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DAVE PELZ PUTTING BIBLE EPUB DOWNLOAD

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Dave Pelz'S Putting Bible: The Complete Guide To Mastering The Green (Dave Pelz Scoring Game Series) Read Download PDF/Audiobook id:kyuonzf dkel. Putting. Bible. The Complete Guide to. Mastering the Green. DAVE PELZ with James A. . leaching the putting game in the Dave Pelz Scoring Game Schools. CODE: Download PDF Dave Pelz's Putting Bible: The Complete Guide to Mastering the Green (Dave Pelz Scoring Game Series).


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Size: When I consider that this was their first golf book it is an amazing piece, not only of good literature but of the shear elegance and quality of the product. By the use of modern technology, wonderful contemporary artwork coupled with wizardry of modernising old images; the both of them have created a masterpiece Golf: The Bible of Golf The book and its price will not be to everyone s liking; but this book will outlive any pair Jimmy Choo shoes or the latest Burberry Handbag and will go on to make a sound investment. Nearly pages of golf that has taken 5 years to put together, I can understand the hard work these authors have put into their endeavours. The book has won several book accolades and it is thoroughly deserved.

It ruined my round. My long-iron play was my downfall again. The funny thing is, I measured the error on the yard 3-iron shot and it was 14 yards feet. He hit the same "quality" shot with a 3iron that he hit with a full wedge. He was tickled pink with the wedge; he was red with rage over the 3-iron. But he was convinced he didn't know how to swing a 3-iron. Understanding the Game and Its Realities 15 I say his swing with the 3-iron had the same quality of motion as his swing with the wedge.

The numbers prove it. When you're talking about the performance quality of a swing, the determining factor is the position of the clubface through the precise moments of impact. That motion determines where the ball is going. By measuring the result of the shot, you are measuring athletic performance-how well the player positioned the club through impact.

So how good was he? In the example cited earlier, he was just as good from both places. But the farther you get from the green, any given percentage error through impact will produce greater miss distances, and sometimes more serious repercussions. That's an important concept that most golfers don't understand. I have walked and measured the courses, learning and charting the yardage between virtually every tee and every pin, bunker, and tree. I have taken all my data during tournament rounds, because when I first came upon the concept I tried it during practice rounds, which were less costly to get into this was when I had no money and I needed to conserve dollars.

However, I found that the pros don't perform during practice rounds: They don't complete their rounds, they don't hit all their shots, they don't putt out, and they don't care about performance. They just hit balls, sometimes trying bizarre shots to determine distances or the effects of the wind. Often they pick up and walk, worrying more about distances than firing at the flag. This is an interesting sidelight to the Tour players. They really don't work on their games during practice rounds.

They study the golf course. They hit shots to see what kinds of reactions they'll get from the greens, the fairways, and the bunkers, and they learn how to fit their games to the different courses they play.

It's fascinating. Watch the pros during a practice round; unless there's some money on the line-which there sometimes is-they aren't playing. They're learning. So to compile PEI data, I had to measure shot results during tournament rounds. There I was, Thursday morning at , with the first group on the first tee.

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Who were they? And, as you might expect, it was pouring rain. I was carrying a great big lab notebook Fig. I was 6 feet 5, weighed pounds, and I was the gallery. No one else was out there. Not many had yet heard of these three guys, but I was with them for every shot.

All the way, in the rain. They teed off. I'd watch each one hit the ball, scanning the sky for it, then run down outside the ropes to measure where the shot finished.

I tried to determine where they were aimed-at the center or the side of the fairway-so I could later figure the percentage error for the drive. I did this for all three guys. Then they hit their second shots, and I ran to the green, went to one side to see a ball in the bunker, scribbled in my notebook, moved around to see where the second ball was on the green, wrote something else, ran around again to see the third ball, and opened my notebook again.

Man, I was moving around. Later I learned that by the third hole they were saying to each other, "Watch this big fat guy. What in the world do you think he's doing? He introduced himself and said, "Sir, what are you doing?

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He has always been a fine gentleman. I was caught off guard in the rain, didn't quite know what to say, so I stammered out that I was studying his game, trying to determine where his strengths and weaknesses were. He was taken aback and said, "Oh, you're evaluating my game?

He got into it. But when I get some solid statistics, I'm sure I'll find out something. Pelz, when you find out the weaknesses in my game, call me at home anytime.

You just let me know. I met a number of players that way. I was following the group he was in, watching them hit, running down the fairway, taking data in my notebook. The group watched me lumbering along the outskirts of the course, doing my thing.

