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LONG HAUL BOOK

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But Murphy, the author of “The Long Haul: A Trucker's Tales of Life on the Road,” is She Pulled Her Debut Book When Critics Found It Racist. Diary of a Wimpy Kid: The Long Haul is a children's novel written by Jeff Kinney and is the ninth book in the Diary of a Wimpy Kid series. On April 28, “What stays in your mind at the end of The Long Haul is that feeling of flight. Philosophically, emotionally, practically, Murphy has found ways to feel at home.


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Start by marking “The Long Haul: A Trucker's Tales of Life on the Road” as Want to Read: He started working as a long-haul trucker in The Long Haul is his first book. A long-haul mover's rollicking account of life out on the Big Slab. More than thirty years Author interviews, book reviews, editors' picks, and more. Read it now. Editorial Reviews. Review. "There's nothing semi about Finn Murphy's trucking tales of The Long Haul." - Vanity Fair, Books of the Summer About the.

You think easing a foot rig through snowy Loveland Pass high in the Rockies requires steel-reinforced nerves? His point is that these long-distance movers need superb navigational skills and spatial sense in addition to the usual trucking expertise. They need to be able to drive on both the cobblestone streets of Manhattan and the back roads of rural Virginia; they need to drive gracefully in reverse; they need to know how to do U-turns in spaces the size of a teacup. Having a keen spatial sense is also required for loading furniture, obviously. Murphy likens organizing his rig to a three-dimensional game of Tetris. Driving a tractor without a trailer; driving an empty truck; those tiny green mile markers freckling the interstate.

Add your rating See all 4 parent reviews. Add your rating See all 25 kid reviews. Greg's all ready to kick back for a whole summer in his basement playing video games. Then Mom springs a surprise on the whole family: Even worse: They're expected to play family games and listen to Spanish-language CDs the whole way to county fairs and roadside landmarks.

Of course Greg's mom's perfect family vacation starts to go awry before they even leave the driveway. Then there's the stinky motel, a biting pig, a busted radiator, those awful gas station bathrooms There are brief moments where the family listens to her Spanish CDs -- especially little Manny, apparently -- and everyone plays the car games she's brought and eats her healthy "Mom Meal" lunches.

But mostly the trip goes wrong. It's like author Jeff Kinney has the road-trip-misadventure checklist handy: Families can talk about real family car trips.

Are they perfect like the ones in Greg's mom's magazine? Or are they closer to how Greg's family experiences them? Are you allowed electronics during family time? If not, do kids and parents follow this rule together? Common Sense Media's unbiased ratings are created by expert reviewers and aren't influenced by the product's creators or by any of our funders, affiliates, or partners.

See how we rate. Common Sense Media, a nonprofit organization, earns a small affiliate fee from site or iTunes when you use our links to make a download. Thank you for your support. Our ratings are based on child development best practices. We display the minimum age for which content is developmentally appropriate.

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Want personalized picks that fit your family? Set preferences to see our top age-appropriate picks for your kids. Diary of a Wimpy Kid: The Long Haul. Book review by Carrie R. Wheadon , Common Sense Media. Family road trip goes hilariously awry in 9th installment. Jeff Kinney Humor Rate book. Read or download. Popular with kids. Based on 4 reviews. Based on 25 reviews. Get it now Searching for streaming and downloading options Common Sense is a nonprofit organization.

Book long haul

Your download helps us remain independent and ad-free. Get it now on Searching for streaming and downloading options A lot or a little? The parents' guide to what's in this book.

Educational Value. Positive Messages. A flashback to Dad at the grill swearing, showing the words as symbols. Continue reading Show less.

Stay up to date on new reviews. Showing Rating details. More filters. Sort order. The last chapter in the book is brilliant but unusual because the author says he was asked not to say anything about what went on, so he isn't going to, and he doesn't! And it is still the best chapter, genius writing!

I loved the book. Yesterday driving up the interstate I was looking at all the trucks, tractors and trailers and seeing the furniture movers and thinking to myself, 'bedbuggers. Bottom of the truckers' hierarchy but top of the high rollers for money.

