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THE OTHER WES MOORE BOOK

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Two kids named Wes Moore were born blocks earn your way to a free book! Join Reader The Other Wes Moore by Wes Moore . Discovering Wes Moore. Both Wes Moores grew up in low income environments he probably would not have written The Other Wes Moore if. This review of The Other Wes Moore: One Name, Two Fates explores the role choices and accountability play in youth development. This book illustrates how.


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The Other Wes Moore: One Name, Two Fates [Wes Moore] on ronaldweinland.info * FREE* shipping Wes Moore, the author of this fascinating book, sets out to answer this profound question. In alternating .. Discovering Wes Moore. Wes Moore. find myself thinking of the other Wes Moore, conjuring his image as best I To write this book, I conducted hundreds of hours of interviews with Wes and his. Rate this book In December , the Baltimore Sun ran a small piece about Wes Moore, a local To ask other readers questions about The Other Wes Moore, please sign up. Discovering Wes Moore (The Young Adult Adaptation ).

Introduction In the introduction, Moore the author explains that the book tells the story of himself and another man named Wes Moore, both of whom were born in Baltimore in somewhat similar circumstances. After learning about Wes, Moore begins a correspondence with him that eventually turns into in-person visits in prison. The two men agree to work collaboratively in order to produce a book about their lives that will hopefully give an insight into the nature of destiny and inspire young people to make positive choices. Chapter One begins when Wes is three years old and playfully punches his older sister, Nikki. His mother, Joy, is furious.

In alternating narratives that take readers from heart-wrenching losses to moments of surprising redemption, The Other Wes Moore tells the story of a generation of boys trying to find their way in a hostile world. One went on to be a Rhodes Scholar, decorated combat veteran, White House Fellow, and business leader. The other is serving a life sentence in prison. Here is the story of two boys and the journey of a generation.

The same paper also ran a series of articles about four young men who had allegedly killed a police officer in a spectacularly botched armed robbery. The police were still hunting for two of the suspects who had gone on the lam, a pair of brothers. One was named Wes Moore. But could the criminal Wes Moore have become the author?

That seems to me to be more unlikely, because author Wes has a gift of charisma that draws people to him. Whether it resulted from his life experience or was a factor in his gaining that life experience is a chicken-or-egg question, but it is rare and probably not a fair comparison for another person. Regardless of the strain of the comparison, the book definitely makes it clear that there were factors that existed in the author's life that didn't in the criminal's. One was the presence of an educated mother, and, in the author's case, one that was willing to do whatever it took to make sure her son went down the right path.

The author's mother also had competent family support, something that the criminal's mother sadly lacked. Although both boys grew up fatherless, the circumstances of that fatherlessness were vastly different. It must have a different impact psychologically to know that you had a father that would have been there for you had he not tragically died, than to know that you have a living father that doesn't give a crap about you.

I guess where I'm left is wondering what to do with this information. Yes, we know that having a strong support network makes success possible for kids, regardless of the economics of their birth. I'm left wondering how we give them that network. Can someone else make up for the lack of a strong family base? If so, how? View 1 comment. Jan 12, Jason Arias rated it it was amazing Shelves: This thought provoking book, about two young men from similar backgrounds ultimately branching in two totally different directions, is a stark reminder that the shirking of personal accountability has historically been the downfall of many passionate men and women destined for greatness, yet shackled to self destruction.

Moore writes with a delicate balance that makes the story human without distorting the facts with romanticism. By paralleling the lives of Moore the author and Moore the pris This thought provoking book, about two young men from similar backgrounds ultimately branching in two totally different directions, is a stark reminder that the shirking of personal accountability has historically been the downfall of many passionate men and women destined for greatness, yet shackled to self destruction.

By paralleling the lives of Moore the author and Moore the prisoner serving a life sentence , the reader is able to come to their own conclusions as to why each life took the turns it did.

