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DARK FIELDS BOOK

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The Dark Fields [Alan Glynn] on ronaldweinland.info *FREE* The New York Times Book Review Imagine a drug that makes your brain function with perfect efficiency. Bordering on techno-thriller territory, this slick, suspenseful debut imagines a new breed of "smart drug" that produces some deadly side effects. back in that vast obscurity beyond the city, where the dark fields of the republic . dark thoughts about a wide range of subjects, my book for Kerr & Dexter –.


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Media type, Print, e-book, audiobook. Pages, pp. ISBN · The Dark Fields is a techno-thriller novel by Irish writer Alan Glynn. It was re- released in. The Dark Fields book. Read reviews from the world's largest community for readers. Imagine a drug that makes your brain function with perfect efficie. The Dark Fields [Alan Glynn] on ronaldweinland.info The Dark Fields Paperback – January, by Author interviews, book reviews, editors' picks, and more.

Try AbeBooks Description Imagine a drug that made your brain function with perfect efficiency, tapping into your deepest resources of creativity and drive, releasing all the passive knowledge you'd ever accumulated. Imagine a drug that focused you so intensely you could read a stack of books in just a few hours and remember every word, learn a foreign language in the space of a quiet evening at home. Imagine a drug that allowed you to process information so quickly you could see patterns in the stock market, a drug that made you so charming you could seduce a room full of strangers in a matter of minutes, or land any job you wanted. Eddie Spinola is on such a drug. It's called MDT, and it's success in a bottle - a designer drug that's re-designing his life. MDT is helping Eddie to become the kind of man he's always dreamed of being, but as he morphs into the picture of intellectual and financial success on the outside, he starts falling apart on the inside - headaches, blackouts, violent outbursts. But now it's too late to go back; he's hooked, and the supply that once seemed limitless is starting to dwindle.

Good, but very different from the movie. Recall that this book was originally named "The Dark Fields" and written by a brooding Irishman. Don't expect the same story arc or ending as you find in a Hollywood movie named "Limitless. They tell different stories and tell them in different ways.

In the movie, Robert De Niro has a line that goes something like "Your powers are unearned to date. Nothing is unearned.

Book dark fields

The book is substantially darker, and written with an edgy, literary feel that reminds me of an early William Gibson novel. Like a lot of those early Gibson novels, Limitless is ultimately about the transplantation of humanity into technology, and the conflict that comes from that. Humans are still human, after all.

I liked this book and it is a quick read - perfect for folks looking for intelligent, speculative science fiction. The central thesis is not new in the strictest sense, but it is freshly delivered in a taut and quick-paced thriller.

View 1 comment. Jul 02, Lucy rated it liked it Shelves: This review has been hidden because it contains spoilers.

To view it, click here. I've been meaning to review this book for awhile When I don't feel a big drive to finish a book I know without a lot of examination that it's not four stars, but here's the breakdown anyway. The book got lost in a lot of financial jargon. It went down some tangents where bulk information unrelated to the plot was relayed and I was inclined to skip or skim. It was a case of the research showing too much. Imagine you'r I've been meaning to review this book for awhile Imagine you're writing a book and the character happens to be a mechanic, so you spent a few days shadowing one.

Awesome, your writing is more likely to feel real and won't shame yourself if a legitimate mechanic picks up your book. I except you won't forget the details, the dirt under the finger nails, and that if any of it contributes to the plot then you'll be able to write without pulling stuff out of your ass.

There's a balance because, at the same time, I don't really care about how important my oil changes are. Don't feed me research just because you did it.

Limitless (The Dark Fields)

Only use what is relevant to the story. I can tell you who drugged up Eddie was It was difficult to cheer for him as a character because I had trouble connecting to his ever changing, rootless personality.

I also have major problems with how long it took him to really count how many pills he had and figureout how much time he had left, especially after he saw what less than a dozen pills did to some other people. For a super-genius his behavior was kind of dumb. If you have unlimited intellect provided by a limited supply of pills and your life is totally dependent on that supply of pills The ending of the book was also not my cup of tea. There's a time and place when a dark ending is appropriate, but I felt like I just took a long drive with a guy and then watched him crash his car into a wall.