Diary of a Wimpy Kid: The Long Haul

Remember in Fahrenheit where the fireman's wife was addicted to interactive television and they sent fireman crews out to burn books? That mission has been largely accomplished in middleclass America and they didn't need the firemen.

The interactive electronics took care of it without the violence," True.

And electronic books can be altered to reflect the changing times if someone in power, a government, Bezos, or the author deems it necessary. Music to listen to: View all 16 comments. Norton Company publication. So, I settled in, ready to hear some interesting tales, perhaps a few suspenseful moments of The Long Haul: So, I settled in, ready to hear some interesting tales, perhaps a few suspenseful moments of danger, and maybe a human -interest story or two, as well.

What I got, though, was so much more than that.

Diary of a Wimpy Kid: The Long Haul - Wikipedia

Finn Murphy has such an honest and genuine voice and seems like he would be quite an interesting person, if I were to ever meet him in person.

The job requires an enormous amount of physical stamina, specialized knowledge, and tact. I am, as John McPhee called it, the undisputed admiral of my fleet of one.

Discovering the ins and outs of his business was fascinating, and because I spent my entire working life dealing with the public I could relate to some of his frustrations when it came to customer service and overblown expectations. I admired his unapologetic approach, exposing his stubbornness, but also revealing the pride he takes in his job. This book is very informative and is certainly a learning experience, but it was also quite touching and emotional at times.

He chose, with great care, I think, which experiences he wanted to share with the reader, and I believe he chose well. Overall, this was an educational memoir, which was so interesting, I read it in one evening. Once you hear Finn's story, and get an idea of what it might be like to make long distance hauls, or work in the moving business, you will have a much greater appreciation for the job they do!

I highly recommend this book and I think most of you will come to like Finn and respect him, and his job, a great deal! View all 31 comments. Really interesting book about long haul trucking. I wanted more narrative cohesion. This is more a series of vignettes than a unified narrative. But the writer is fascinating and there is so much information here about how moving works. Also some unexpected insights on race and class. The book is worth reading for that and also just the love this guy has for his work.

View 2 comments. Fascinating read about long haul trucking and the moving industry.

Book long haul

I was surprised by how much I enjoyed this book. I learned a lot about both industries and definitely have more respect for truckers and movers.

Even if he didn't know it in the beginning, Murphy was made for this job. He has the disposition, discipline, and intellect needed to be successful in the business. Murphy is straightforward and personable; his memoir is one that the average American can relate to in many ways. View all 14 comments. I absolutely love this genre, what I personally call regular-person memoir. There is such a wonderful informal writing style, it's just some dude telling me about his life.

And his life is freaking fascinating. Aug 02, Patti Biley rated it really liked it. Finn Murphy is a long distance mover who has seen and heard it all. Atypical of truckers, he is white, educated and from a middle class background. Murphy cherishes his personal autonomy on the open road, where each job brings its own set of challenges and characters. Finn Murphy is an endearing story teller who let me know what a Jake brake is page xii without my even asking.

This is something I've wanted to know every time I've driven past a sign prohibiting them, even after I figured out I probably don't have any. I learned lots more reading this intelligent memoir: Write lots more, Mr.

View 1 comment. This review has been hidden because it contains spoilers. To view it, click here. I really wanted to like this book. I requested that my library download this book, and to my delight, they did.

I excitedly made a special trip just to pick it up when it arrived and started reading at the first opportunity. Things went downhill from there.

Haul book long

The introduction screamed "pretentious", and the rest of the book just embraced that as a theme and ran with it. The author went to great pains to assure the reader that he was really a white collar guy who CHOSE to do a blue collar job, and I really wanted to like this book. The author went to great pains to assure the reader that he was really a white collar guy who CHOSE to do a blue collar job, and he did it better than all of those "real" blue collar guys.

You know, the ones that drive trucks because they aren't smart enough to do anything else. He wants you to know that he is nothing like everyone else. Also, those other truck drivers are all bullies who shun him.

