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CONTENTS. Introduction: Jonathan Star. Forward: Thomas Troward. The Creative Process in the Individual. 1. The Starting Point. 2. The Self- Contemplation of. THE LAW AND THE WORD by. Thomas Troward. ronaldweinland.info-texts. com/eso/ttlaw/ronaldweinland.info CONTENTS. FOREWORD. SOME FACTS IN NATURE. E-text prepared by John Hagerson, Kevin Handy, and Project Gutenberg Distributed. Proofreaders. Thomas Troward's The Creative Process in the Individual.


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Thomas Troward's Collection of Texts is free at ronaldweinland.info - the free for Great New Thought Book by Thomas Troward include: pdf, Open eBook. Free PDF, epub, Kindle ebook. The material comprised in this Author: Thomas Troward. The Hidden Power By Thomas Troward. Format: Global Grey free PDF. THOMAS TROWARD. THE DORE LECTURES ON MENTAL SCIENCE originating power which we mean when we speak of “The Spirit,” and it is into this Spirit.

My Introduction to Thomas Troward 10 3. Some Troward Letters 22 5. The Teachings of Thomas Troward 39 6. The London New Thought Congress of 67 Troward As Prophet 86 It is through his wise lectures and writings that many famous teachers of metaphysical truths have obtained a deep insight into the science and the heart of spiritual life and experience. The beauty and wisdom of his teachings consist in his solid and consistent instruction of life in fullness and complete- ness.

It can see as well as others the beauty of weakness leaning upon strength; but it sees that the real source of the beauty lies in the strong element of the combination.

The true beauty consists in the power to confer strength, and this power is not to be acquired by submission, but by exactly the opposite method of continually asserting our determination not to submit. Of course, if we take it for granted that all the sorrow, sickness, pain, trouble, and other adversity in the world is the expression of the Will of God, then doubtless we must resign ourselves to the inevitable with all the submission we can muster, and comfort ourselves with the vague hope that somehow in some far-off future we shall find that "Good is the final goal of ill" though even this vague hope is a protest against the very submission we are endeavouring to exercise.

But to make the assumption that the evil of life is the Will of God is to assume what a careful and intelligent study of the laws of the Universe, both mental and physical, will show us is not the truth; and if we turn to that Book which contains the fullest delineation of these Universal laws, we shall find nothing taught more clearly than that submission to the evils of life is not submission to the Will of God.

Life and Light Nothing that obscures life, or restricts it, can proceed from the same source as the Power which gives light to them that sit in darkness, and deliverance to them that are bound. Negation can never be Affirmation; and the error we have always to guard against is that of attributing positive power to the Negative. If we once grasp the truth that God is Life, and that Life in every mode of its expression can never be anything else than Affirmative, then it must become clear to us that nothing which is of the opposite tendency can be according to the Will of God.

For God the good to will any of the "evil" that is in the world would be for Life to act with the purpose of diminishing itself, which contradicts the very idea of Life. God is Life, and Life is, by its very nature, Affirmative. The submission we have hitherto made has been to our own weakness, ignorance, and fear, and not to the supreme good.

Submission to Truth But is no such thing as submission required of us in any circumstances? Are we always to have our own way in everything? Assuredly the whole secret of our progress to liberty is involved in acquiring the habit of submission, but it is submission to superior Truth, not to superior force. It sometimes happens that, when we attain a higher Truth, we find that its reception requires us to rearrange the truths which we possessed before: not, indeed, to lay any of them aside, for Truth once recognised cannot be again put out of sight, but to recognise a different relative proportion between them from that which we had seen previously.

Then there comes a submitting of what has hitherto been our highest truth to one which we recognise as still higher, a process not always easy of attainment, but which must be gone through if our spiritual development is not to be arrested.

The lesser degree of life must be swallowed up in the greater; and for this purpose it is necessary for us to learn that the smaller degree was only a partial and limited aspect of that which is more universal, stronger, and of greater significance in every way. Now, in going through the processes of spiritual growth, there is ample scope for that training in selfknowledge and self-control which is commonly understood by the word "submission". But the character of the act is materially altered.

It is no longer a half-despairing resignation to a superior force external to ourselves which we can only vaguely hope is acting kindly and wisely, but it is an intelligent recognition of the true nature of our own interior forces and of the laws by which a robust spiritual constitution is to be developed; and the submission is no longer to limitations which drain life of its liveliness and against which we instinctively rebel, but to the law of our own evolution which manifests itself in continually increasing degrees of life and strength.

The submission which we recognise is the price that has to be paid for increase in any direction. Even in the Money Market we must invest before we can realise profits. It is a Universal rule that nature obeys us exactly in proportion as we first obey Nature; and this is as true in regard to spiritual science as to physical. The only question is whether we will yield an ignorant submission to the principle of death, or a joyous and intelligent obedience to the principle of Life.

Self-recognition If we have clearly grasped the fact of our identity with the Universal Spirit, we shall find that, in the right direction, there is really no such thing as submission. Submission is to the power of another a man cannot be said to submit to himself. When the "I AM" in us recognises a greater degree of I AM-ness if I may coin the word than it has hitherto attained, then, by the very force of this recognition, it becomes what it sees, and therefore naturally puts off from itself whatever would limit its expression of its own completeness.

But this is a natural process of growth, and not an unnatural act of submission; it is not the pouring-out of ourselves in weakness, but the gathering of ourselves together in increasing strength. There is no weakness in Spirit, it is all strength; and we must therefore always be watchful against the insidious approaches of the Negative which would invert the true position. The Negative always points to some external source of strength.

It always seeks to fix a gulf between us and the Infinite Sufficiency. It would always have us believe that the sufficiency is not our own, but that by an act of uncertain favour we may have occasional spoonfuls of it doled out to us. Jesus' teaching is different. We do not need to come with our pitcher to the well to draw water, like the woman of Samaria, but we have in ourselves an inexhaustible supply of the living water springing up into everlasting life.

Let us then inscribe "No Surrender" in bold characters upon our banner, and advance undaunted to claim our rightful heritage of liberty and life. It represents the sun sending down to the earth innumerable rays, with the peculiarity that each ray terminates in a hand.