It wasn't satisfying. Three stars because it was good, it was captivating, it just wasn't as great as it could've been. May 14, Nasrin Saberi Shakib rated it really liked it. I watched the film adaptation Limitless before reading the book.

Usually it is the other way around for me. I thought the book went into the social impact of the drug much better than the movie did. It accomplished this partly by delving into the experience of other users, besides the protagonist. The main premise, as other reviewers have noted, is a new designer drug that enhances the intelligence. The main character, Eddie Spinola, lives an uninspiring life as a contract writer hurrying to m I watched the film adaptation Limitless before reading the book.

The main character, Eddie Spinola, lives an uninspiring life as a contract writer hurrying to meet deadlines for a project of writing captions for some photographs. He is described as middle-aged, in poor health, and pretty mediocre at best. All that changes when he takes a hit of a drug called MDT48 which gives him the motivation to clean his apartment, finish the book in just a few days, and after some time, make him turn his whole life around.

My main take away from this is that that often the real limitations that prevent a person from achieving their ideal selves are self-imposed.

Be it laziness, depression, or a limited attention span, so much of what holds a person back originates in the brain itself. The book offers an elegant solution: I also thought it was interesting that the drug deadens certain human frailties like emotionalism, guilt, and anxiety. Sort of like the Nietzhian super-man who is unable to feel remorse or guilt for his actions, allowing him to stay focused on a self-centered trajectory of improvement. It also touches on some other interesting sub-texts like the nature of addiction, what it is like to deal with pressure and expectations, and how many people would typically define success.

It reminded me a little bit of Ellison's "American Psycho" - both books have the same setting of corporate NYC, both discuss the trappings of wealth and the idea of the billionare as an untouchable demigod, both deal with a protagonist who becomes unable to feel remorse for his actions. Although the movie has a better plot outline and is more coherent,the book is very entertaining in its own right.

Others have noted the movie has a happier ending than the book. True, but the book seems to present a more realistic, if grim, outcome of staying on a performance drug. Unlike a lot of thrillers that are centered around crime or policework this one is set around Wall St and the stock market.

It also provokes some thought about the power that pharmaceutical companies have. I decided to pick this book up because I saw the movie trailer and thought it looked really good. I really hope the movie is better than the book, for once. The story line seemed promising, but it never picked up. Sure, there were a few parts that started to get exciting, but there was nothing in this book that kept me wanting more.

There were way too many irrelevant slow paced parts in the book, a handful of pointless characters Ginny, especially , and the ending was awful. My husband told me I I decided to pick this book up because I saw the movie trailer and thought it looked really good.

My husband told me I should just give up on the book altogether since I was not enjoying it, but I felt invested and thought it would eventually pick up. I was wrong. Another thing that bothered me was that the author is obviously European, and his style of writing showcased that. I don't have anything against European authors, it was just that the story was based on Americans in New York, and the dialogue did not match up.

It shouldn't have bothered me as much as it did, but it is hard to imagine New Yorkers saying they will "phone" someone instead of calling them, pulling their car up to the "kerb", and reading dialogue that clearly wasn't American. It just annoyed me more than anything. I gave the book a chance, but I don't understand how it has almost a four star rating on Goodreads. Maybe it's just not my forte. View all 4 comments. Sep 07, Brooke rated it really liked it Shelves: You will possibly know this as the Bradley Cooper movie Limitless if you go searching for the book, look it up under the movie's title - I don't think it's published under the original title any longer.

The main character, Eddie Spinola, acquires some medication that makes him insanely smart. He absorbs information and processes it so quickly that he learns new languages in a day and is able to play the stock market like a toy xylophone.

Unfortunately, the drug has its downsides as well, as on You will possibly know this as the Bradley Cooper movie Limitless if you go searching for the book, look it up under the movie's title - I don't think it's published under the original title any longer. Unfortunately, the drug has its downsides as well, as one might imagine. Unexpectedly, this book reminded me of American Psycho quite a bit, especially when Eddie relates his interactions with people who are hanging off his every word. It's not so much that Eddie shares Patrick Bateman's sociopathic tendencies, but they share a similar tone when narrating their day-to-day thoughts and concerns.

While not a sociopath, though, it IS pretty clear that the drugs suppress Eddie's conscience and moral compass - and I'll also add that the author does a great job showing this fact rather than ever telling us about it. Definitely worth a read, but the movie is probably more fun due to Bradley Cooper's presence.

