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PRAGMATIC PROGRAMMER EBOOK

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What others in the trenches say about The Pragmatic Programmer “The cool thing about this book is that it's great for keeping the programming process fresh. This is the eBook version of the printed book. Straight from the programming trenches, The Pragmatic Programmer cuts through the increasing specialization. Editorial Reviews. ronaldweinland.info Review. Programmers are craftspeople trained to use a certain eBook features: Highlight, take notes, and search in the book; Length: pages; Word Wise: Enabled; Enhanced Typesetting: Enabled; Page Flip: Enabled.


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The Pragmatic Programmer. From Journeyman to Master. Andrew Hunt. David Thomas. ADDISON–WESLEY. An imprint of Addison Wesley Longman, Inc. September 12, The Pragmatic Programmer: From Journeyman to Master has been a classic for eleven years and counting. And now, for the first time ever, . For twenty years, the lessons from The Pragmatic Programmer have helped a Ebook available here—all available ebook formats for one price, with no.

Straight from the programming trenches, The Pragmatic Programmer cuts through the increasing specialization and technicalities of modern software development to examine the core process--taking a requirement and producing working, maintainable code that delights its users. It covers topics ranging from personal responsibility and career development to architectural techniques for keeping your code flexible and easy to adapt and reuse. Read this book, and you'll learn how to Fight software rot; Avoid the trap of duplicating knowledge; Write flexible, dynamic, and adaptable code; Avoid programming by coincidence; Bullet-proof your code with contracts, assertions, and exceptions; Capture real requirements; Test ruthlessly and effectively; Delight your users; Build teams of pragmatic programmers; and Make your developments more precise with automation. Written as a series of self-contained sections and filled with entertaining anecdotes, thoughtful examples, and interesting analogies, The Pragmatic Programmer illustrates the best practices and major pitfalls of many different aspects of software development. Whether you're a new coder, an experienced programmer, or a manager responsible for software projects, use these lessons daily, and you'll quickly see improvements in personal productivity, accuracy, and job satisfaction.

We're primarily programmers of our lives, so generalizin Today is the age of pragmatic programmers not programmers. We're primarily programmers of our lives, so generalizing correspondent terms to both life and programming is not surprising. Pragmatic programming stems from a philosophy of pragmatic thinking. Setting the priority on the philosophy of pragmatic programming, the author sets the tone for an interesting voyage through the principles of pragmatic programming.

While coding: There are worthwhile steps to take along coding which are subtly presented in this book. Here are some: Programming by coincidence: The overconfidence generated under programming by coincidence spells a dangerous point.

It's analogous to our own set of behaviors. There's an overconfidence generated under cognitive ease, which spells a danger point in our judgments, programming by coincidence also takes the same process. The remedy is in a consistent effort to understand the exact procedure and process of each part of code.

Programmer ebook pragmatic

Refactor Early, Refactor Often Refactoring takes courage even in programming. It takes courage to return and claim some of your overrated assumptions and change paradigms , but the supremacy of refactoring shows its role in long term. Clearly, refactoring is an activity that needs to be undertaken slowly, deliberately, and carefully. Since you're setting up new structures, you have to consider refactoring a serious thing.

There are also some valuable insights to take before the project and in pragmatic projects. Overall there is an analogy to draw among pragmatic teams and projects. They comprise an interdependent set of independent parts. Each part is independent in its core and overall these independent parts are interdependent to set a stronger process. May 11, Fatima rated it it was ok Shelves: I didn't like the structure of the book. Some of the concepts were vaguely presented.

I was also bored a little bit while reading it. Some notes Chapter 1. A Pragmatic Philosophy Tip 3: Provide Options, Don't Make Lame Excuses Before you approach anyone to tell them why something can't be done, is late, or is broken, stop and re-evaluate Tip 4: Don't Live with Broken Windows Don't leave "broken windows" bad designs, wrong decisions, or poor code un-repaired Tip 5: Be a Catalyst for Change Start with s I didn't like the structure of the book. Be a Catalyst for Change Start with something, hot water with stones to make a soup and slowly people will be adding ingredients to your water and see how useful it can be Tip 6: Remember the Big Picture Constantly review the project, look out for the big pig picture, things can deteriorate pretty fast Tip 7: Make Quality a Requirements Issue Good software today is better than perfect or great software tomorrow, give your users something to play with and evolve from there Tip 8: Invest Regularly in Your Knowledge Portfolio Learn a new language, read a technical book every quarter, read non-technical books too, take classes, participate in local user groups, stay current, experiment with different environments Tip 9: A Pragmatic Approach Tip Make It Easy to Reuse Through the following: Tip Prototype to Learn Prototyping is a learning experience.