It has to be simply because he is a mover, it can't have anything to do with his amazing personality. It could be because he is so much smarter and better than them, too. Hmmm, maybe. It doesn't matter, he knows that he's better than all of them anyway.

Book long haul

Instead of "tales of life on the road" as the subtitle states, the stories are all moving stories. He uses these stories to illustrate how awesome he is and how horrid shippers are.

In several of his stories, he mentions how shippers don't trust movers and thinks that they are dishonest. In another story, he brags about cheating an old lady by making her pay shipping costs for 1, pounds of fuel. I guess that doesn't count as dishonest, because the old lady was annoying and had a lot of junk. Clearly, she had it coming. He did seem to get along with a few people, and he used these stories to illustrate how much better he was than someone else: Also, he is really awesome because he hires minorities, and Native Americans love him and think he really is the Great White Mover.

I know that there are a ton of real "tales of life on the road" that would make for interesting reading, but they are not in this book. Maybe some day, someone will collect a few and make an anthology. If so, I will download a copy and donate it to my library to make up for encouraging them to spend money on this book.

What a good book. It's the memoir of an autodidactic gentleman trucker. I'd rank it right up with Hillbilly Elegy by J. A thoughtful view of America from ten feet up in a Freightliner, hauling furniture cross-country. The writing is excellent and the narrator impressive and relatable.

Diary of a Wimpy Kid: The Long Haul (Book 9)

Here's a sample: We flew together for miles doing 65 the whole way We all fell into a groove. Everybody was driving well, everybody was professional, everybody was going fast but not crazy fast, and there was a plane of consciousness that we had together.

It's the closest thing to a Zen experience I know, except when I'm in my loading trance. He pulled away in a glob of diesel smoke and a toot from the air horn. It's unlikely I'll ever see him again. He was a smart, thoughtful, and defeated man caught in the amber of class, education, and diminished expectations for himself and his progeny.

There should be a category of books called, "Learn about the Real America. View all 3 comments. I love learning how other people live and how the heavy work of the world gets done. This likable, thoughtful, observant professional mover says most people would be better off to put more importance on the people in their lives and less on their stuff.

Diary of a Wimpy Kid: The Long Haul (Book 9)

His stories are informative and reassuring for anyone hiring movers, and motivational to anyone who wants to let go of stuff. This review is based on a free review copy sent to my library by the publisher. A "normal person memoir" and an interesting view into the trucking world. I thoroughly enjoyed the visit in Finn's life and learned a lot about about movers and their daily life. He is an amazing story teller and not once did I find myself bored or overwhelmed with technical information but I did learn a lot and realized that my idea of trucking and reality are not exactly the same of course.

A collection of some of his adventures on the road and the people he moved. I like to read about different career paths that people have chosen and I like to read about people that like to read. Finn Murphy covers both. Your standard-issue Mexican or Brazilian is a hardworking Christian who shares a Western historical experience, speaks a Romance language, uses the same alphabet and numbering system, and has similar aspirati I like to read about different career paths that people have chosen and I like to read about people that like to read.

Your standard-issue Mexican or Brazilian is a hardworking Christian who shares a Western historical experience, speaks a Romance language, uses the same alphabet and numbering system, and has similar aspirations. Great title. Downloaded it on Audible. Finn Murphy's parents were not to pleased when he dropped out of college and became a truck driver. Thirty years later he is still packing, loading, and moving other people's prized possessions all over the country and he wouldn't have it any other way.

In this memoir, he shares stories about the people who trust him to move their stuff in one piece, his fellow movers, and the truck drivers he has met along the way. I honestly had low expectations for this book because trucking is not something I Finn Murphy's parents were not to pleased when he dropped out of college and became a truck driver. I honestly had low expectations for this book because trucking is not something I know a lot about or am usually interested in, but The Long Haul really turned out to be an enjoyable read.

I was fascinated with his stories about how moves are executed from the mover's perspective because my husband and I have to move every few years due to his job.

It's comforting to know I am very easygoing with the movers compared to many people. I thought it was interesting that movers are looked down on in the trucking world and I liked Finn's attitude about not caring what others think because he is making a ton of money.