This method of representing the sun is so unusual that it suggests the presence in the designer's mind of some idea rather different from those generally associated with the sun as a spiritual emblem.

If I interpret the symbol rightly, it sets forth the truth, not only of the Divine Being as the Great Source of all Life and all Illumination, but also the correlative truth of our individual relation to that centre. Each ray is terminated by a hand, and a hand is the emblem of active working; and I think it would be difficult to give a better symbolical representation of innumerable individualities, each working separately, yet all deriving their activity from a common source.

The hand is at work upon the earth, and the sun, from which it is a ray, is shining in the heavens; but the connecting line shows whence all the strength and skill of the hand are derived. If we look at the microcosm of our own person we find this principle exactly reproduced. Our hand is the instrument by which all our work is done literary, artistic, mechanical, or household but we know that all this work is really the work of the mind, the will- power at the centre of our system, which first determines what is to be done, and then sets the hand to work to do it; and in the doing of it the mind and hand become one, so that the hand is none other than the mind working.

Now, transferring this analogy to the macrocosm, we see that we each stand in the same relation to the Universal Mind that our hand does to our individual mind at least, that is our normal relation; and we shall never put forth our full strength except from this standpoint. Doing and Being We rightly realise our will as the centre of our individuality; but we should do better to picture our individuality as an ellipse rather than a circle, a figure having two "conjugate foci", two equilibrated centres of revolution rather than a single one, one of which is the will-power or faculty of doing, and the other the consciousness or perception of being.

If we realise only one of these two centres we shall lose both mental and moral balance. If we lose sight of that centre which is our personal will, we shall become flabby visionaries without any backbone. If, in our anxiety to develop backbone, we lose sight of the other centre, we shall find that we have lost that which corresponds to the lungs and heart in the physical body, and that our backbone, however perfectly developed, is rapidly drying up for want of those functions which minister vitality to the whole system, and is only fit to be hung up in a museum to show what a rigid, lifeless thing the strongest vertebral column becomes when separated from the organisation by which alone it can receive nourishment.

We must realise the one focus of our individuality as clearly as the other, and bring both into equal balance, if we would develop all our powers and rise to that perfection of Life which has no limits to its glorious possibilities.

Many Hands Keeping the ancient Egyptian symbol before us, and considering ourselves as the hand, we find that we derive all our power from an infinite centre; and because it is infinite we need never fear that we shall fail to draw to ourselves all that we require for our work, whether it be the intelligence to lay hold of the proper tool, or the strength to use it. And, moreover, we learn from the symbol that this central power is generic.

This is a most important truth. It is the centre from which all the hands proceed, and is as fully open to any one hand as to any other. Each hand is doing its separate work, and the whole of the central energy is at its disposal for its own specific purpose. The work of the central energy, as such, is to supply vitality to the hands, and it is they that differentiate this universal power into all the varied forms of application which their different aptitudes and opportunities suggest.

One Mind We, as the hands, live and work because the Central Mind lives and works in us. We are one with it, and it is one with us; and so long as we keep this primal truth before us, we realise ourselves as beings of unlimited goodness and intelligence and power, and we work in the fullness of strength and confidence accordingly; but if we lose sight of this truth, we shall find that the strongest will must get exhausted at last in the unequal struggle of the individual against the Universe.

For if we do not recognise the Central Mind as the source of our vitality, we are literally "fighting for our own hand", and all the other hands are against us, for we have lost the principle of connection with them.

This is what must infallibly happen if we rely on nothing but our individual will-power. But if we realise that the will is the power by which we give out, and that every giving out implies a corresponding taking in, then we shall find in the boundless ocean of central living Spirit the source from which we can go on taking in ad infinitum, and which thus enables us to give out to any extent we please.

Mind and Will But for the wise and effective giving out, a strong and enlightened will is an absolute necessity; and therefore we do well to cultivate the will, or the active side of our nature.

But we must equally cultivate the receptive side also; and when we do this rightly by seeing in the Infinite Mind the one source of supply, our will-power becomes intensified by the knowledge that the whole power of the Infinite is present to back it up.

With this continual sense of Infinite Power behind us we can go calmly and steadily to the accomplishment of any purpose, however difficult, without straining or effort, knowing that it shall be achieved not by the hand only, but by the invincible Mind that works through it. What a common expression! And yet how much it really means, how absolutely everything! We enter into the spirit of an undertaking, into the spirit of a movement, into the spirit of an author, even into the spirit of a game; and it makes all the difference both to us and to that into which we enter.

A game without any spirit is a poor affair; an association in which there is no spirit falls to pieces, and a spiritless undertaking is sure to be a failure. On the other hand, the book which is meaningless to the unsympathetic reader is full of life and suggestion to the one who enters into the spirit of the writer; the man who enters into the spirit of the music finds a spring of refreshment in some fine recital which is entirely missed by the cold critic who comes only to judge according to the standard of a rigid rule; and so on in every case that we can think of.

If we do not enter the spirit of the thing, it has no invigorating effect upon us, and we regard it as dull, insipid, and worthless. This is our everyday experience, and these are the words in which we express it. And the words are well chosen. They show our intuitive recognition of the spirit as the fundamental reality in everything, however small or however great.

Let us be right as to the spirit of a thing, and everything else will successfully follow. By entering into the spirit of anything we establish a mutual vivifying action and reaction between it and ourselves; we vivify it with our own vitality, and it vivifies us with a living interest which we call its spirit; and therefore the more fully we enter into the spirit of all with which we are concerned, the more thoroughly do we become alive. The more completely we do this the more we shall find that we are penetrating into the great secret of Life.

It may seem a truism, but the great secret of Life is its Liveliness, and it is just more of this quality of Liveliness that we want to get hold of; it is that good thing of which we can never have too much. The Negative But every fact implies also its negative, and we never properly understand a thing until we not only know what it is, but also clearly understand what it is not. To a complete understanding the knowledge of the negative is as necessary as the knowledge of the affirmative, for the perfect knowledge consists in realising the relation between the two.

The perfect power grows out of this knowledge by enabling us to balance the affirmative and negative against each other in any proportion that we will, thus giving flexibility to what would otherwise be too rigid, and form to what would otherwise be too fluid.

