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MRITYUNJAY ENGLISH EBOOK

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Shivaji Sawant's Mrityunjaya is an outstanding instance of such a literary masterpiece in which a contemporary Is there an english translation of this book?. Complete Cyber Security Ebook By Mrityunjay Singh: A success way in ethical hacking written by Mrityunjay Singh Founder, ronaldweinland.info (). He wrote a book Mrityunjay (English: Triumph Over Death) based on Karna, one of the leading characters of the epic Mahabharat. This book was translated in.


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Edition/Format: eBook: Document: Fiction: English: 1st edView all editions and formats. Rating: # Mrityunjay. ronaldweinland.infofication: Literature ronaldweinland.info: Mrityunjaya The Death Conqueror Public Library of India. eBooks and Texts. Bharat Ek Khoj. Now you can download pdf book at Mrutunjay मृत्युंजय (कादंबरी) by Shivaji Sawant Free eBook in PDF. Where can I download free Marathi ebooks novel? #Question name: How can I downnload frree Mrityunjaya Marathi book?.

I was spellbind while reading Mrityunjaya by Shivaji Savant a very well known Marathi writer. In fact words falls short for describing such a magnificent work. Mrityunjaya is originally written in Marathi by Shivaji Savant but for non Marathi readers this excellent book is also translated in other languages like English, Hindi, Kannada and Gujarati. However presently, I think only English, Gujarati and Hindi translation are available along with Marathi of course. The author Shivaji Savant has written Mrityunjaya in an autobiography style about the most unsung and most complicated character of Mahabharata, Karna, the abandoned son of Kunti and God Sun.

I was spellbind while reading Mrityunjaya by Shivaji Savant a very well known Marathi writer. In fact words falls short for describing such a magnificent work. Mrityunjaya is originally written in Marathi by Shivaji Savant but for non Marathi readers this excellent book is also translated in other languages like English, Hindi, Kannada and Gujarati. However presently, I think only English, Gujarati and Hindi translation are available along with Marathi of course.

Mrityunjay

The author Shivaji Savant has written Mrityunjaya in an autobiography style about the most unsung and most complicated character of Mahabharata, Karna, the abandoned son of Kunti and God Sun. The style in which Shivaji Savant has presented this autobiography of Karna is remarkable.

It is not only Karna who is telling his life story but other characters like Kunti , Shon his foster brother, Vrishali his first wife, Duryodhan, and Krishna also adds to the narration from time to time thus drawing a whole new canvas of Mahabharata. The book starts with Karna which is carry forwarded by him and other characters and receives a fabulous end by Krishna. Feelings of all the characters towards Karna has been emoted remarkably well by Shivaji that it touches the bottom of the heart.

Even if you haven't read this book, even if your introduction to Karna is through the Mahabharata alone, you cannot help but feel empathy for the eldest son of Kunti.

Mrityunjaya only deepens it. The book is written from the POV of six characters. Karna opens and takes us closer to the end of his story, interspersed with chapters by Kunti his mother , Duryodhana his best friend , Vrishali his wife , Shon his younger foster brother and a grand ending by the Lord, Sri Krishna himself. Apart from indulging the semi-autobiography of a fictional figure, Sawant touches on one of the biggest realities of human society, one that has not changed since time immemorial.

Even though the protagonist is really the son of the Sun-God himself and as radiant as him, the fact that he was fostered in the hut of a poor charioteer strikes out everything right he ever did in his life. Sawant also takes a few liberties with the original, but the changes he makes only make the story more realistic. The characters of Vrishali and Shon for example, are given such appropriate voices, that you are left wondering whether Sawant had the fortune of stumbling upon some long lost letters written by them.

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One revelation on her part would have brought back his lost glory and honour, although it is commonly believed that the war would have happened anyway. Though the book is a sort of paean to Karna, it never goes overboard with it and tries to show his flaws as well. For all his poweress, Karna comes across as internally turmoiled, insecure man, insecure due to his origins about his place in society and obsessed about being recognized as the best archer of all.

But sadly he was never given the oppurtunity of a level playing field to prove it. If he was denied by Drona during the archery competition at the beginning, then the curses that are heaped on him at the later stage also play a part in ensuring that he remains a tragic hero. It is a matter of conjecture as to what would have happened, if Drona had allowed Karna to compete with Arjuna.

Maybe he would have won, he may have indeed lost, but either way, he would have been a more peaceful man, contended with himself and not obsessed with being the best archer which drives almost all his actions resulting in tragic consequences.