Its value lies not in the code produced, but in the lessons learned. That's really the point of prototyping. Program Close to the Problem domain Tip Estimate to Avoid Surprises Tip Iterate the Schedule with the Code Chapter 3.

The Basic Tools Tip Use a Single Editor Well Tip Don't Panic Tip Learn a Text Manipulation Language Chapter 4. Pragmatic Paranoia Tip Design with Contracts The caller must not pass variables which violate the conditions example: Crash Early Tip Use Exceptions for Exceptional Problems Chapter 5.

Bend or Break Tip Configure, Don't Integrate Tip Always Design for Concurrency Tip Separate Views from Models Chapter 6. While You Are Coding Tip Don't Program by Coincidence plan, document, test Tip Estimate the Order of Your Algorithms Tip Test Your Estimates Tip Refactor Early, Refactor Often "Don't try to refactor and add functionality at the same time.

Design to Test When you design a module, or even a single routine, you should design both its contract and the code to test that contract Tip Before the Project Tip Abstractions Live Longer than Details Tip Are you trying to solve the right problem, or have you been distracted by a peripheral technicality? Why is this thing a problem?

What is it that's making it so hard to solve? Does it have to be done this way? Does it have to be done at all?

A technique that has worked for us in these circumstances is to start prototyping. Some Things Are Better Done than Described As a Pragmatic Programmer, you should tend to view requirements gathering, design, and implementation as different facets of the same process—the delivery of a quality system.

Ebook pragmatic programmer

Distrust environments where requirements are gathered, specifications are written, and then coding starts, all in isolation Chapter 8. Pragmatic Projects Tip Test Early.

Test Often. Test Automatically. Find Bugs Once Tip Sign Your Work Dec 24, Prem rated it it was amazing Shelves: Mar 03, David rated it it was amazing. The beautiful thing about a book like The Pragmatic Programmer is that it sparks ideas when you read it.

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Can you do something more efficiently? Can you do it more elegantly? Can you make the computer do the work instead? I like to think that I already ask myself those questions all the time. Nevertheless, I found myself reading a page or two and then having to stop because I was having a great idea and needed to write it down.

I filled six sheets of letter-size paper with dense, cryptic notes. Th The beautiful thing about a book like The Pragmatic Programmer is that it sparks ideas when you read it. That's six pages of Great Ideas about software.

Many of them had absolutely nothing to do with whatever I was reading in The Pragmatic Programmer at the time. The ideas bubbled up from the bottom of my brain like swamp gas. The experience was as effervescent as it sounds. And completely invigorating.

The Pragmatic Programmer: From Journeyman to Master

I ended the day with a finished book, those six pages of notes, and a whole new enthusiasm for my software projects. I should read these non-language-specific programming books more often! I've loved the "broken windows" theory from the Software Entropy section in the first chapter since I read the excerpt online years ago. I've still never heard a better explanation of what happens when code quality and clarity starts to deteriorate.

The message is clear: It's not going to get better on its own. I love the emphasis on DRY "Don't Repeat Yourself" and the use of simple, elegant tools like domain-specific languages and plain text. Another real stand-out for me was the Tracer Bullets concept from the second chapter.

Programmer ebook pragmatic

It's a wonderfully visual metaphor for building enough of a software system so that you can demonstrate its functionality completely from one end to the other i. What I love most about a tracer bullet system: In my experience, that's a huge benefit. There's a large amount of ground covered and nothing is covered in depth.

Which is great.

The Pragmatic Programmer: From Journeyman to Master [ebook] Andrew Hunt (epub/mobi)

I appreciate the low page count and Hunt and Thomas supply examples to make each concept clear. It's an information-rich and idea-rich book. You could do a lot worse than to simply follow all of its avenues and master them. Much, much worse. Dec 05, Otis Chandler rated it it was amazing Recommends it for: This was a great book for programmers to read. It had a lot of very general, yet very useful advice for programmers.