View 2 comments. I decided to read the novel because I enjoyed the movie so much. I had taken my family to the movie and they really enjoyed it too. Had the movie been true to the book, I don't think that would've been the case.

I believe the changes were done intentionally so that the movie would have much more entertainment value. I agree wholeheartedly with the reviewer who praised Alan Glynn for the research he did on the various subjects touched on in the book. It very much feels when you read the book that I decided to read the novel because I enjoyed the movie so much. It very much feels when you read the book that the writer is knowledgeable about the topics and about Manhattan.

I have long been a student of peak potential and have read several books on the subject by Tony Robbins, Robin Sharma, Stephen Covey, etc. Whether or not a substance like MDT exists, there is no question in my mind through my own experience with my development and that of family, friends, colleagues and others that we can approach a state of "limitlessness" by doing certain things.

In the book, you'll notice that these certain things include: And based on this impact, I found the book entertaining and inspirational. I'm glad I read the book. They shouldn't have changed the title to match "the Movie", as the two stories are barely connected by names.

The book is The book does a reasonable job of exploring the practical complications of the question "If I am my mind, and chemistry changes my mind, am I still me? The book is a cautionary tale, the movie a paen to chemical technology. I'm no luddite; I'm just saying the book and the movie inhabit opposite ends of a spectrum.

I even enjoyed both of them. The bad guy of the book is a completely different Another jarring thing about the movie is that in the end, Eddie goes on to "win", but there's no retribution for the apparent murder of a woman.

I enjoyed both vehicles, but the book is a much deeper, thought provoking, practical examination of a current philosophical issue, and the movie is - well, just fun. I think having seen the movie, made the book less enjoyable, all the key plot points are in the movie; minus all the long drawn out jargon that the author uses.

In the end the movie is much more enjoyable. View all 8 comments. Apr 09, Jennifer Willis rated it really liked it. If you were offered a pill that would make you smarter, more focused and infinitely more productive, would you take it? Would you bother to ask about the side effects first? Protagonist Eddie Spinola isn't initially told what this tiny pill will do for -- or to -- him, but he knocks back the MDT anyway, and his life immediately becomes a thrilling and unmanageable roller coaster.

I've not seen the movie, "Limitless," based on this book by Alan Glynn. The film previews got me interested in the If you were offered a pill that would make you smarter, more focused and infinitely more productive, would you take it? The film previews got me interested in the story, and when I heard about how it only came to Hollywood's attention when some movie professional found a copy of "The Dark Fields" in a bookstore bargain bin, I knew I had to seek out this title for myself.

It's a great read. Glynn tells an engaging, page-turning story.

I was stopped in my tracks here and there by non-standard according to U. English spellings and punctuation conventions -- Glynn lives in Ireland -- but I was also deeply impressed by the sheer amount of research the author must have done in the preparation and writing of this novel.

He goes into deep detail as he weaves all manner of topics into his story -- from conversational Italian and the principles of 20th-century design to the intricacies of day-trading on the stock market and broadband media corporate mergers. Glynn definitely did his homework, and his story is all the better for it. But throughout the book, the question remains: If you had such a drug available, what would you do?

Toward the end of the extensive exhibit -- full of information about the brain's anatomy and biochemistry, evolution, how we learn and process information and languages, etc.

One display panel talked about advances in pharmacology allowing us to enhance natural abilities and cognitive functions, sort of like steroids for the brain. The exhibit posed a tantalizing and troubling question for conversation: Eddie Spinola's story in "The Dark Fields" may serve as a cautionary tale of the dangers of untested and unregulated neuropsychopharmacology -- that's not really a spoiler, since you know from the very first page that Eddie's in trouble -- but I also wonder if a drug like MDT were truly safe, what people might be able to do with or on it.

Maybe Eddie's problem was that he focused solely on his own gain, rather than trying to make the world a better place, and that the drug didn't and couldn't help him resolve the feelings of unworthiness that lay at his core. I'm also steering clear of the obvious theme of addition here. I have no doubt that there will be -- or may already be -- Eddie Spinolas out in the world as the quiet race for the perfect smart drug continues. I've deliberately not answered the central question of the book -- what would I do?