The beauty of this book is that it isn't a call to arms against some external unfairness, some ominous portrayal of The Man, but rather a reminder that anything is possible if you do not succumb to the environment you are in, anything achievable if you believe in the person you were meant to be, and anything surmountable in the face of adversity. It's time for each of us to take accountability for our shortcomings, get back up on that horse, and take back the reins of our dignity.

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I'm a great believer in luck, and I find that the harder I work, the more of it I have. Aug 29, Felipe Cordoba rated it liked it. From the moment I picked it up at the library and read the summary, Wes Moore struck me as one of the folks who particularly enjoys telling others of his success and makes it a point to demonstrate how another man by the same name is a failure.

Although I do respect him for his accomplishments and look up to how he escaped the Baltimore projects, it was hard to imagine an author being very philosophical when comparing himself to another. Posing questions that ponder the sole moment or decisions that made their lives different is nearly impossible. This lack of a single answer is very interesting to me but makes me wonder if there really is any connection between the two besides their names and fatherless childhoods.

I find it a little far-fetched to compare two different people at such a personal level because after all, no one person is the same as the next. The idea of the book is great and I feel as if I am looking at the same person in an alternate dimension, but in reality these are just two different men who made different decisions and ended up in different positions. Apr 24, Emily rated it did not like it Shelves: I was very excited for this book, only to be let down.

Wes Moore the "successful" one spends a lot of the book describing WHAT happens, without exploring WHY things might have transpired the way that they did. The fact is, the Wes Moore in prison never, ever could have had the same story as the "successful" Wes Moore, and it is very unlikely that the "successful" Wes Moore could have ended up in prison like the "unsuccessful" Wes Moore.

Why not? The author came from a family with two suc I was very excited for this book, only to be let down. The author came from a family with two successful, college educated parents.

Table of Contents: The other Wes Moore :

His mother became as single mother, but it was because his father died, not because he left the family. While they didn't have a lot of money, there were a lot of other social forces in play that prevented him from taking the path of the "Other Wes Moore," whose mother was uneducated.

This was largely in part because of Reaganomics- it would have been really interesting for the author to research into this topic some more, maybe add an opinion in there, instead of treating it as something that she should have been able to "overcome. Who did the Other Wes Moore know?

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His older brother who is now also in prison with him. Mostly, this book seemed like a way to 1. I'm from the hood!

Book moore other the wes

I tagged a building once! Decent book but if you've read the inside cover, you've basically read the book. Apr 02, C rated it really liked it Shelves: This review is based on a set of advance proofs which I won in a Goodreads Giveaway.

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The Other Wes Moore is a fascinating look at the lives of two men, both named Wes Moore, both from low-income families, both from un-privileged urban backgrounds.

One man sits in prison for life, convicted of participation in a robbery and the murder of a police officer, while the other went on to enjoy every success that a young man can enjoy. The author, the Wes Moore who went on to become a Rhodes Scholar and This review is based on a set of advance proofs which I won in a Goodreads Giveaway. The author, the Wes Moore who went on to become a Rhodes Scholar and White House Fellow, does not pretend to be able to explain the vagaries of life, of these two lives.

He seeks the answer to "why" as much as the reader does: Why was one Wes able to move out of the decayed neighborhoods of America's cities while the other could or would not?

Wes Moore has written an excellent book. I recommend it for anyone who wants to be confronted with some of the most challenging questions today in the United States - how can we both help and encourage young people to make good choices, to rise about their circumstances?

How can we change institutions to make sure that young people, like the other Wes Moore, don't fall through the cracks? View all 5 comments. Dec 28, Cflack rated it liked it. I am reading this book during a very difficult time in the city where I live. This fall, and more specifically the last three weeks, there have been four shootings and three deaths of black males between the ages of 15 and As someone who grew up in this community and has chosen to raise a family here, we as a community are grappling with these senseless deaths.

I would not say that Wes Moore is a great writer, but he is an eloquent and impassioned writer on this subject which touches him ver I am reading this book during a very difficult time in the city where I live.

