not only a teaching manual, it is the most authentic and reliable hook for knowing the law. It is used for this purpose all over the world, even by other schools. The other opinions mentioned in the commentary are not to be followed.

They have been provided to teach you Mt, that is, legal reasoning. Do not listen to those who teach the law in terms of qila tea gala without emphasising the opinion to be followed. It is Bidayat aI-Mubtadi' that you need. Yes, there are additional issues addressed by the Author in the commentary, but the main is the governing and primary text.

To facilitate this, we have tried to translate the text of Bidayat Mubtadi' in a manner that it can be read independently without reading the commentary. We have not succeeded all the time in doing so, because complete sentences in the matt' arc broken down at odd places by the Author for comments, and it is difficult to maintain the required links.

Nevertheless, the reader should have very little problem if he wishes to read the matt:. A1-Hidayah is difficult to understand without the help of notes or without the constant attention of the teacher. It may be argued that an expert will be able to recognize the main even if it is not distinguished.

There is no end to the number of notes that can be added to the text ofal-Hidayah, however, we have resisted this temptation out of respect for the wise judgement of the Author.

We find that many schools and madaris teach the law from al-Qudari. It is a wonderful book and needs to be read, however, Bidayat al-Mubtadi' includes al-Qudhri within it and much more. It is a better organised, more refined and somewhat expanded version of al-Qudari.

An effort will be made to provide the Arabic version of Bidayat al-Mubtadi' along with the English meanings extracted from this translation. An ideal approach would be, at least for the classroom, to read the smaller text and then turn to al-Hidayah for elaboration.

It is customary with the commentators of al-Hidayah to say something about al-Marghinani's method and the way he uses certain terms. Unfortunately, some of the glossators and hence some teachers convert the teaching of al-Hidayaii into a game of semantics. The result is that very little attention is paid to the figh inside and a major goal of the book is lost. A few of these may be irrelevant for the translationIn the text, the Author of al-Hidayah usually refers to: Hanifah ; 3.

As far as the main is concerned, he is stating the stronger opinion first. This is usually Abu Hanifah God bless him along with one of his companions. In such a case, the view of the other disciple, where it is a reasonably strong opinion, appears within the matn.

At other times, a variant narration from a disciple or even from the Imam himself are mentioned in the commentary merely for the purpose of elaboration. Conflicting opinions are 4 Statements of khilaf in the commentary. It goes without saying that the number of agreements with al-Shafi'i God bless him are the maximum. The response of the school is then provided through the texts adopted as well as through rational arguments and responses. This is where the fiqh is, however. Most of the time, the fiqh of a totally different category of law has to be recalled along with the governing rules to understand the comparisons and distinctions.

When he reproduces al-Qucari's text, he is always verifying the statements through Imam Muhammad's books. This affects al-Quclari's text. On certain occasions he deals with additional issues that are directly or indirectly related to the issue in the matn. We have given brief references for the traditions found in al- Hidayah to al-ZaylaTs outstanding work, which should be consulted for the details.

A little less than three of the four volumes of this work pertain to the first volume of al- Hidayah. One thing we may add here, and that concerns the method of the Hanalis for the adoption of traditions.

After giving the transliteration of an Arabic term and stating its meaning in English once or twice, we have retained the transliteration alone in the following text. This has been done intentionally so that those who. It would not be right if we end this introduction without sayi ng something about the contribution of Charles Hamilton, who translated al-Hidayah more than two centuries ago.

The translation was published in There are some critics of the translation; there always are of every translation. Criticism does not lessen in any way the tremendous contribution made by Hamilton in those early days. A translation is always the understanding of one person, and it has to be different from that of another person's translation of the same text.

Hamilton translated al-Hidayah with sincerity and diligence. As a result, in our view, his translation has had more influence than many writings of the last two hundred years. We would, therefore, like to say that our translation is not better than Hamilton's, but it is naturally different. Hamilton's contribution should never be taken lightly.

The Author of al-Hidayah did not divide his book into volumes. All four volumes constitute a single book. The division into volumes is the work of publishers. The text used in the madaris ends the first volume after the Book of Hafj. We have followed the Beirut edition as that is used by almost everyone today.

The first volume, therefore, ends in the middle of the Book of Talaq. I thank Mr.

Hidayah book al

Aftab Malik of the Amal Press, Bristol without whose determination and energetic management this translation would not have been possible. I must thank my wife, who diligently typed out the entire manuscript, and then read it several times making valuable suggestions.

Her contribution is gratefully acknowledged. The locations of knowledge. Some maintain that he is referring to the sources of the shari'nh, while others say that he is referring to the jurists as it is they who become the means for the transmission of knowledge.

It can also mean the definitive and probable evidences in the texts. The latter appears more likely. C An attribute of the Messengers. I lw learned Author has slated the t tlanuu' adopted. Hay be 1 the Author that tont: This needs to be larified. Such extension is through literal interpretation of the lexis as well as duough ratii,11 es tensions i lie of anti other forms or legal red Stillailg.