And because, frankly, I'm not sure. The book was originally published in and was called The Dark Fields. I have to admit, I was completely drawn in right from the very beginning. Eddie Spinola is a bit of a noone. He is single, living in a small messy apartment and not exactly realising his dreams.

Nothing could have prepared him for what happens next. I need it NOW! The idea of being able ot take a pill that literally spurs you into action without feeling mentally, emotionally or physically drained is just so appealing. OK, so there were rather tragic side-effects, but the whole point of drugs is that you believe that YOU would be able to control it. This wasn't a very good book, because it was not very well-written, not because the concept was poor.

There is a drug that makes you all you can be. You are productive, driven, creative, and you can learn very fast. This makes you usually rich and powerful and thin.

Book dark fields

You suffer blackouts well, you do this even while on the drug, and sometimes get aggressive and kill people and don't remember it , have headaches, insomnia This wasn't a very good book, because it was not very well-written, not because the concept was poor.

You suffer blackouts well, you do this even while on the drug, and sometimes get aggressive and kill people and don't remember it , have headaches, insomnia and lose your ability to focus and concentrate — so you end up stupider than when you started. This is a great idea! And how the protagonist comes across a stash, and what the consequences are, etc. But the author tackles this from a scientific and technical and business angle.

He barely even touches on the many interesting psychological, mental and philosophical matters that are brought up by the use of this drug. Very sad to see such a great idea wasted. When I first started this book, I wrote: This book is blowing me away.

If the movie is half as good as this I'll be surprised! Then I got mid way through maybe not even midway and while the action scenes were page turners, the author had a tendency to give excruciating details about what Eddie Spinola great character name!

It was like a condensed history lesson about things I could care less about and that did not further the story alo When I first started this book, I wrote: It was like a condensed history lesson about things I could care less about and that did not further the story along.

I tried really hard to slough through, but I finally gave up. Giving my disappointment with the book, I'm hoping the movie will be better.

Limitless was based upon an interesting concept: The drug also has some interesting side effects: Eddie v Limitless was based upon an interesting concept: Eddie visits his friend to get more of this amazing drug. His friend ends up murdered and Eddie swipes his stash of MDT along with a notebook with what Eddie assumes are lists of his customers. He can converse on any topic and everywhere he goes he is the center of attention. He decides that he is going to invest in the stock market and with his abilities should be able to make a fortune.

This is the part of the book that really bogged down. There was a lot of info about day trading and Eddie gets tied up with a billionaire who is about to merge with another company.

Fields book dark

There were a couple of things that bothered me about this book. First that Eddie never seemed to think about what he was going to do when the drug ran out. I liked that it was written in first-person — I really got a sense of the effect this drug had on him. And there was a surprising, unexpected twist at the end.

This book is a definite page-turner for me. I am reading this book after seeing the movie several months ago.

I notice that many parts were interpreted in the movie and I am recieving a whole new insight on the plot of the story. It is interesting to see the differences between the film and the book. Limitless is a great example of the word Automaton. The dictionary definition for Automaton states the following: The first time I notice this is when he first takes the pill. Eddie returns to his apartment, and over the course of several hours manages to clean his whole apartment and write a great majority of the book he is working on.

Later on that night he crashes and realizes what he has done leading him to want more. Over the course of the book he begins to take more pills which leads to more astonishing events. Eddie realizes that he needs the pill or else he begins to feel very slowed down. The idea of this pill is a very interesting concept to me and so far I have enjoyed reading about it. Although there is a lot of dialogue in this book at times, which I tend to fine boring for the most part, Alan Glynn does a great job of tying it into the story to keep things interesting, which I enjoy.

Normally I would not care for a fictional novel, but this one really intrigues me and makes me want to continue reading.

Definently one of the greater books I have read. I still have some chapters to go, and I hope my enjoyment continues throughout reading this. I would definently recommend this book to anyone who is interested in suspenseful reads.

Jun 24, David Lucero rated it really liked it. I saw this movie because the main character was a writer, burnt out and clueless. As a writer myself I can say I know the feeling. Anyway, I wasn't too thrilled about watching the movie because Bradley Cooper was the lead actor. It's not that I don't think he's any good, but rather he played the role of creep in 'Wedding Crashers' so well that whenever I saw him in another role I couldn't shake the character he played in Wedding Crashers. Well, that has all been erased.