I would not say that Wes Moore is a great writer, but he is an eloquent and impassioned writer on this subject which touches him very personally and deeply. He follows his path and that of the other Wes Moore which end up in very different places. It was a painful book to read, but also an important one, if for no other reasons than to start to grapple with very difficult questions about what we can do as a community to help others among us to find successful paths.

May 18, Tamara Sam rated it really liked it Shelves: I literally finished this book cover-to-cover in less than 24hrs. I failed. Instead, I was able to see all the benefits of family, support, exposure, and shared knowledge once placed in the hands of someone who determines to take advantage of it. I pray God shows me how to be the best parent, and a mentor to anyone He brings along my path. But more importantly, I pray that we find a way to give as many young people as we can options in life, so that when they are ready to make long term decisions about their life, they have something concrete to refer to.

Loved the presentation of this book and the journey it took me through. It is pretty powerful because of how it made me think, reflect, and challenge myself after reading it. Two thumbs up! Jul 02, Walter rated it liked it. Maybe my expectations were too high for this book: I had seen its author on Tavis Smiley's television show and read a couple of very positive reviews of it, so I really expected to be blown away by The Other Wes Moore.

Other wes book the moore

In a word, I was not. It's an interesting story of two men who share a name and a background who choose very different paths. This is a good beginning; unfortunately, the execution thereafter leaves something to be desired. The author, the "good" Wes Moore, begins life in a tough Maybe my expectations were too high for this book: The "bad" one starts in the same place and ends up in prison for life.

The point of the book is to examine why these two men ended up taking such wildly divergent paths and, ostensibly, how to encourage more people to emulate the good one. Except that the parallels in their stories aren't quite as compelling as they may appear initially. For example, the good Wes Moore spends a number of his formative years living in the Bronx, NY, whereas his namesake never leaves Baltimore and its suburbs.

The Other Wes Moore: One Name, Two Fates (Paperback)

Though the good one is shipped off to military school after his antisocial behavior in a privileged private school , his educational path is decidely better than his namesake's because of his mother's ambition. The other doesn't have this much support or as much "push" from home, although his mother was encouraging of his positive development. Further, the bad Wes Moore has an older brother who in trying to dissuade him from pursuing his own example of a life in the streets ends up encouraging him to do just that, whereas the author has no such close relation or relationship dragging him down.

Still, all of this would be minor were it not for the reality that the author is far more adept at relaying his namesake's historical story than at penetrating the latter's world in the present, especially the part that begins after he is convicted of perpetrating a life-changing crime. The bad Wes Moore never quite comes to life as vividly as does the author, so he is not a particulary compelling figure with whom to compare and contrast.

As such, then, this weakens the impact of the book significantly. This being said, there is an incredibly compelling story of the author's being influenced by a mentor to explore the Rhodes opportunity and then of his travel to South Africa for study during one of his collegiate years.

Simply put, this passage near the end of the book comprised for me the most compelling ten pages in it. It is because of this moving section of the book that I recommend that it be read. Simply put, this excerpt is so powerfully and movingly relayed that it makes reading the rest of the book worth it or, just read these ten pages and be amazed by their profundity and meaning.

The same could also be said of a section early in the book in which the author describes his father and the influence that he has early in his son's life. In summary, then, I liked The Other Wes Moore but was disappointed because I expected to love it after having read about it and seen it previewed on TV. Perhaps if I hadn't had as much exposure to it before reading it I would have a different reaction to it, so I encourage others to keep this in mind as they consider reading it. Wes Moore is an interesting young man whom you cannot help but admire, so his contribution of this book is meaningful.

I wish that he had been able to bring his namesake's essence to the fore as powerfully, but I would nonetheless recommend this book to others.

May 08, Deka rated it it was amazing Shelves: Nov 30, Ms. Parks rated it really liked it. Yet he was genuinely enjoying a book. So, I picked up the book with the intentions of seeing if this is a book worth teaching to my students.