Then Lanny came over to see me: "Hey, what are you doing?

I'd spoken to a lot of players in a few weeks, become friendly with a few, and by now I knew how to explain my ideas to them. So I started telling Lanny about measuring his shots, how far they finished from his intended target, percentage errors He didn't want to hear any facts, no scientific data, thank you very much; he didn't want to hear anything about it.

Jim Simons and Lanny Wadkins are very different individuals. Simons is analytical, fact-oriented, a numbers sort of guy. Lanny is a total "instinct" player. Don't confuse him with facts. Forget it. Lanny does his thing very well, I should add and isn't interested in what anybody else thinks about it. This was how I initially formed relationships with the Tour players. I can learn something from that.

Golf Strategies- Dave Pelz's Short Game Bible.pdf

I'm not saying that you have to be a scientific type to get something out of this book. Not at all. You don't have to study the numbers or think about percentages 18 Understanding the Game and Its Realities to improve your short game. What you do need, however, is to understand what these numbers have taught me about the short game and how I can help you. Because I can now accurately detect your problems and tell you what to work on. Stay with me and you'll learn what your weaknesses are and how to fix them, and you never have to think about any numbers, I promise.

As soon as I had enough data to talk to the guys, they didn't believe the results. I was showing them cold, hard facts, honest data, no opinion on my part, and they didn't believe it. I learned then that people see their lives through a filter, they see what they want to see. They don't like to face their weaknesses, while they love to talk about their strengths.

They also don't like to practice their weaknesses, while they overpractice their strengths, but more on that later.

They'd say to me, "Look, Pelz, I know I hit a couple of bad shots with that club, but I'm not that bad. I had a couple of bad lies, and you were outside the ropes so you don't know. Then I could walk inside the ropes, I could see the lie, and they couldn't give me a hard time afterward about it being in a divot or the crosswind up at the green. They also could tell me before hitting the shot exactly where they were aiming, and so on.

About this time I switched from my big logbook to a handheld tape recorder. I'd whisper into it where the player was aiming, how far the shot was, where the target was, how far he missed it by, and at the end of the round I entered the data into a computer and did the calculations.

It was a lot of work, but I got it done, and it was accurate. Who Does What, How Well? This was my life for a couple of years. First walking outside the ropes watching players, then caddying for those I got to know well. I got to know, by game if not personally, many players with every club, driver to putter. In one round walking with one group I'd get three complete rounds of golf- Understanding the Game and Its Realities 19 about shots from three guys. If I caddied for someone in the morning, I'd follow three more guys in the afternoon, and I'd measure and record the performance error from every club in their bags on every shot they hit in every round I followed.

As I compiled more data and looked at the percentages, I began seeing patterns. At the start, I learned that for the first 10 rounds I didn't know a player at all. How close was all that mattered. This evaluation carried no bias or qualitative assumptions. It was not an impression or opinion, but a measurable fact. And if this measurement of swing quality proved more closely related to the quality of a golfer's performance, scoring, or number of career wins, then perhaps I had found a new and better way to evaluate both the game and the golfer.

It's only true when the bad-looking swing produces better results, consistently knocking the ball closer to the pin. And the emphasis is on consistently.

I am not saying that swing mechanics are not important. Of course they are. The world's best teachers do a great job of improving swings by teaching simpler, more efficient techniques. I count them among my friends and among golf's "improvement specialists.

Dave Pelz's short game bible : master the finesse swing and lower your score

What matters is performance, and there is a cold, hard, analytical way to measure any golfer's performance, with whatever club is in his hand: Measure where the ball goes. For example, say a golfer is yards from the hole, as illustrated in Figure 2. This is the original distance of the desired shot, assuming the hole is the desired target.

If he hits a pitching wedge and the ball finishes 21 feet from the hole point C , his miss distance or error is the distance from B to C-from the target to the ball's final resting spot. If you divide the shot-error distance B - C , by the original shot distance A - B , your result is the percentage error in this shot. So how good a swing was it? A simple evaluation system: The smaller the error, the better the swing.

Figure 2. The PEI is an assessment of his ability to perform with that club. When I compute an average from more than 1, shots, I consider the PEI an absolute indication of the player's skill with that club. Performance is now one of the key ways 1 evaluate a golf swing.

Back then, when it was new, I tried it out by following Tour players to see how they performed with every club in their bag. Maybe Gay Brewer of the amazing swing was beating other players because he was making better-performing i. I'd know if he was doing something right because that something would be based on performance.