Not only did Cooper do a I saw this movie because the main character was a writer, burnt out and clueless. Not only did Cooper do a good job in the movie version, I loved it so much I decided to read the book the movie was based on.

Fortunately, the movie follows the book very much, which I like. Eddie Spinola is a burnt-out writer who's lost. He can't figure out how to begin his new book and his life seems to be going nowhere. A chance encounter with his ex-brother in-law a former drug dealer introduces him to a new drug with the potential of bringing the very best out of you.

Questions?

The best it brings out of you is enhanced form of thinking. The drug enables the user to access all of their brain capacity. The potential is limitless. But when Eddie begins feeling the side effects he begins to wonder if this was too good a thing.

He can't sleep, he vomits, doesn't eat, can't remember what his past actions are. Soon this wonder drug makes him wonder if it's the end of his life. If you saw the movie 'Limitless' the title of the movie based on Glynn's book you will enjoy this book.

THE DARK FIELDS by Alan Glynn | Kirkus Reviews

It goes into more detail about this type of drug, which has actually been promoted before. You'll find it very enjoyable. It has humor, drama, mystery, action, and suspense, everything a novel needs to be worth your time. David Lucero, author www. I'm wavering between 2 and 3 stars on this one. I love the premise, the idea - and it's not far-fetched at all - that a pill could help us utilise our full mental potential. How addictive that would be! Glynn's writing is good as are his characters.

If anything he overdid the research in my opinion: For me he should have summed this all up in one paragraph: For the next couple of months I analysed and I'm wavering between 2 and 3 stars on this one. For the next couple of months I analysed and mastered the stock market, earning myself a shit-load of money - and then moved on.

And then there's the story's ending, which I'm pleased to hear was rewritten for the film. Yes, the ending is true to life, but this is fiction, not life, so I believe it should have been a bit more hopeful.

Glynn could have done so much more with this great idea. Still, it's worth reading if for no other reason than it makes you think. SciFi urban mystery fans. This was very similar to the movie. I had actually seen Limitless before I read the book and as I'd loved the film wasn't sure at all how the book would hold up. I loved it. The come down is a total bitch! I loved the characters, and its was wonderful seeing in my mind Bradley Cooper as Eddie Spinola.

The book moves at a fast pace and when the deaths and confusion start it go from good to excellent. I picked this book up on a whim as I had seen the film a while ago and hadn't realised that it was actually based on a book. The story is told from the point of view of Eddie Spinola, your average heading towards mid-life crisis type of guy, who is suddenly given the chance to turn his life around with a mystery drug provided by his ex brother in law.

The sudden improvement in his ability to think and do things that seemed to be beyond him before provides for an exhilarating ride as he explores t I picked this book up on a whim as I had seen the film a while ago and hadn't realised that it was actually based on a book. Bordering on techno-thriller territory, this slick, suspenseful debut imagines a new breed of "smart drug" that produces some deadly side effects.

It really works, but Eddie's initial rush is so mind-blowing that even discovering Vernon's murdered body and a hidden stash of cash and pills barely interrupts his growing addiction. He chooses to ignore the mounting side effects of MDT Day trading on the stock market like a seasoned professional, Eddie soon becomes an immensely wealthy junkie armed with awe-inspiring artistic and financial brainpower.

Book dark fields

But when he's implicated in the brutal murder of a high-profile artist's wife and also linked to pharmaceutical espionage, his perfect new world unravels and the shocking truth about MDT's origin and purpose is revealed. Glynn's sustained, rapid-fire pace hurls readers headfirst toward a gripping, if bleak, conclusion that makes for some breathless page-turning. Dublin-based Glynn, who lived in New York for four years, gets the frenzied pace of the city just right.

And though Eddie's demise is foreshadowed from the opening paragraph, his likability as a protagonist serves the swift and thrilling narrative well. Fine secondary characters like shady Russian loan shark Gennady and Eddie's ex-wife Melissa appear in many scenes, but the reader remains riveted to Eddie's fate in this impeccably imagined and executed debut.

Young, hip readers who are open to experimentation will be the first audience for this credible and timely thriller. Word of mouth will do the rest.