SC, hill. In lac t, the jurists are the leading authorities on the legal meanings ill the t tiCaur and the Smittaii. IVItat the Audio, means is the. I resolved, while writing the introduction to Bidayal that I would, with help from God, the Exalted, write its commentary, which I would call Kifiiyai al -Muninhi. I commenced work on it, with my resolve being weakened somewhat by other occupations. When I was close to completion, it appeared to he somewhat lengthy, and I feared that recourse to it would he lessened due to its length.

I, therefore, diverted. Thereafter, he itnswered all the questions and even his opponents do not say that he erred in all his answers. When that in which they agreed with him is compared with what they disputed with him, three-fourths is surrendered to him one-half for Immulating Me governing cases and onelOurth fi n' his decisions with which other jurists arc in agreement.

The remaining is shared by him with all other jurists: On hearing this the person repented on what he had said.

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In our view, irrespective of the impact of the story, the contribution of the 1. One has to read Imam Mob: I lc says that he called it Ridayat air-Muktatir.

I lis assessment proved In be true: Before him, Imam al Sarakhst had expressed such a fear on writing al- Mabsui, although he was referring more to the discussion of lengthy issues That have very little figh in them. It is a tragedy. Human beings have different approaches in seeking what they like, but knowledge in all forums blessing. Some of my brothers' asked me thereafter that 1 dictate to them the second work.

I commenced doing so, seeking support from God, the Exalted, to guide my speech and imploring Him to facilitate my task.

He makes all difficult things easy for He has power over all things. He it is who provides a suitable response God is sufficient fir us, and the best Guardian. Such large works are used only rarely by researchers for occasional citations. A work like al-Hidnyair, on the other hand, is sometimes so brief that the entire meaning is difficult to understand except by referring to the larger works. The result is that glosses and comments are then written on such concise works, which increases their size anyway.

Perhaps, concise works are more useful for instructional purposes. This extra detail was later brought back by the fiiraiva literature. God, the Exalted, has said: If you are in a state of ceremonial impurity, bathe your whole body. But if you are ill, or on a journey, or one of you has come from the privy, or you have been in contact with women, and you find no water, then take for yourselves clean earth, and rub therewith your faces and hands. The verse of purification.

This verse is the primary evidence for ablution of all types. As it is a matter of ritual obedience, the jurists try to stay as close as is possible to the literal meaning so as to give effect to the intention of the Lawgiver. It is for this reason that we find them arguing over things that may appear trivial to some. Not so according to the jurists; the intention of the Lawgiver must reign supreme and this is verified even for small details, unless such devotion to literal meanings leads to absurd results.

In other words, there is a difference between the discovery of the true intention and becoming absolutely literal.

For example, a literal reading of the words "rise up for prayer,' or prepare for prayer, would imply that minor ablution wuclie is required before each prayer, and you cannot offer more than one prayer with one ablution reading the word "when" as "whenever" in English. This, in fact, is the rule followed by the? The Hanafis read implied words into the verse to mean "when you rise up for Prayer, and you are in a state of ritual impurity The definitive obligation' for purification,3 according to this text, is the washing4 of the three limbs5 and the rubbing of the head.

The limits of the face extend from the hairline on the forehead up to the lower jaw,' and from earlobe to earlobe,' because the meaning of being "face to face" is realised in this,9 and the term wajh face is derived from it.

The elbows and the ankles are included in the washing in our view, but this is opposed by Zufar God bless him. He says that the object of the words "up to" is not included in its meaning, just like night is not included in the duration of the fast. It is to be distinguished from the wajib, translated here as obligation, which is not proved through gap. The Author uses the word taharat purifications in the titleBook of Purificationsto indicate that purification in the legal sense is of two main types: The two sometimes overlap.

The word kitab is usually translated as book. In the technical sense, however, it is a legal conception that accommodates within it a series of related rules and cases. Hence, the Book of Purification, the Book of Prayer and so on. Ghasl is the running of a liquid on the limbs whereas mash rubbing leads to moistening when it pertains to the head. Accordingly, if water is applied to the limbs, like oil is applied to them, it will not amount to ghasl.

The rukn is the pillar on which a thing stands. If a rukn, like the pillar, is missing the act is not valid. In this paragraph, the Author does not mention that washing is to be undertaken three times. First is the rule that an absolute unqualified command gives rise to an obligation, unless another evidence indicates otherwise. Such an obligation is derived for the four acts stated in the verse. Another related rule is that the absolute unqualified command does not give rise to repetition, that is, it requires the act only once, unless another evidence indicates otherwise.

It is for this reason that the Author does not mention the number of times the four parts have to be washed. He does so later on the basis of an additional evidence. The reader who wishes to "acquire filth" must be on the lookout for such rules and the way they are applied.

The Author rarely mentions them, assuming that the reader knows the rules. Accordingly, acquiring a knowledge of usul is essential for understanding fiqh. In case of fasting, the limit extends up to the limit as the term in its absolute meaning would apply to fasting for a moment. He said: The required obligation in rubbing" is part of the forehead, and this is one-fourth of the head. He passed water answering the call of nature , performed ablution, and rubbed his forehead and boots.