By uniting these two extremes, we produce any result we may desire. It is the old Hermetic saying, "Coagula et solve" "Solidify the fluid and dissolve the solid"; and therefore, if we would discover the secret of "entering into the spirit of it", we must get some idea of the negative, which is the "not-spirit".

Mechanism In various ages this negative phase has been expressed in different forms of words suitable to the spirit of the time. So, clothing this idea in the attire of the present day, I will sum up the opposite of Spirit in the word "Mechanism".

Before all things this is a mechanical age, and it is astonishing how great a part of what we call our social advance has its root in the mechanical arts. Reduce the mechanical arts to what they were in the days of the Plantagenets [The royal house of England, which reigned from to Ed.

We may not be conscious of all this, but the mechanical tendency of the age has a firm grip upon society at large. We habitually look at the mechanical side of things in preference to any other. Everything is done mechanically, from the carving on a piece of furniture to the arrangement of the social system.

It has to be fitted to the mechanical exigencies. We enter into the mechanism of it instead of into the Spirit of it, and so limit the Spirit and refuse to let it have its own way; and then, as a consequence, we get entirely mechanical action, and complete our circle of ignorance by supposing that this is the only sort of action there is.

The man who can recognise a natural law only as it operates through certain forms of mechanism with which he is familiar will never rise to the construction of the highest forms of mechanism which might be built upon that law, for he fails to see that it is the law which determines the mechanism and not vice versa.

This man will make no advance in science, either theoretical or applied, and the world will never owe any debt of gratitude to him. But the man who recognises that the mechanism for the application of any principle grows out of the true apprehension of the principle studies the principle first, knowing that when that is properly grasped it will necessarily suggest all that is wanted for bringing it into practical use.

And if this is true in regard to so-called "physical" science, it is a fortiori true as regards the Science of Spirit. There is a mechanical attitude of mind which judges everything by the limitations of past experiences, allowing nothing for the fact that those experiences were for the most part the results of our ignorance of spiritual law. But if we realise the true law of Being we shall rise above these mechanical conceptions.

We shall not deny the reality of the body or of the physical world as facts, knowing that they also are Spirit, but we shall learn to deny their power as causes. We shall learn to distinguish between the causa causata and thecausa causans, the secondary or apparent physical cause and the primary or spiritual cause without which the secondary cause would not exist; and so we shall get a new standpoint of clear knowledge and certain power by stepping over the threshold of the mechanical and entering into the spirit of it.

Balance What we have to do is to maintain our even balance between the two extremes, denying neither Spirit nor the mechanism which is its form and through which it works. The one is as necessary to a perfect whole as the other, for there must be an outside as well as an inside; only we must remember that the creative principle is always inside, and that the outside only exhibits what the inside creates. Hence, whatever external effect we would produce, we must first enter into the spirit of it and work upon the spiritual principle, whether in ourselves or in others.

By so doing our insight will become greatly enlarged, for from without we can see only one small portion of the circumference, while from the centre we can see the whole of it. If we fully grasp the truth that Spirit is Creator, we can dispense with painful investigations into the mechanical side of all our problems. If we are constructing from without, then we have to calculate anxiously the strength of the materials and the force of every thrust and strain to which they may be subjected; and very possibly after all we may find that we have made a mistake somewhere in our elaborate calculations.

But if we realise the power of creating from within, we shall find all these calculations correctly made for us; for the same Spirit which is Creator is also that which the Bible calls "the Wonderful Numberer". Construction from without is based upon analysis, and no analysis is complete without accurate quantitative knowledge; but creation is the very opposite of analysis, and carries its own mathematics with it.

To enter into the spirit of anything, then, is to make yourself one in thought with the creative principle that is at the centre of it; and therefore why not go to the centre of all things at once, and enter into the Spirit of Life? Do you ask where to find it? In your self; and in proportion as you find it there, you will find it everywhere else. Look at Life as the one thing that is, whether in or around you; try to realise the liveliness of it, and then seek to enter into the Spirit of it by affirming it to be the whole of what you are.

Affirm this continually in your thoughts, and by degrees the affirmation will grow into a real living force within you, so that it will become a second nature to you, and you will find it impossible and unnatural to think in any other way. The nearer you approach this point the greater you will find your control over both body and circumstances, until at last you shall so enter into the Spirit of it into the Spirit of the Divine creative power which is the root of all things. In the words of Jesus, "nothing shall be impossible to you" because you have so entered into the Spirit of it that you discover yourself to be one with it.

Then all the old limitations will have passed away, and you will be living in an entirely new world of Life, Liberty, and Love, of which you yourself are the radiating centre. You will realise the truth that your Thought is a limitless creative power, and that you yourself are behind your Thought, controlling and directing it with Knowledge for any purpose which Love motivates and Wisdom plans. Thus you will cease from your labours, your struggles, and your anxieties, and you will enter into that new order where perfect rest is one with ceaseless activity.

I think not. We are too apt to regard Beauty as a merely superficial thing, and do not realise all that it implies. She gave her order to the waitress.

Too busy to notice her appearance on the scene, the gentleman worked away at his ma- nuscript, writing in very large script, perhaps to help his vision in the some- what dim light. But what do you mean by Higher Thought? I am the secretary of a new organization at Kensington, called the Higher Thought Centre, where we study and listen to lectures on metaphysi- cal Truth applied to health, spiritual unfoldment, and successful living.

The result of this informal conversation was the giving and acceptance of an invitation to see the Higher Thought Centre and to attend some of its meetings. There was much mutual pleasure in the result. The man found con- genial friends and listened to novel but inspiring lectures, some given by New Thought lecturers from America.

The Centre, in turn, found a congenial, wise, though humble, helper who aided them in any way possible, gradually becoming a sort of host to the Centre, whenever he could visit London. This gentleman and scholar was Thomas Troward from India, and the lady Miss Alice Callow, the honorary secretary, whose loving efforts were faithfully and fervently devoted to the good of the Centre, in the formal- looking Kensington house in London.

Here there were connecting drawing rooms adapted with folding chairs and platform for lectures and classes, a li- brary of metaphysical books, and a reading room. These titles tell the story. It was for the most part a spiritual invasion from America. On the shelves were books by pioneer teachers of New Thought and Divine Science.