The Other Wes Moore

The Other Wes Moore is a true story that examines what really makes the difference between people growing up in similar circumstances: Two different men, strangers to each other, grow up without a father, in same neighborhood in inner-city Baltimore, and share the same name: Wes Moore.

We Moore the author goes to college, becomes a Rhodes Scholar, attends Oxford, studies abroad in South Africa, serves in the military, befriends some of the most influential people in the nation, and has a bright future ahead of him. The other Wes Moore drops out of school, deals drugs, fathers children with different mothers, and ends up in prison for life.

Finally, Wes wrote to the other Wes in prison requesting an interview, and the book took off from there. There is one bright spot in the book for the other Wes, though, and I thought things were going to finally turn around: That was the saddest part of the story for me. Just like my student at Pattonville, I strongly recommend this book. Really, I think that anyone who is a teenager, or who works with teenagers, or anyone interested in the human experience, will benefit from reading this fascinating, fast-paced book.

View all 13 comments. I think the premise for this was super interesting, and it had a lot of potential to be a really heartfelt read, because I quite liked some of the scenes, but in the long run the book fell a little flat for me. It was a lot of "tell", not "show", and it started to feel like a timeline of life events that I think could have been improved with more emotional emphasis.

I also really loved the bits about South Africa and apartheid, and having just finished reading Trevor Noah's Born a Crime: Stories I think the premise for this was super interesting, and it had a lot of potential to be a really heartfelt read, because I quite liked some of the scenes, but in the long run the book fell a little flat for me. Stories From a South African Childhood , it was really interesting to read more about it from a different perspective. Oct 15, Richard Derus rated it liked it.

This review has been revised and can now be found at Expendable Mudge Muses Aloud! Jul 05, Beth Sammons rated it really liked it. An eye opening book especially for a 40ish sheltered white woman. The prevailing question of the book: Well to be honest it doesn't take a rocket scientist There is a difference in a father dying and the other walking away There is a difference of education for the parents and grandparents There is a difference in support system 4.

One mother mortgages her life to remove her child from a bad situation, the other shrugs and lights a joint There is a difference in l An eye opening book especially for a 40ish sheltered white woman. There is a difference in lifestyle, one waits until marriage to have children 6.

There is a difference in religious background 7. One family immigrated, they were the family that stuck together, had higher education as a high priority and many other factors that show that 2nd, third generation families have higher expectations recommended read Thomas sowell a black economists who has an amazing prospective on this topic Many might say I am viewing this through the shades of white privilege But you can not deny the facts listed above.

Many have said author is bragging about his accomplishments, hmm he earned it! He busted his butt in military school, service to country, took advantage of opportunities presented to him AND he appears to be working toward mentoring others -the call to action at the end is very inspiring to others to spend their time or treasures to help others from going down the wrong path.

I have passed this book onto a coworker for her 12 year old grandson to read. I hope it gets passed on further to inspire others! Jun 14, Katrina rated it liked it. I was skeptical in even choosing this book to read. I didn't know what Moore's politics were going to be like. Was this going to be another "I-made-it-so-you-can-too" book? I mean, where can you go when you're comparing yourself to someone who "didn't make it"? Thankfully, I think it digs deeper than that, but not as deeply as I think it could have.

Certainly Moore recognizes that many people were influential in his success--one glance at his acknowledgments shows that-- but what about the money I was skeptical in even choosing this book to read.

Certainly Moore recognizes that many people were influential in his success--one glance at his acknowledgments shows that-- but what about the money? Moore's mother struggles, but accomplishes to send him to elite private schools. The author writes about his tough childhood, and eventually his family sent him to military school to straighten up. The exp This book was disappointing.

The experience changed his life, giving him discipline, confidence, and respect. He later graduated from Johns Hopkins University, became a Rhodes scholar, and served in Afghanistan. In short, the author has an inspiring story and is a positive role model for troubled youth.

But where the book doesn't work is when the author interviews the "other Wes Moore," the one in prison for an armed robbery in Baltimore that killed a police officer. The other Wes also had a tough childhood, and got caught up in a drug-dealing gang.