The issue is whether the hands are to be washed up to the elbows or whether the elbows are not to be included in the washing. The significance of the issue may be explained through the example of a person whose arm has been amputated from the joint. Is he to wash the joint? The answer is in the affirmative if the elbows are to be included in the washing. Zufar God bless him reads the words "up to the night" in the case of fasting in the same way that he reads the words "up to the elbows" in the case of minor ablution.

Read in this way, the elbows are not included in the washing, just like any part of the night is not included in the fast. The other Hanafi jurists argue that in the case of fasting it was necessary to interpret the words to set a limit for the fast.

If the word "night" had not been mentioned, the fast would have lasted only a moment, due to the absence of a limit. In the case of the word yad, which already includes the entire arm up to the armpit, the mentioning of the word elbows indicates that the elbow is included, while the part of the upper arm is excluded. The Hanafi jurists argue further that even if the verse is considered as mujmal unelaborated , it needs an elaboration bayan from the Sunnah of the Prophet God bless him and grant him peace.

The tradition they employ is: It is transmitted from Jabir God be pleased with him that "the Prophet of God God bless him and grant him peace , on reaching the elbows during ablution, poured the water from above them: The first of these is recorded by Ibn Majah in his Sunan and is considered a sound tradition.

Related versions from other narrators are found in al-Bukhari and Muslim. The second tradition is recorded by Muslim.

The Sunnah is to be consulted for the elaboration. As to whether it is to be proclaimed before the istinja' or after it, the correct view is that it is pro.

The required practices sunan '7 of purificationth are: The washing of the hands before they are immersed in the water utensil," when the person performing ablution wakes up from sleep. This is based on the words of the Prophet God bless him and grant him peace , "Whoever wakes up from sleep is not to dip his hands into the utensil until he has washed them thrice for he does not know where his hand has spent the night.

The proclamation of the name of God, the Exalted, at the beginning of the ablution. This is based on the words of the Prophet God bless him and grant him peace , "There is no minor ablution for one who does not proclaim the name of God". This principle is ignored by the jurist at his own peril. Al-Ayni, vol. IR Wudie minor ablution.

The tradition of Abu. Madmadah and istinshaq rinsing the mouth and drawing water into the nostrils is required, because the Prophet God bless him and grant him peace performed both acts persistently. The manner of doing this is to rinse the mouth thrice taking fresh water each time.

The drawing of water into the nostrils is done the same way. All this is related about the ablution performed by the Prophet God bless him and grant him peace. It is a sunnah to do so with the water used for the head, in our view, although al-Shafi'i God bless him disagrees. The basis of his opinion is the saying of the Prophet God bless him and grant him peace , "The ears are part of the head. Takhlil of the beard passing fingers through the beard is required.

The legal basis is that Jibril passed on the command for doing. It is also transmitted by al-Hakam in al-Mustadrak, and he said that it is a tradition with sound isnad.

The primary reason for its popularity is the reliability of its statements and the soundness of its legal reasoning. Most researchers and scholars first consult al-Hidayah before they move to another source. In the area of Muslim personal law, it has been the major source relied upon by courts in Pakistan, Bangladesh and India. The need for this book, since the day it was written, led to the writing of well over forty commentaries and glosses on it, and this does not include the books written to document its traditions.

This is rare not only for Islamic law, but for any field of knowledge. This commentary is called the Hidayah. Abi Bakr b. Imran Ahsan Khan Nyazee. The Hidayah has dominated the field of Islamic jurisprudence since the day it was written over years ago. It has been the primary text used by Muslim jurists to issue authentic and reliable rulings on Islamic law according to the school of Imam Abu Hanifa d.

The Hidayah commands such an authoritative position amongst the doctors of law that the knowle The Hidayah has dominated the field of Islamic jurisprudence since the day it was written over years ago.

The Hidayah commands such an authoritative position amongst the doctors of law that the knowledge of a scholar who has not read it is not considered reliable. Around 7o huge commentaries, some spread over more than a dozen volumes, have been written on it. The number of explanatory glosses is in thousands. Comprehensive in content and conveniently organised, with the publication of this book all previous works that discussed Islamic jurisprudence according to The Hanafi law become outmoded and soon fell into disuse.

If revealed books are not taken into account, never has a book received so much attention as the Hidayah. This landmark publication of the Hidayah not only has been translated in its entirety for the first time but has been done so from Arabic, the language in which it was written.

The primary reason for its popularity is the reliability of its statements and the soundness of its legal reasoning. Most researchers and scholars first consult al-Hidayah before they move to another source. In the area of Muslim personal law, it has been the major source relied upon by courts in Pakistan, Bangladesh and India.

The need for this book, since the day it was written, led to the writing of well over forty commentaries and glosses on it, and this does not include the books written to document its traditions. This is rare not only for Islamic law, but for any field of knowledge. In comparing the Mukhtasar of al-Quduri, the book in which al-Hidayah is based upon, we note the following differences: This commentary is called the Hidayah.

This is not the case with al-Quduri [From AmalPress. Get A Copy. More Details Original Title. Friend Reviews. To see what your friends thought of this book, please sign up.

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