My own writings found a place among them. Thomas Troward found a literal mine of mental and spiritual treasure in these books and in exchange of ideas in the company of friends from across the sea. He also had rich resources from which to draw and give to all for the additional light on life and mind that he received. His was the gift of a fine philosophy and a deep and provocative interpretation of the Bible, particular- ly the Old Testament.

The contributions he received from Dr. James and Mrs. Anne Mills and later Mrs. Annie Rix Militz were of more actively applied metaphysics, less abstract than the older type of metaphysics to which he had become accustomed.

He admired the more spontaneous faith and ready intu- 9 itional acceptance of deep truths these teachers manifested in contrast with his own method of plodding, carefully calculated reasoning.

While he gained much from the more popular form of New Thought, in its transition from the more abstract metaphysics, he expressed regret that some of its pure beauty was lost in this development. He was concerned that it might become too commercialized in the process. It is true that the public is unwilling to download Truth for its own sake, but desires to know how to get the results needed.

It is, of course, all a matter of order and emphasis. There were the inevitable occasions for cups of tea, the favorite beverage. A lecturer at the Centre would be the target for a multitude of questions on personal applica- tion of the Truth, and each questioner would feel at home only if the lecturer accepted a cup of tea.

Cornwall Round, a physician who studied the subject of suitable food and drink as well as Higher Thought, always insisted, when he was an occasional visitor, that his questioner brought him a glass of milk.

Bible Mystery and Bible Meaning

Each one had a special need that they hoped would be met by Higher Thought. To some it was a health problem, and many had eloquent testimo- nies to the demonstrations they had made of healing through the new under- standing. Others had problems of finance they brought to the Centre, and found through study a harmony with the Law of Attraction, which brought due reward.

The greatest demonstrations of all were those of new spiritual understanding and unfoldment. In such unfoldment, whenever he could visit the Centre, Thomas Troward was always a willing and unselfish helper to the new arrival. It seemed very incidental at the time, for he was then unknown to fame, but it was the beginning of a fruitful friendship. It was when the century was very young indeed. In I came to the United States on my first lecture trip.

Thomas Troward—or Judge Troward, as Americans call him. As he had retired from his duties in India, it was the cus- tom to speak of him in England as Mr. I have never met a more courteous gentleman, and so natural, sincere, yet helpfully humble in spite of his profound learning. Perhaps you will give me the pleasure of letting me take up the collection for you, or help you to usher; or I will take the chair for you.

Troward was most apologetic because there were a few of the lec- tures and class sermons that a necessary return to his home on the South Coast would cause him to miss. Although his helpfulness would have readily compensated me, the sub- scription was ten shillings and sixpence, or half a guinea, as he called it.

Hidden Power By Thomas Troward, Free PDF, ebook | Global Grey

The American reader may smile at the amount. Of course, the money had more M 11 downloading power in those Victorian days, but also our New Thought move- ment was in its early development. What could our mature and learned Judge gain from lessons from a young Englishman who had toured the United States for five years to lecture on New Thought, Divine Science, and Constructive Psychology?

First, I brought him the knowledge of some American books he greatly valued, and which added richly to his knowledge and enabled him to knit together his theories with more positive proof, and second, some positive and original ideas of my own. Foremost among them at that stage in his life were the books of Thompson Jay Hudson, L. The painstaking treat- ment that Hudson gave to the nature of the subjective mind, which the public knows better now by the philosophical research and conclusions of Mr.

Tro- ward, seemed to give him solid ground for his beliefs. Hudson conservatively called the ideas he advanced a scientific hypothesis.

I knew Thompson Hudson personally. He was asked by a mutual friend his opinion of my lecture. He said that he was intrigued by my optimism and thought it wonderfully invigorating suggestion to the subjective mind. He said, however, that he would not like to prolong a life like this. Evidently he did not fully realize conditions could be corrected. This, of course, could not be called constructive suggestion to the subjective mind, which Hudson himself declared amenable to the power of suggestion, and the builder and chemist of the body.

This would appear to be remarkable confirmation of the amenability of the subjec- tive mind to the power of the word. Some may think that Mother Nature takes but little notice of our words; but she listens in, and engraves them in flesh and blood. Fortunately, the new word, spoken with power, if given in suffi- cient time, can dissolve the effect of a temporary error.

Thomas Troward was deeply impressed with the way that Hudson rea- soned in his book on psychic phenomena and the patient and detailed way he classified the subjects he discussed.

In its ready and impersonal ac- ceptance of the purposes we impart to it of health, happiness, and all-round well-being he saw the solution of the great problems of life and attainment. In addition to introducing the works of Hudson to Thomas Troward, I gave him my original contribution of consciously and individually directed evolution as the key to eternal youth and immortality, which includes the whole man—spiritual, mental, and physical.

He promised to give this ideal his most earnest consideration, and while he did not personally demonstrate this, he accepted and incorporated it into his teaching when he became a writer in , his first book being The Edinburgh Lectures on Mental Science. The theme was elaborated in his later books.

While ultimately accepting the full ideal of ageless life, Mr. Troward had a distinctly conservative approach. It required a lot of actual proof to convince him as to the nature of the subjective mind and its full amenability, response, and creative action to suggestion.

He was convinced in what then was a novel way. This was by witnessing experiments in hypnotism. Tro- ward, like myself, did not become a practitioner or an advocate of hypnotism, but it was in this type of early research that many of the facts concerning the nature of the subconscious mind were discovered. A theoretical knowledge of the characteristics of the subconscious was insufficient to give him full assur- ance.

His complete confidence came in a most interesting and unusual way. He had experimented extensively with hypnotic subjects. Some of his results were so full of interest and significance, we decided to help Mr. Troward and a few others by arranging a series of experiments in Dr.

The group that gathered for this purpose was mostly composed of of- ficers of the Psycho-Therapeutic Society, and nearly all physicians who had accepted and practiced mental healing. Round decided to go entirely out of the professional hypnotic field to find a suitable subject. He decided, after some discussion, to call in a streetwalker to whom a fee was paid considera- bly in excess of that which she earned in her regular calling.