But it was to not be. Another feeling that he tries to reconcile with vainly till the very end is his origin. Karna is shown in a subtle way as being unable to accept fully his origins. Though he loves his parents, proclaims that he is proud to a charioteer's son, some parts of his monologue subtly let it slip that maybe he is not as confident and secure about his origins as he shows.

Maybe he craved that he were born elsewhere, or to put it clearly he may have desired that his parents had been the same but of a higher standing in society. It is borne out by his reactions to the relevation that he is Kunti's son.

It's not any great happiness or anger that he feels towards Kunti. What comes through mainly is the relief that he is Kshatriya after all, that he cannot be insulted for his birth. It implies that he accepts the social order for all his posturing and that instead of trying to remove it, he is more than happy to know that he has actually jumped up in the order.

Interestingly, Samant brings a twist to Karna's much lauded generosity using this turmoil. It is mentioned that his generosity is due to his craving for recognition. This does not reduce the value of his generosity, but only serves to enhance to the reader, the pain that a person must feel on being insulted repeatedly by society for no fault of his own, other than being born in a particular caste and the extreme lengths that he can go to overcome it.

This obsession results in giving his body armour to Indra, therby divesting himself of his greatest protection. The books of Kunti and Krishna more than one for each are middlingly good, but rarely offer any great insight into either Karna or themselves. The initial parts of her monologue are her reminiscences about her childhood, her being gifted by her father Surasena to Kunti Bhoja, her marriage to Pandu, in both cases without anyone asking her preference or her feelings are the best of the lot.

Krishna's monologue too is pretty much the usual one you come to expect. The monologue of Duryodhana is different in that he is shown as a scheming character who treats Karna as more of his personal employee, a weapon to counteract the Pandavas than as his friend.

Yes, I agree that their relationship need not have been as close a friendship as is known generally, but a complete flip around of it results in the relationship becoming completely one-dimensional, with no layers to it. Looks like the author decided to do a paradigm shift of popular perception, but in doing that he actually does Duryodhana an injustice. It cannot have been only personal benefit that made him ally with Karna, as it cannot have been only the goodness of his heart.

If he had been so devious, he could very well have forced Karna to fight under Bheeshma during the first 10 days of the war, instead of agreeing with his decision. Interestingly Aswaththama seems to have a more deeper friendship with Karna than Duryodhana. But ironically, even he abuses Karna in a fit of anger as a charioter's son during a tense moment in the war.

This in a way exemplifies Karna's relationship with most people. However close he gets to them, how much ever he feels respected by them, at some point his origins are used by the same people to taunt him. That brings us to the other 2 books, that of his wife Vrishali and Shom his step-brother. It is with them that he does not feel the insecurity of being insulted at any time.

But he rarely opens up his innermost feelings to even them. The two monologues are basically adulations of Karna by the two, who literally worship the ground he treads on. I had read somewhere else that Karna did not have a happy marital life as his wife who supposedly was royalty, was contempous of his origins and was insulting to him, but here Samant gives us a different version.

Maybe one of the above books could have been done away with for a monologue of Arjuna, it sure would have been interesting to get know his views on his arch rival. Karna's worship of the Sun-god, the unexplainable to him, but not to the reader connect that he feels towards the Sun god are very evocative, as is the part where the Sun god teaches him about the astras. Yes, it is Surya devta who is mentioned as Karna's teacher in the book, because Drona is pre-occupied with teaching the Pandavas and Kshatriyas.

Some other parts too stand out, one being the killing of Sisupala where Karna's eyewitness account of it is almost psychedelic.

The other being Karna's turmoil when Draupathi is being insulted after the game of dice. Torn between wanting to stop Duryodhana and held back by Draupathi's earlier insult of him during her Swayamvar he finally makes the fatal decision of joining Duryodhana.

The tipping point for this is rooted in the human ego as Samant slips in a subtle variation of the events. As Draupathi asks everyone in the royal assembly for help, she sees Karna, meets his eye and then moves away without asking him anything. This spurs Karna to insult her. Ironically it is revealed later that Draupathi did not ask for his help since she was already regretting her insult of Karna at her Swayamvar and did not feel worthy of his assistance.

The part where Karna cuts off his armor to give to Indra and the subsequent description of his skinless body which is translucent is bound to shock you. But alongside such parts, others like the description of the events of the war get monotonous at places as do Shon's and Vrishali's monologues in their adulation of Karna. This is a good, but at times uneven read.