It is obvious that his attitude and hard work have contributed to his success in the industry. My only minor criticism of the book is I would have liked for the author to talk a bit more about his relationships.

It seemed weird to never discuss dating, being involved in a long-term relationship, or his thoughts on having a family. I also would have liked a little more detail about what he did during his time spent away from trucking. Overall, this was a fun read and I felt like I learned a lot about the moving industry. I received a free copy of this book but was under no obligation to post a review.

All views expressed are my honest opinions. Non-fiction book about long haul moving, explaining to the layperson all the interesting, mundane, and arcane details of a trucker's life.

It varied from interesting, thought-provoking, way too detailed I don't need to know pages of minutiae about weight, volume, percentages of payments, etc.

This guy really likes to complain about humanity. Which, I could not agree more, but it has to be more than just an endless string of bitc Non-fiction book about long haul moving, explaining to the layperson all the interesting, mundane, and arcane details of a trucker's life.

Which, I could not agree more, but it has to be more than just an endless string of bitching to be interesting. I became aware that he is a jackass when he said he told a young-looking tollbooth worker "isn't it past your bedtime? The long, drawn-out conversations with different people throughout the book were supposed to come off as unexpectedly intellectual and philosophical, but instead they just really rang false. It's like everyone he spoke to had the same manner of speaking, and every conversation was about deep, meaningful human connection sprinkled liberally with lots of insults and puns.

I've never been less convinced at the accuracy of dialogue in a memoir. It was at times an interesting window into the peripatetic and always-frantically-on-the-move life of a trucker. This was a well written, literate and interesting book.

It had particular value to me since i was once a long-haul mover for NorthAmerican Van Lines, like Murphy, many decades ago. So to be reminded of all the ARDUOUS work I did as a young, small-boned woman - all the complicated physical, emotional, technical and business details that come with it, not to even mention what it takes to drive a big rig all over the US under all sorts of circumstances and in all kinds of weather and the inherent d This was a well written, literate and interesting book.

Reading this book was an unexpected pleasure. Author Finn Murphy dropped out of college after three years and chose to become a long haul truck driver for a company that moves family possessions from one city to another.

In the industry these kind of movers are called bedbuggers and their trucks are called roach coaches. Car haulers are nicknamed parking lot attendants and hazmat truckers are dubbed suicide jockeys. Murphy tells many fascinating stories about shippers, the folks who own the fu Reading this book was an unexpected pleasure. Murphy tells many fascinating stories about shippers, the folks who own the furniture, dishes and other belongings that he carefully packed and loaded on his trailer.

Some are nice people and others are a pain in the backside. In all cases, Finn and his crew of packers and loaders get an intimate glimpse of the shippers and know everything about them within thirty minutes of arrival at their homes.

Murphy made pretty good money but he worked long hard hours. Cola, a mix of Coca-Cola and Dr. He recalls the best part of his job was the independence it gave him along with the constant variety of people served and an ever-shifting landscape. A successful move, as he called it, was everything in the truck delivered on time and the shipper signing off that there would be no claim for loss or damage. This book may not be of interest to everyone. The majority of those moves were during my career in the Marines when I drove the same highways, from one coast to the other, a total of six trips, along with a move to Hawaii and back, plus one to Viet Nam.

Thanks to Finn Murphy, I now have a greater appreciation of the men who got my gear safely from one duty station to the other. I know of no other memoirs of a long-haul mover's life.

So we're fortunate that Finn Murphy has written a good one. In his current "Draft No. He'd already done a trucker The big attraction for top-rank long-haul movers is the money: He has a white-collar I know of no other memoirs of a long-haul mover's life.

But it worked out for him, more or less. The good money is corporate moves for fat cats, who expect near perfection and pay accordingly. Of course, things don't always work out, and you don't start at the top. Finn's account of his first day on the job is classic, culminating with setting his new boss's Cadillac on fire.

Amazingly, he didn't get fired Along the way, he befriends Willy Joyce, an ugly long-haul mover with a talent for attracting pretty college girls.