I could find out. I had a way to learn how players play the game. An Analytical Look at the Game 2. I also learned that if he had a PEI of 7 for his shots from yards to the green, sticking the ball about 20 feet from the pin, he would think that wasn't too bad.

From a full wedge swing, a foot putt for birdie was okay. Most pros seemed satisfied with that. What he wasn't happy with was having a yard shot, hitting his 3-iron, and plugging the ball into the bunker. From the plugged lie he couldn't blast out close to the pin, meaning he had to get real aggressive to save his par.

So he rolled his first par-saving putt four feet past, missed the putt coming back, and took a double bogey. After his round he said, "My 3-iron killed me! I'm a terrible long-iron player.

I hit my 3-iron 40 feet left of the hole and it cost me a double bogey. It ruined my round. My long-iron play was my downfall again. The funny thing is, I measured the error on the yard 3-iron shot and it was 14 yards feet. He hit the same "quality" shot with a 3iron that he hit with a full wedge. He was tickled pink with the wedge; he was red with rage over the 3-iron.

But he was convinced he didn't know how to swing a 3-iron. Understanding the Game and Its Realities 15 I say his swing with the 3-iron had the same quality of motion as his swing with the wedge. The numbers prove it. When you're talking about the performance quality of a swing, the determining factor is the position of the clubface through the precise moments of impact. That motion determines where the ball is going.

By measuring the result of the shot, you are measuring athletic performance-how well the player positioned the club through impact. So how good was he? In the example cited earlier, he was just as good from both places. But the farther you get from the green, any given percentage error through impact will produce greater miss distances, and sometimes more serious repercussions. That's an important concept that most golfers don't understand.

I have walked and measured the courses, learning and charting the yardage between virtually every tee and every pin, bunker, and tree. I have taken all my data during tournament rounds, because when I first came upon the concept I tried it during practice rounds, which were less costly to get into this was when I had no money and I needed to conserve dollars.

However, I found that the pros don't perform during practice rounds: They don't complete their rounds, they don't hit all their shots, they don't putt out, and they don't care about performance. They just hit balls, sometimes trying bizarre shots to determine distances or the effects of the wind.

Often they pick up and walk, worrying more about distances than firing at the flag.

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This is an interesting sidelight to the Tour players. They really don't work on their games during practice rounds. They study the golf course. They hit shots to see what kinds of reactions they'll get from the greens, the fairways, and the bunkers, and they learn how to fit their games to the different courses they play. It's fascinating. Watch the pros during a practice round; unless there's some money on the line-which there sometimes is-they aren't playing. They're learning. So to compile PEI data, I had to measure shot results during tournament rounds.

There I was, Thursday morning at , with the first group on the first tee. Who were they? And, as you might expect, it was pouring rain. I was carrying a great big lab notebook Fig. I was 6 feet 5, weighed pounds, and I was the gallery. No one else was out there. Not many had yet heard of these three guys, but I was with them for every shot. All the way, in the rain. They teed off. I'd watch each one hit the ball, scanning the sky for it, then run down outside the ropes to measure where the shot finished.

I tried to determine where they were aimed-at the center or the side of the fairway-so I could later figure the percentage error for the drive.

I did this for all three guys. Then they hit their second shots, and I ran to the green, went to one side to see a ball in the bunker, scribbled in my notebook, moved around to see where the second ball was on the green, wrote something else, ran around again to see the third ball, and opened my notebook again.

Man, I was moving around. Later I learned that by the third hole they were saying to each other, "Watch this big fat guy. What in the world do you think he's doing? He introduced himself and said, "Sir, what are you doing? He has always been a fine gentleman.

Download putting bible dave pelz epub

I was caught off guard in the rain, didn't quite know what to say, so I stammered out that I was studying his game, trying to determine where his strengths and weaknesses were. He was taken aback and said, "Oh, you're evaluating my game? He got into it.

Disqus - Dave Pelz Putting Bible Pdf Download

But when I get some solid statistics, I'm sure I'll find out something. Pelz, when you find out the weaknesses in my game, call me at home anytime.

You just let me know. I met a number of players that way. I was following the group he was in, watching them hit, running down the fairway, taking data in my notebook. The group watched me lumbering along the outskirts of the course, doing my thing. Then Lanny came over to see me: "Hey, what are you doing? I'd spoken to a lot of players in a few weeks, become friendly with a few, and by now I knew how to explain my ideas to them.

Epub download bible pelz putting dave