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Personally for me, the best take on the Mahabharata still remains Bhyrappa's Parva. If you have not read Parva and are interested in reading variations on the epic, the first option should be Parva. A digression from the novel.

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At the end of the novel, I found myself thinking about another character in parallel to Karna. If Karna can be said the victim of injustice throughout his life, then what of Eklavya. Probably he was the one who was subjected to the most cruel injustice of them all. Why is he not mentioned as reacting the way that Karna did, why for instance did he not join Duryodhana, Parva mentions Eklavya as joining Duryodhana what happens to him after he gives his guru-dakshina to Drona?

Why is he not spoken about more like Karna, why is he not so much entrenched in the general consciousness like Karna. Is there any contemporary work that shows Eklavya in a different light than the obedient, almost naive character that he is portrayed as generally. At the beginning of the book, Karna tells that he wants to tell his story because the truth has to be known, so why is the truth about Eklavya not told.

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Is it because that Karna was a Kshatriya after all and so had to get his share of fame, albeit posthumously while Eklavya is always in the lower echelon of the social order and hence need not betaken seriously? These thoughts do not have anything to do with this particular novel yes, but it seemed pertinent to discuss and compare both Karna and Ekalyva together.

This book is Karna's life depicting the psychological traumas undergone by the main characters surrounding his life due to social conventions imposed on the people.

This depicts how a low-born man rises high in his ranks though he is insulted time and again in his life. This depicts his internal battle to overcome the difficulties he had in deciding what is moral, just and "dharma".

The first half has a lot of grammatical and spelling error which is not present as much in the second half. This boo This book is Karna's life depicting the psychological traumas undergone by the main characters surrounding his life due to social conventions imposed on the people. This book has various chapters in which Kunti, Shon Karna's brother , Vrishali K's wife and Krishna speaks in first person, trying to explain what they see through their limited resources.

This book helps one to stand in their shoes and view and judge what is right and wrong and diffused. Notable things relevant even today: Caste system which is despised by Karna still exists today.

Women are considered to be sacred and are told to be given utmost respect for a nation to prosper. Kshatriyas ate meat. This has to be the best book I have ever read in my life. It took me 6 months to find a copy of this book here in the US and finally had to ship it from India.

Although it has been translated in many languages, something is always lost in translation so I would recommend people to read it in the original Marathi language. The novel is basically an interpretation of the epic Mahabharat from Karan's a key character in Mahabharat perspective. It explains his mindset, the choices he made and the eq This has to be the best book I have ever read in my life.

It explains his mindset, the choices he made and the equanimity with which he had to face the consequences. For people not versed with Mahabharat, y'all would probably need some more background and readings before you can pick this up. But trust me, its all worth it! Life is worth living to read such books.

Aug 30, Shweta rated it it was amazing Shelves: It takes you to a different world! The reasons for which he stood by Kauravas side makes us look at the epic from a different perspective. The best part is the conflicts that occur in Karna's mind and the decisions made by him. These are the questions that arise in every ones mind. The book helped me resolve many such conflicts and confusions!

This book will remain my inspiration in life. It teaches you the ways to deal with the dilemmas between good and bad ; What all people can do to impede you, but if you can gauge everything and remain true to yourself ,nothing else matters!!

A master piece by Shivaji Sawant! View 2 comments. A beautiful book, powerfully written that captures the character of Karan with such an Essence of his values, struggles and decisions between limited choices. The end chapters of the book has left me with such an emptiness as the one that can be imagined after a war is over. This is a masterpiece of the Mahabharata.

One of the best Book I ever read! Best writing style. Best story. I recommend every reader to read this one if you know Mahabharat. I cried at least for half a day after finishing book - was so much involved. Oct 29, Ashvini rated it really liked it. This is one of the masterpeices of Marathi literature. Though its a bit one sided but compelling reading none the less. One of the best books I have ever read and I will ever read! This review has been hidden because it contains spoilers.

English ebook mrityunjay

To view it, click here. Karna is the most misunderstood character in the epics and this book brings that into light. Just like how a single movie 'Oru Vadakkan Veeragaadha' changed the people's outlook about 'Chandu', 'Karnan' is able to glorify Karna. Karna was one man against the world and he emerges victorious through his death. Karna's birth is something hard to believe. Saint Durvasavu advices 'devahuthi mantra' to Kunthi. She tests it by praying to Sun god, who instantly appears before her and gives her a son and Karna is the most misunderstood character in the epics and this book brings that into light.