The young woman consented to becoming the hypnotic subject for the evening after be- 13 ing fully assured by the physicians that the experiments would not in any way harm her. Fortunately, she proved to be a good subject for the test. She possessed a faculty for concentration. It is very difficult to hypnot- ize a mind-wanderer. First she was required to look intently at a bright shin- ing coin, and then directly into the eyes of the operator.

In a quiet but positive voice, Dr. You have a message for those who are here. You will speak to us clearly and brilliantly. You know great truths. You will tell us about them. You have wise and able associates, and you are open to their wisdom.

You are fluent and able. Remember, you are a wise, high priestess, and you can instruct us. Finally, she lifted herself up, proud- ly, and even regally, an impersonation of a Goddess, and launched into a dis- course in which she talked eloquently and learnedly of life, philosophy, and immortality.

Thomas Troward was profoundly impressed, as were the others, some of whom had previously tested hypnosis for medical usage, sometimes as an anesthetic for the milder operations. One man was positive the subject matter of the discourse, as well as her changed deportment, were supplied by a control in the form of a disembodied spirit of great intelligence. He saw in these results a proof of spirit communication.

The consensus of opinion, however, shared by Mr. Troward, Dr. Round, and myself, was that it illustrated the normal powers of the subjective mind, and that the ideas advanced were a composite of the ideas held by those present, or ideas received from the treasury or storehouse of the Universal Subjective Mind.

Cornwall Round was, like his name, quite round and plump. In his younger years he had been an officer in the army, and he sometimes won- dered if some indulgences in his early years might keep him from the full demonstration of the life abundant.

He had a knowledge of Hinduism, in which some groups took a fatalistic view of karma. Although he accepted in principle the relationship of the subjective and objective minds, and the ame- nability of the subjective, together with its power of building and rebuilding the body, he frequently made himself an exception to the rule.

The spiritual, which is always the truly dynamic power in healing, did not impress him as deeply as the influence of mental suggestion. Granted that suggestion is a factor in healing, we may still question concerning the quality of suggestion to be used. It is certainly not a complete idea to say that suggestion or thought is the healing influence.

Obviously, thought and suggestion can cure or kill. We must make it divine thought and word. The action of the mind is not complete unless we take into full con- sideration, and practice, our relationship with Super-conscious Mind. It was a matter of emphasis and proportion.

This, of course, would simply be distilled water, but exceptionally well aerated by the fresh morning air. This idea was seemingly borne out by the fact that the weathered gardener contacted the grass with his fingers at the dawn of day and applied something to his mouth. To his asto- nishment, he saw him take the small round slugs from the grass and put them in his mouth and devour them with evident satisfaction. Round was great- ly intrigued. He linked it in some way with the current interest in what was 15 known as organo-therapy.

I feel assured that my readers will not accept my relating this little story of the doctor and the centenarian as a rec- ommendation to emulate his diet!

In those days, a tennis champion and all-round athlete, as well as men- tal and physical health teacher, named Eustace Miles ran a large food-reform restaurant on Chandos Street, just off Trafalgar Square in London. In quite a unique way, he combined his food shop with a lecture salon, in which a va- riety of teachings included food study, scientific breathing, and metaphysics.

Round invited me to dinner at this restaurant. Among the items on the menu was a meat substitute in which there was a combination of yeast, beans, whole-wheat breadcrumbs, and perhaps other ingredients. In this, he was quite successful. My meal seemed quite fairly satisfactory—though I did not eat meat anyway, therefore did not need a transitional diet resembling meat in taste or appearance.

In fact, I would prefer my food not to resemble flesh food. That night, I had distress in my stomach of such an acute order as I had never before experienced.

I told Dr. Round about it the next day. He was filled with almost a schoolboy glee and rubbed his hands with delight. It was hard for me to see the joke. He explained enthusiastically that he had identi- cally the same experience the first time he tried this type of food and sug- gested that we invite Thomas Troward to this restaurant to dinner and see how the combination of ingredients would agree with him.

This, he declared with zestful anticipation, would be just a matter of scientific research. I per- suaded him that it would really teach us nothing new, and there was no wis- dom in making him suffer as a human guinea pig. I understand that in modern vegetarian restaurants a different combina- tion, and a different form of yeast, is used to give the meaty flavor and nutri- ment. However, our spiritual, mental, and emotional states are closely related to our complete nourishment, and the mental factor is always present.

Troward and I enjoyed a number of deliciously prepared ve- getarian meals in the beautiful home of the Roundses, for they had a wonder- ful cook and housekeeper, who knew how to cook the foods conservatively and thus retain their full flavor and virtue.

Then we would have the opportunity of an exchange of thought on the things that make for Life Abundant. Sometimes, a group of physicians would gather and we would discuss subjects under the head of Psycho-Therapeutics, of which the modern version is psychosomatics, or soul-body relationship.

Thomas Troward, relieved of the necessity of a lecture manuscript, was an animated and earnest participant in these conversations. The groups meeting at the Higher Thought Centre worked strictly along metaphysical and spiritual lines, and it was in this atmosphere that he gave and received help and highest inspiration. He realized also the value of the introductions to brilliant men in the home of Dr.

Cornwall Round and ga- thered many ideas from their talks, from which he occasionally made notes for future reference and study. Troward calls attention to the writing of Dr. Cornwall Round. This was something unusual for him to do, as he made it an almost inflexible rule to mention or quote only the Scriptures. A number of teachers whom he personally and warmly thanked for their contri- butions to his knowledge are not mentioned. At first, and with only casual thought, this might appear somewhat selfish.

From first-hand knowledge of him, however, I know that this was not the case. By quotation from others, in some idea he approved, he did not want to seemingly endorse other ideas that might be held by the individual.

His inborn caution kept him from even see- mingly sponsoring ideas which he had not explored in the most exhaustive detail. He was safe in talking impersonally on the principle in which he be- lieved. Whatever of Truth he accepted he felt was from that time an entirely impersonal matter. In this exceptional instance, which calls attention to the rule, in a foot- note he commends the reader to see Self-Synthesis, by Dr. The full title sounds more interesting, I think. Now out of print for many years, it was entitled Self-Synthesis: A Means to Perpetual Life.