I loved the broken window theory of programming. Malcolm Gladwell argues the same theory cured New York's crime wave in the 90's in Blink. Nov 07, Ethan rated it really liked it. Oct 24, Viljami Kuosmanen rated it really liked it. This review has been hidden because it contains spoilers. To view it, click here. I enjoyed the pragmatic programmer. Still I found myself skipping sections, especially where I felt the subjects discussed I already had a good grip on.

Other parts just felt dated, like the sections on source control and "modular code" in the age of distributed git, npm and microservices. I would definitely recommend this to programmers looking to up their game. The advice this book gives for you to become a better programmer is solid, and you'll find yourself agreeing with it. You should espec I enjoyed the pragmatic programmer. You should especially pay attention to the more general software design aspects the book discusses.

Just don't get caught up trying to implement every single hardcore system engineering principle the book highlights. Jan 06, Aurelian rated it really liked it Shelves: Re-read it recently, first time maybe years ago. Some parts are still relevant today.

Jan 11, Eric rated it it was amazing.

I don't think I can gush enough about this book. It's the kind of thing I unconsciously resist reading because I know of all the guilty feelings it could provoke. Well, one thing I can tell you is that it's not like that at all.

Oh actually, yes it is. The first chapter starts off gently reminding you that you should be constantly learning new things, for example, a new programming language every year not necessarily because you want to have mastery of that language, but because it's good to ke I don't think I can gush enough about this book.

The first chapter starts off gently reminding you that you should be constantly learning new things, for example, a new programming language every year not necessarily because you want to have mastery of that language, but because it's good to keep your brain flexible, and keep looking at things at a new angle.

And yes, there is a chapter near the end, about ruthless, aggressive testing, seeking out new and exciting ways to break your code. But I think that's all the guilt there is. If you can stomach those two things, the rest of the book is packed with, plain English, fad-free, common sense and not so common sense advice that you can actually apply.

You get a survey of all these cool technologies again, nothing fad-like that you could maybe give a spin to or that you've heard off but never got over the inertia to try out although one wonders how many false problems would just go away if you would just use a purely functional programming language. But the book isn't really about technology, is it? It's about craft and attitude. That's the thing that makes the book so gush worthy.

You read the thing and you realise "oh, so this is how grown-ups hack". I wonder how much of this will actually sink in and affect my daily life as a programmer, though.

Will I be that extra fraction more rigorous in my approach? Will I maybe be a little bit more aggressive, a little bit more disciplined, a little bit more humble? It's worth reading. Maybe owning. Maybe going into little monasteries where every day starts with a Pragmatic Programmer reading "let us code". Jul 20, Ionut Ciuta rated it really liked it Shelves: What an interesting book! Definitely a worthy read and for sure a book I will revisit in the future - mostly because I filled it with post-it notes.

Does this book provide some ground-breaking ezotheric knowledge regarding software development? Don't keep separate copies of important code or data.

The Pragmatic Programmer now in DRM-free ebook | The Pragmatic Bookshelf

Eventually they will get out of sync and lead to madness. Automate everything possible. If you are following 1 , you will wind up doing 2 out of necessity. Keep everything, even the dinkiest script, under source control. With tools like Dropbox that have a "packrat" option, this is easier than ever.

But a formal source control system is preferable. With Safari, you learn the way you learn best. Get unlimited access to videos, live online training, learning paths, books, tutorials, and more. Start Free Trial No credit card required. The Pragmatic Programmer: View table of contents.

Start reading. Read this book, and you'll learn how to Fight software rot; Avoid the trap of duplicating knowledge; Write flexible, dynamic, and adaptable code; Avoid programming by coincidence; Bullet-proof your code with contracts, assertions, and exceptions; Capture real requirements; Test ruthlessly and effectively; Delight your users; Build teams of pragmatic programmers; and Make your developments more precise with automation.

A Pragmatic Philosophy Chapter 2. A Pragmatic Approach Chapter 3. The Basic Tools Chapter 4.