She tests it by praying to Sun god, who instantly appears before her and gives her a son and soon disappears. What is the purpose of this mantra if its only result is that it creates such 'bastards', or else puts the mother into lifelong humiliation. How many women would have Durvasavu explained this mantra to?

Nobody knows. As MT Vasudevan Nair thinks, in the age of mortals, this is just the act of having an illicit child, and getting rid of him in the river. But the story is not set in the 21st century, so we dont have to think so deep. Just believe that this can happen. Though born as the eldest pandava, Karna is brought-up by a charioteer family. He suffers humiliation at every point from people for this.

He also ends up in trouble for lying to saint Durvasavu about his caste. Karna's real lineage is revealed in the extraordinary talents that he exhibits right from childhood. He trains hard to become an archer, after being rejected by Dronacharya on the grounds of his inferior caste.

Duryodhana becomes a good friend of Karna and gives him the kingdom of 'Anga'. Though he wanted to use Karna to defeat the Pandavas, in many instances in the story, we feel his friendship to be selfless.

Arjuna is portrayed in many places as swaying from ethics, while Karna holds on to his values even in his dying moments. When Draupadi is stripped in the Hastinapur palace, Karna was the only one in Kaurava side to oppose it.

Whereas Karna is steadfast to moral principles, be it when Indra comes in disguise to as his Armour as alms, or while letting go Bheema missing an opportunity to kill him to fulfil the promise he had given to Kunthi before the Kurukshethra war.

Pandavas may have suffered disgrace, but it is all their own making. It is Yudhishtira himself who pawned Draupadi in the game of gambling. They had to go for exile because they lost, its all part of the game. Atleast in this book, I feel pity for Pandavas for being the puppets at the hand of Draupadi, avenging the dishonour she went through because of their own deeds. Arjuna, does he hesitate a second before beheading the sons of Karna, or before aiming at Karna who was unarmed and trying to get out his chariot stuck in clay.

Krishna plays a skilled diplomat when, before the war he tries to bring Karna to their side by letting him know of his original family. And finally he becomes an opportunist when he shirks his promise to not touch weapons in the war, but to just charioteer Arjuna. There are times when even gods commit deeds that are inferior to that of mere mortals.

There are lot of morals to take away from this story. The major one being that even the most just man can become opportunist, deal with them with caution. Letting go in this world for the glory of it- is it worth it? Is there a life after death where we get rewarded for all our deeds on earth?

If you think so, you are chained by the belief. Sep 29, Karandeep rated it it was amazing. If you have read the Mahabharata in any form, this is a must read. You do not have to be a fan of Karna, read it for a different POV where the Pandavas are not always right. This book takes you through the tumultuous journey of Karna and you'll ride it with him.

I read the Hindi and English versions simultaneously for a better grasp on the story not really used to reading in Hindi. Ashwathamann was a surprise - his wisdom and his love for Karna, wasn't aware of that at all and how a man like hi If you have read the Mahabharata in any form, this is a must read. Ashwathamann was a surprise - his wisdom and his love for Karna, wasn't aware of that at all and how a man like him turns into a beast by the end of the war.

What I really wanted to read was, 1. Her pain and anguish during the 2 day battle between Karna and Arjuna. Duryodhans POV after Karna is dead and how he breaks down and meets his end. This according to me would have been a perfect closure to a wonderful book.

The English translation had basic grammatical errors but I'll let that be as the book in itself is so powerful that I didn't mind the elementary English. A wonderful read! Sep 03, Sarvesh rated it really liked it.

Most of the people got acquainted with the mahabharata through the popular sitcom. And whatever books were dedicated to the subject concentrated on accentuating the plight of pandavas and continued condemnation of duryodhana suyodhana. KARNA remains the most mysterious and intriguing character of Mahabharta, mritunjay delves inside the anals of history plunderin Most of the people got acquainted with the mahabharata through the popular sitcom.

KARNA remains the most mysterious and intriguing character of Mahabharta, mritunjay delves inside the anals of history plundering and conjuring bits and scrapes of detailed info,merging it into a action-cum-drama saga. On completing the book,i found my view point about the great war altered and even an insensitive jerk like me was moved by the sufferings of KARNA. IF you love mythology and wouldnt mind an encore of the story with a fresh narration and perspective,Mrityunjay is the book for you.

Readers also enjoyed. About Shivaji Sawant. Shivaji Sawant.