As the title indicates, Dr. Round based the teaching on the power of the subjective to build and rebuild the body to a higher and more perfect degree when so in- 17 structed by the knowledge and word power of the objective, or conscious, mind.

The power of hypnotism is wholly in the quality of the suggestions made by the operator.

Troward pdf thomas

The hypnosis is merely the opportunity of giving the suggestions directly to the subconscious mind of the subject. The conscious, or objective, mind would argue and question the truth of the suggestions, and probably refute them. At the very least, they would be governed by previous education and experience, even if quite faulty.

The subject carries out its normal tendency of impersonating the pre- dominant mental ideas given by the operator. The subconscious accepts and does not argue.

Experience, however, has shown that this is a temporary phenomenon. The streetwalker did not become a great speaker and wise philosopher. The effect was temporary, because the influence was not her own. She re- turned to her usual occupation. One may, of course, inquire what would have been the effect if this interested group could have taken her into more or less permanent reeducation with a view to reconstruction of her life.

Certainly such transformations have been made without the aid of hypnotism. On this occasion, the experiment had the specific purpose of giving Thomas Troward the opportunity of witnessing the nature of the subjective mind and its re- sponse to thought and word. All were fully agreed that the knowledge of hypnosis placed a great and solemn responsibility on the part of any who participated in it. If a surgeon must have exquisite skill, and must have a clean heart, and also clean, anti- septic hands, how much more should one entrusted with a subject, who for the time being is a complete passive believer, have a pure soul and a clean heart and mind!

It must also be remembered that not only goodness of motive is to be considered, for the question comes whether even the best motives of one individual are for the best interests of another individual in all cases. But they 18 were quite along the line I have just repeated. There was a difference of opi- nion between some of the doctors regarding the question of complete control in hypnotic action.

The question of whether a subject might commit a crime under hypnosis was discussed.

Some thought this distinctly possible. Might it not, however, provide the occasion which otherwise might not occur? While this ap- pears very logical, one of the doctors present strongly objected to this view, and Thomas Troward, like the good judge he had been in India, said that he would reserve his opinion until he had given it more mature reflection.

It is reported in these later years that hypnotism has aided dentists in their work, enabled doctors to perform the lesser operations without the use of anesthetics, and has been of assistance in childbirth and in the correction of undesirable habits.

There are still many questions to be asked concerning the use of hypno- sis. In New Thought, while seeking to keep an open mind, its ministrations do not in the slightest way include hypnotism.

Christian Science also rigidly excludes it. It is claimed by some scientists that there is still room for strictly scientific investigation, for its possibilities, under rightful conditions, have not yet been fully explored, although so much time has passed.

It should posi- tively never be used for purposes of amusement. I have treated this subject at some length because even a mention of hypnotism is sometimes mistaken as an endorsement of its practice. The Centre was not a church, and Mr.

The Edinburgh Lectures on Mental Science

Troward was beloved and his work admired by many prominent churchmen; and when he passed on, the Chris- tian Commonwealth requested Miss Callow to give some details of the life of this deep philosopher. I am reproduc- ing the article here in her own words, for I know my readers will enjoy the story of one so well acquainted with Mr. The article was pub- lished in It is just fifteen years since Mr. Born in Ceylon in , he had, like all Anglo-Indian child- ren, come back to the home country to be educated.

At Beck- hampstead Grammar School, in spite of its fair reputation, he was not happy. Some streak of originality, perhaps, prevented his entire adaptation to English boy life, but the charm of Jersey, where he continued his education, entered into his blood.

No doubt the old Huguenot strain in the family found some congenial element in the semi-French environment of the college. The natural bent of his mind began to assert itself and in he took the Halford gold medal for literature. His college career completed, Thomas Troward went up for the Indian Civil Service examination, stiff even in those days, and at the age of 22 returned to India as Assistant Commis- sioner.

An incident in the course of his examinations foreshadowed M 20 the trend of life that was to replace the regulation judicial career when the twenty-five years of service was completed. Among the subjects left to the end, and quite unprepared for, was metaphysics. He had no time for research, and no knowledge of what books to read, so the paper was filled in on speculation. From those studies there was un- folded to him, as if in a vision, a system of philosophy which ab- sorbed in an undercurrent of thought all the working hours of the day and the quiet hours of the night.

Released at last from the oner- ous duties of the courts, he settled in England, and a manuscript of some nine hundred folios came slowly into existence. Then it was that Mr.

Troward first heard of the Higher Thought Centre. He inquired into its meaning and origin and before very long found himself among those of kindred views at the Higher Thought Centre. It was with some difficulty that he was induced to give his ideas in the form of lectures, nor was it till when he produced his first volume—the now famous Edinburgh Lectures on Mental Science—that his quality was fully recognized.

No words can overes- timate the value of this and subsequent volumes to the Metaphysi- cal Movement.

Their lucidity, insight and logic brought conviction to the New and Practical Metaphysics; many Churchmen especially were attracted by the Bible Mystery and Bible Meaning. But little adver- tised, these books have slowly made their way all over the world, and perhaps no one was more astonished at their reputation than the simple-hearted, kindly and fun-loving writer. Troward was preparing a manuscript of a new volume, dealing with the correspondence of science and religion, when he 21 was called from this scene of action.

This book will probably appear in the Autumn. This article of Miss Callow has carried us far into the field of Mr. The prospective book mentioned by Miss Callow, by the way, was entitled The Law and the Word and has been a source of great pleasure to Mr. It was indeed true that he was reluctant to speak before the public. It required the persuasion of a number of us to convince him that there was a large public in Great Britain, the Commonwealth, and the United States who would be interested and helped by what he had to say in speech and in writ- ing.

So far, he had imparted his ideas to the few who he felt would be inter- ested in these studies. It seemed to Mr. Troward a time of analysis and for- mulating basic principles rather than a more immediate application to daily life. Both aspects are of course important. It was here that the more pragmatic challenge reached him, largely from America as voiced by American visitors, including my own return to England.

Troward was pondering in his mind the difference between the old academic meta- physics and the new applied version. As he commenced to lecture, with ob- vious reluctance, and met the challenging questions of members of his au- diences after his reading, he saw more and more that the public would not be content with theoretical speculation, however logical and judicial, but would persistently inquire just how these wonderful ideas would bring substantial returns in increase of health, renewal of youth, success in life, prosperity, and harmonious relationships with people.

Troward pdf thomas

In a trunk, bombed in World War I, I had a number of such precious documents, including some very valued ones from our Higher Thought secretary, Miss Alice Callow, reviewing my teaching activities at her Centre in , a year before the famous Edinburgh Lectures of Mr.

In these she wrote, in the kindest terms, of the help that she and Mr. Troward and others received from my lectures and classes. It was indeed a great satisfaction to have been helpful to those who in later years did so much for humanity.

The only letter I find among my present papers is a short note from Mr. Troward, telling me that he was personally sending me a copy of The Edinburgh Lectures on Mental Science, asking for a review of his book in my magazine.

Ebooks by T. (Thomas) Troward

This maga- zine was Life Culture, which I published for some time. The letter follows: I am glad to say this book is enjoying a fair share of popu- larity which a notice in your Magazine would no doubt help to in- crease. I do not know whether you remember my being introduced to you at the Higher Thought Centre some time ago. I hope your work is progressing satisfactorily and that your new Magazine will be a great success. A 23 Yours sincerely, T.

After writing his wonderful books, and after their astonishing success, he found a new approach to Truth for himself, a new outlook, and a new emphasis and sense of proportion. This is the first time that this development in the life of Mr.

Troward has been given to the public. This is the momentous letter: I think from your letter that you too begin to feel, as I do, the presence of something greater than a merely intellectual element in the spiritual life.

I have no doubt in due course we shall find it. I think this great secret is nowhere more fully stated than in the writ- ings of St.

They are the most helpful books I know, and sometimes I wonder whether it is any use reading or writing others. Now I must end. My wife joins me in all kind thought. Yours very sincerely, T. Troward Earlier in this letter, Mr. Two very concise letters will show how Mr.

Troward proposed a heal- ing for a woman who was making considerable difficulty for herself and oth- ers, because of her fears. Dear Miss Callow: I enclose for your perusal the letter I have received from Mrs. You can return them to me on 24 Wednesday. The whole affair is a tempest in a teacup, and the less notice taken of it the better.

With all kind thought, T. Troward This is the reply sent: Dear Mrs. I have carefully considered your letter and it appears to me that the answer to all the suggestions contained in it is a very short one. Troward Another letter, although perhaps of no great importance, at least gives an intimate view of Thomas Troward, proving Mr. Troward helpful and co- operative in family emergency, and may therefore be quite interesting and give a sidelight on his habit of helpfulness.

This letter is also written to Miss Callow, and is as follows illustrating that the servant problem existed also in his day!

We are left without any servants and having to do everything for our- selves, my wife acting as cook and brother as house maid, while I clean boots and fill the coal scuttles—this necessitates my wife be- ing up to lay all fires which she declares I am incapable of doing.

I hope we shall soon get both house and servants. The picture of coal scuttles filled by Mr. Troward, and that of his clean- ing boots, conjures up something quite different from the visualization of the eminent Judge usually pictured in America.

From my early recollection of English weather in the country, it sounds rather chilly. It was probably only temporary inconvenience, and I like to think of Mr. Troward free from shin- 25 ing the boots of the family, and comfortably busy with his Bible study, his writing of books, and the painting he loved so well.

It may be of interest to the reader to find a correspondence between this simple glimpse into the domestic life of Mr. He aptly says: The true relation of the individual soul to the Universal Principle could not be more perfectly depicted than by the names Ishi and Hephzibah. We have only to turn to any well-ordered family to see the force of the illustration. The respective spheres of the husband and wife as the heads of such a household are clearly defined.

The husband provides the supplies and the wife distributes them. The analogy may not be exact, for analogy is never absolute; but it will be sufficient for my purpose if the very kind reader will realize that for com- pletion, it is not only necessary to have the Source of Supply, as representing the Divine Masculine; but it is also essential that there should be a Divine Feminine to lay the coals and really fire the heart and hearth with loving warmth for all the family.

The conventional idea of God has been too exclusively masculine, par- ticularly in the Protestant religions, and the Catholic religion—through the person of Mary, the Divine Mother—and the Christian Scientists and other Metaphysical societies and churches supply this imperative need through em- phasis on the Divine Feminine Principle, or Mother God.

The pioneers in New Thought activity believed in the Law of Attrac- tion, attunement with which would bring prosperity; but the channels of work 26 in which they toiled were not of a nature to bring early financial results. They met a critical public, unlearned in the Truth, who charged them with com- mercialism if they made good in regard to money, and who were still more critical if they fell down financially and got into debt.

The government pension was not too large, and the royalties from books had not reached a profitable stage in his lifetime. He tells in his letters to friends that his wife was the optimist of the family, and that her cheerfulness was in contrast to his tendency to worry. Still, it is true in many cases that the work and the ability used in teaching the Truth, if employed in the business world, would have brought greater results in the attraction and accumulation of money.

It is the sheer love of being of service that has kept many in this work. Tro- ward, however, writing to her friends at the Higher Thought Centre, happily finds this no longer necessary, and expresses her appreciation of the inten- tion.

She comments: Thank- ing you all for the time given and trouble taken over all this. With kindest thought, yours very sincerely, Annie Troward 27 Here is a most interesting letter, written to me recently from Miss Ruth Bradshaw, who was, for many years, Honorary Secretary of the British Sec- tion of the International New Thought Alliance.

London, N. Thank you very much for your letter. Yes, I remember that you knew Mr. She was a devoted student. She told me how, when the First World War broke out, the students re- lied so much on his spiritual support.

He and Canon Wilberforce were great friends. She told me how, one day, when Mr. Canon W. Troward with us. I believe the two men died within a day of each other. A letter sent by Thomas Troward to Miss Geere, his student, is interest- ing, especially from the standpoint of mutual help between student and teach- er. At a time when he felt the keen need of spiritual help, he found her mes- sage to him comforting and healing.

The Troward letter is written seven years after the publication of The Edinburgh Lectures. Just a few lines to thank you for your most kind letter and to tell you how much strength and encouragement such a letter gives me, coming as it does at a time when I am much in need of such help.

I am indeed glad that anything I have said or written has been of assistance to you, and if you owe me anything, your letter has amply repaid it. James Porter Mills wrote a book called Health. Later he added a chapter and called the new edition From Existence to Life.

Mills gave a copy of Health to Mr. Troward in On the cover of From Existence to Life is printed the following: It is clear, fresh, sane and self-evidently practical both in its psychologi- cal and spiritual teaching. From a letter from Judge T. She was very nice and very good looking, with long straight features. She was paying a short visit to England and then re- turning to France, where she lived at that time.

Troward write the books. In it she says: Heard, for many years Honorary Secretary of the I. Troward and he was often invited to their home. They were most kind and cooperative, and tried their best to recall incidents and events in his life, and glimpses of his life in India.

Their youth in these days, their absences in boarding school, and other factors made these somewhat few. I am grateful, however, for some interesting details from his daughter Ruth and his son Rupert. The American reader may smile at the amount. Of course, the money had more M downloading power in those Victorian days, but also our New Thought move- ment was in its early development.

What could our mature and learned Judge gain from lessons from a young Englishman who had toured the United States for five years to lecture on New Thought, Divine Science, and Constructive Psychology? First, I brought him the knowledge of some American books he greatly valued, and which added richly to his knowledge and enabled him to knit together his theories with more positive proof, and second, some positive and original ideas of my own.

Foremost among them at that stage in his life were the books of Thompson Jay Hudson, L. The painstaking treat- ment that Hudson gave to the nature of the subjective mind, which the public knows better now by the philosophical research and conclusions of Mr.

Tro- ward, seemed to give him solid ground for his beliefs. Hudson conservatively called the ideas he advanced a scientific hypothesis. I knew Thompson Hudson personally.

He was asked by a mutual friend his opinion of my lecture. He said that he was intrigued by my optimism and thought it wonderfully invigorating suggestion to the subjective mind. He said, however, that he would not like to prolong a life like this. Evidently he did not fully realize conditions could be corrected.

This, of course, could not be called constructive suggestion to the subjective mind, which Hudson himself declared amenable to the power of suggestion, and the builder and chemist of the body. Negatively, Hudson de- clared, The good old-fashioned three score and ten is good enough for me.

It was later reported to me that Hudson died on his seventieth birthday. This would appear to be remarkable confirmation of the amenability of the subjec- tive mind to the power of the word. Some may think that Mother Nature takes but little notice of our words; but she listens in, and engraves them in flesh and blood. Fortunately, the new word, spoken with power, if given in suffi- cient time, can dissolve the effect of a temporary error.

Thomas Troward was deeply impressed with the way that Hudson rea- soned in his book on psychic phenomena and the patient and detailed way he classified the subjects he discussed. Troward, however, amplified Hud- sons idea of the individual subjective mind by considering it as the individu- als share in the Universal Subjective Mind and formulated the tremendously helpful statement that the Universal Mind has Infinite Amenability, Infinite 12 Responsiveness, and Infinite Creativeness.

In its ready and impersonal ac- ceptance of the purposes we impart to it of health, happiness, and all-round well-being he saw the solution of the great problems of life and attainment.

In addition to introducing the works of Hudson to Thomas Troward, I gave him my original contribution of consciously and individually directed evolution as the key to eternal youth and immortality, which includes the whole manspiritual, mental, and physical. He promised to give this ideal his most earnest consideration, and while he did not personally demonstrate this, he accepted and incorporated it into his teaching when he became a writer in , his first book being The Edinburgh Lectures on Mental Science.

The theme was elaborated in his later books. While ultimately accepting the full ideal of ageless life, Mr. Troward had a distinctly conservative approach. It required a lot of actual proof to convince him as to the nature of the subjective mind and its full amenability, response, and creative action to suggestion. He was convinced in what then was a novel way.

Troward pdf thomas

This was by witnessing experiments in hypnotism. Tro- ward, like myself, did not become a practitioner or an advocate of hypnotism, but it was in this type of early research that many of the facts concerning the nature of the subconscious mind were discovered.

A theoretical knowledge of the characteristics of the subconscious was insufficient to give him full assur- ance. His complete confidence came in a most interesting and unusual way.

My friend and student Cornwall Round was a physician and surgeon, but would insist at that time, I accept the idea of physical as well as spiritual immortality, but please do not publicize me as Doctor or I may be ruled out of the medical profession. He explained that it was against the ethical code of the B. He had experimented extensively with hypnotic subjects. Some of his results were so full of interest and significance, we decided to help Mr. Troward and a few others by arranging a series of experiments in Dr.

Rounds house. The group that gathered for this purpose was mostly composed of of- ficers of the Psycho-Therapeutic Society, and nearly all physicians who had accepted and practiced mental healing. Round decided to go entirely out of the professional hypnotic field to find a suitable subject. He decided, after some discussion, to call in a streetwalker to whom a fee was paid considera- bly in excess of that which she earned in her regular calling.

The young woman consented to becoming the hypnotic subject for the evening after be- 13 ing fully assured by the physicians that the experiments would not in any way harm her. Fortunately, she proved to be a good subject for the test. She possessed a faculty for concentration. It is very difficult to hypnot- ize a mind-wanderer. First she was required to look intently at a bright shin- ing coin, and then directly into the eyes of the operator.

In a quiet but positive voice, Dr. Round repeated a number of times, You are a high priestess in the Temple of the Sun. You have a message for those who are here. You will speak to us clearly and brilliantly. You know great truths. You will tell us about them. You have wise and able associates, and you are open to their wisdom. You are fluent and able. Remember, you are a wise, high priestess, and you can instruct us.

After much repetition, in substantially the same words, her regular, personal characteristics seemed to disappear, and a new and more attractive individual appeared. Finally, she lifted herself up, proud- ly, and even regally, an impersonation of a Goddess, and launched into a dis- course in which she talked eloquently and learnedly of life, philosophy, and immortality. Thomas Troward was profoundly impressed, as were the others, some of whom had previously tested hypnosis for medical usage, sometimes as an anesthetic for the milder operations.

Troward exclaimed, This certainly proves there is a subjective mind that can accept and impersonate what is vi- vidly suggested when hypnotism has placed the conscious mind in abeyance; but of course, the thought is the real power.